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Publication numberUS2198135 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1940
Filing dateNov 15, 1938
Priority dateNov 15, 1938
Publication numberUS 2198135 A, US 2198135A, US-A-2198135, US2198135 A, US2198135A
InventorsJesse L Strasburg, Frederick J Livingston, George C Billman
Original AssigneeJesse L Strasburg, Frederick J Livingston, George C Billman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Engine vibration eliminator
US 2198135 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1940- J. L. STRASBURG ET AL 2,193.135

ENGINE VIBRATION ELIMINATOR Filed Nov. 15, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet l Invenlaz's.

Attarny April 1940- J. L. STRASBURG ET AL. 2,198, 35

ENGINE VIBRATION ELIMINATOR Filed NOV. 15, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 JL. Straw!) 21119, E J Livingston G. (1' B i Zlm an Inventors. by W A #01222 ey Patented Apr. 23, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ENGINE VIBRATION ELIMINATOR Jesse L. Strasbnrg, South Wiiliamsport, Frederick J. Livingston. Wiiliamsport, and George 0. Billman, Jersey Shore, Pa.

Application November 15, 1938, Serial No. 240,596 1: Claims. (Cl. 14-574) This invention relates to engine vibration surface 4, the innermost cylindrically convex wall eliminators and has for its object to provide a surface 5, and the flat Wall S rfa e last f construction which is simple in parts and more which surfaces lies in a plane substantially at efficient in operation than those heretofore proright angles to the common axis of the cylindrical posed. surfaces. A cover plate I. provided to close the with these and other objects in view the inchamber 3, may be secured in any suitable ventlon resides in the novel details of construcfashion. tion and combinations of parts as will be dis- Within the chamber there isprovided a pluralclosed more fully hereinafter and particularly y of segmental weights in of any ui a l m pointed out in the claims. separated from each other by a plurality of 10 Referring to the accompanying drawings iormresilient spacers H, which spacers also separate ing a part or this specification and in which like the weights from the outermost and innermost numerals designate like parts in all the views-- cylindrical urf es 4 an 5 respeetiv ly- E h Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a device weight is formed substantially as shown in that made in accordance with this invention as apeach is of an acruate extent substantially no 5 plied to a pulley, said view taken as on th line greater than the radius of the outermost cylindril-l of Fig. 2 and looking in the direction of the cal surface of said chamber, wherefore a miniarrows; mum of six weights may be provided in the smal- Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken as on the line ler sized c ambe s; lar er chambers ay have e 2-2 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the reate number of wei hts as found most de- 20 arrows; sirable. Each segmental weight has outer and Fig. 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional view inner ylin ri al rf which ar Substantially taken as on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1 and looking in co xi with t e spon urfaces of the the direction of the arrows; chamber, each weight is of a thickness to provide Fig. 4 is a perspective view illustrating one such clearance with the flat surface 6 and the of the segmental weights shown in Fig. 1; cover plate I as to permit movement of the weight Fig. 5 is a similar perspective view of a modiradially f the am r. each weight is of a fled form of segmental weight; radial dimension less than the corresponding Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken as on the lin dimension of the chamber, and further each H of Fig. 7 and looking in the direction of the weight is formed with its corners cut out or rabarrows, and illustrates the employment of the beted to form a pocket or recess for receiving a 80 modified segmental weight shown in Fig. 5; corner of a rectangular spacer H, as clearly in- Flg. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken as on dlcated in la 1, l f Such Pockets being of the line ll of Fig. 6 and looking in the direction stantially the same shape and dimension so that of the arrows; and no particular spacer is required for any one 35 Fig. 8 is a perspective view illustrating a modip ke n her Words h pacers may be interiied form of spacer for use with the segmental h n eable. weight shown in Fig. 5, The size of each spacer is such that it will ex- The device of this invention is designed for tend out of its p k n One direction beyond the application to engines or other mechanisms in cylindrical surface of its associated weight, and 0 which objectionable vibrations occur, and tends this extent is such that, when the W i hts and to substantially eliminate such objectionable vithe spacers are assembled in the chamber 3, the brations, resulting in a smoother operation of spacer W l be er pres i n in a. direction the motor or mechanical part. Therefore the r di f the Chamber y ll uppor the invention is applicable to various parts of meweig ts in spaced relation to the cylindrical mm 45 chanical structures but, for the purpose only of faces of the chamber. illustration, it is shown here as used in connection Further, another dimension of each spacer is witha fan pulley intended to be mounted upon more than twice the depth of the rabbet or an automobile engine shaft. pocket formed in the weights wherefore, when all The shaft is indicated by the numeral I and of the weights and spacers are correctly askeyed or otherwise secured thereto is the pulley sembled, each spacer will be under compression generally identified by the numeral 2, but this in a direction circumferential of said chamber pulley has attached thereto or formed in a face and the adjacent ends of the weights will 'be thereof an annular chamber indicated at 3 and spaced from each other. Additionally, the third having the outermost cylindrical concave wall dimension of each spacer is slightly greater than 55 the distance from the cover plate 1 to the flat surface 6 of said chamber wherefore, when the cover plate is secured in place. the spacers will be compressed and this compression will have resultants in both circumferential and radial directions. Obviously, the best results may be had when using spacers of uniform or homogeneous composition so that compression in three directions is made possible and hence some elastic- From Fig. 1 it will be perfectly obvious why there is no metal .to metal contact in circumferential or radial directions, and in Fig. 3 the side clearances have been shown at [2' and I3. In other words the thickness of each weight is such as to permit a clearance of approximately ,6 of an inch on each side thereof with the surface 6 of the chamber and with the cover plate 1, which clearance is maintained during the operation of the device. In fact, the compression of the spacers is sufliciently great to cause a bulge to develop at the spaces between the adjacent ends of the weights (as at I4), as well as develop at the spaces between the cylindrical surfaces of the weights and the chamber (as at l5), and develop atsaid clearances (as at It). Preferably the spacers II which are farthest from the axis of the pulley should have more resistance than those nearer said axis and, whereas this is indicated in the drawings by the difference only in weight of the cross-hatching, yet it is to be understood that this invention is not limited to the exact construction illustrated since any type of spacers is contemplated wherein the outermost will offer a greater resistance than the innermost to relative movement between the chamber and its contained weights, and this difference in resistance may be variously accomplished.

In some'cases positive insurance of this free floating may be desired and therefore the construction shown in Figs. 5 to 8 is contemplated.

7 Here a segmental weight 20 is shown which is a duplicate of the weight In heretofore described except that midway of each extreme end there is provided a slot or kerf 2| disposed in a plane parallel to the flat sides of the weight and thereby joining the two f bbets or pockets at an end of the weight. A resilient spacer 22 is provided which is a duplicate of the spacer ll except that across one face thereof there extends a rib 23 midway from the ends, and this rib is adapted to engage the kerfs such as 2| in the ends of twoadjacent weights. At the juncture of each pair of segmental weights, one or both of the spacers may be provided with such a rib, as found neces-' sary in accordance with the size, weight and speed factors involved. With the employment of such coacting ribs and kerfs, the segments will be positively spaced from the flat surface 8 and the cover plate I to insure no contact therewith.

From what has been described above it will now be seen that the vibrations are dissipated presumably as follows. The vibration of an engine shaft has a period which is automatically transmitted to all parts associated with that shaft and therefore such period of vibration is transmitted through the pulley 2 and the spacers ll into the segmental weights l0. However, when this occurs, the continuity of this period of vibration is broken up so that all of the segmental weights do not absorb the same vibratory deflection and consequently the inertias of said weights dampen or iron-out the objectionable period of vibration. In other words, if instead of separated segments l0 there was provided a continuous metallic ring, there would be no dampening or ironing-out because the period of vibration transmitted into any one portion of such ring would automatically and instantaneously be transmitted into all the other parts of that ring. By providing the plurality of spaced segmental weights which are in no metallic contact with each other, the deflection of any one segment is substantially independent of the deflection 'of another segment, and the resilient spacers aid materially in absorbing a portion of the vibration transmitted to any one segment and prevent the full transmission thereof to the next segment while permitting the free and independent movement of each segment.

When this device is assembled and the engine shaft starts to rotate, immediate rotation is given to the pulley, and substantially immediate rotation is given to the segmentalweight assembly, although it may be true that the weights might have a slight lag over the rotary movement of the pulley, but this lag would exist only in the initial movement. In other words the only differential between the weight assemblage and the pulley is that which is made possible by the .resiliency of the separators and, by the time the shaft reachesits intended speed, this differential for practical considerations becomes zero. The aforementionedlag does not result in any creep of the separators with respect to the cylindrical surfaces with which they are in contact, the avoidance of such creep being due to the compression in all three dimensions under which the separators are placed in the assemblage, which compression is caused by what might be termed the "over-size" of the separators with respect to the spaces they occupy.

From the foregoing description it will therefore be understood that by this invention there is provided a vibration eliminator particularly adaptable to engines or other motors and wherein there is provided a chamber, with a weight in said chamber, and means for spacing said weight from the walls of said chamber. In the more specific aspect of the invention the chamber is annular and provided with a plurality of. weights, which weights are segmental in character and similar to each other, and provided with a rabbet at each of its end edges, all of the rabbets of each weight being similar, the rabbets of each weight registrable with the rabbets of the next adjacent weight. In addition, the means for spacing the weights from each other as well from the walls of the chamber, are resilient means disposed between the ends of the weights and operating upon the corners or other portions thereof, said means coacting with said rabbets and fitting each pair of registered rabbets under compression but of such dimensions as to extend beyond the limits or the rabbets. In the most limited sense, the spacing means is a resilient member having a rib engageable with the registered slots which interconnect the two rabbets at each end of a weight.

It is obvious that those skilled in the art may vary the details of construction and arrangements of parts without departing from the spirit of this invention, and therefore it is desired not to be limited to the exact foregoing disclosure except as may he demanded by the claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of similar segmental weights in said chamber, each weight having a rabbet disposed at each of its end edges, all of the rabbets of each weight being similar, the rabbets of each weight registrable with the rabbets of the next adjacent weight; and means for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member fitting each pair of registered rabbets and extending beyond the limits thereof.

2. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of similar segmental weights in said chamber; each weight having a rabbet disposed at each of its end edges, the two rabbets at each end of a weight being interconnected by a slot, all of the rabbets of each weight being similar, the rabbets and slots of each weight registrable with the rabbets and slots of the next adjacent weight; and means for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member fitting each pair of registered rabbets and extending beyond the limits thereof, each member having a rib engaging the registered slots.

3. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber, each weight having a rabbet disposed at each of its end edges, the rabbets of each weight registrable with the rabbets of the next adjacent weight; and means for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member disposed in each pair of registered rabbets and having a portion extending beyond the limits thereof.

4. In a device of the character described, the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber, each weight having a recess disposed in each end thereof, the recesses of each weight registrablewiththe recesses of the next adjacent weights; and means for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member disposed in each pair of registered recesses and having a portion extending beyond the limits thereof and contacting the walls of said chamber.

5. In a device of the character described the .combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber; and means for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member disposed at the adjoining ends of two adjacent weights, said membetween such adjoining ends and having other portions extending beyond the limits of such two weights and in surface contact with walls of said chamber.

7. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber; and means for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising a plurality of resilient members, each member disposed at the adjoining corners of two adjacent weights, the outermost members having a resiliency different from the resiliency of the innermost members.

8. In a device'of the character described the combination or an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber; and means for spacing said weights from the outermost surface of said chamber, said means comprising a plurality of resilient members, each member disposed at the adjoining corners of two adjacent weights and extending beyond the limits thereof to contact the outermost surface of said chamber, the outermost members having a lesser resiliency than the innermost members.

9. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of recessed segmental weights in said chamber; and resilient means engaging the registered recesses of and operating upon the corners of the weights for spacing said weights from each other and from the walls of said chamber, said means comprising members the outermost of which has a resiliency different from the resiliency of the innermost members.

10. In a device of the character described the combination of a rotatable chamber; a plurality of weights in said chamber, said weights collectively substantially filling the space of said chamber but movable in said chamber during rotation thereof,,each weight having a recess extending inwardly from its outermost surface; and means for spacing said weights from the outermost surface of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member engaging said recess and extending beyond the limits thereof to contact the outermost surface of said chamber.

11. In a device of the character described the combination of a rotatable chamber; a weight in said chamber, said weight substantially filling the space of said chamber but movable in said chamber during rotation thereof, said weight having recesses extending inwardly from its outermost and innermost surfaces; and means for spacing said weight from the outermost and innermost walls of said chamber, said means comprising a plurality of resilient members engaging said recesses and extending beyond the limits thereof to contact the outermost and innermost surfaces of said chamber.

12. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber, each weight having a recess disposed in each end thereof, the recesses of each weight registrable with the recesses of the next adjacent weights; and means for spacing said weights from the outermost surface of said chamber, said means comprising a resilient member disposed in each pair of registered recesses and extending beyond the limits thereof to contact the outermost surface of said chamber. 7

13. In a device of the character described the combination of an annular chamber; a plurality of segmental weights in said chamber, each weight 4 a,1os,1as having recesses extending inwardly from all races ing therebeyond bearing against the walls of said thereof; and means for supporting said weights out 01' contact with each other as well as out of contact with any portion of said chamber, said means comprising spaced resilient members engaging said recesses and having portions extendchamber.

JESSE L. STRABB URG. FREDERICK J. LIVINGSTON. GEORGE C.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2594555 *Mar 18, 1949Apr 29, 1952Schwitzer Cummins CompanyVibration damper
US2597747 *Feb 25, 1948May 20, 1952H A KingVibration damper
US2636399 *Jun 17, 1950Apr 28, 1953Houdailie Hershey CorpTuned inertia mass viscous damper
US2664763 *Mar 29, 1950Jan 5, 1954Francois Sarazin GillesVibration damper
US2714823 *Oct 5, 1951Aug 9, 1955Cincinnati Milling Machine CoVibration damper
US2837923 *May 10, 1951Jun 10, 1958Bendix Aviat CorpDamping device for gyroscope or the like
US2977819 *Jan 26, 1959Apr 4, 1961Haushalter Fred LVibration damper
US3041889 *May 2, 1960Jul 3, 1962Haushalter Fred LVibration dampener
US3260136 *May 27, 1963Jul 12, 1966Donald B RottlerBoring machine
US4483685 *Mar 21, 1983Nov 20, 1984The Singer CompanyMotor isolator pulley
US4873888 *Mar 30, 1988Oct 17, 1989Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaViscosity damper
US5749269 *Apr 26, 1996May 12, 1998Vibratech, Inc.Dual-mode, viscous crankshaft vibration damper
US5979390 *May 29, 1997Nov 9, 1999Palsis Schwingungstechnik Gmbh & Co.Assembly for transmitting rotational movements and for damping torsional vibrations
US20120227536 *Mar 10, 2011Sep 13, 2012General Electric CompanySectioned tuning ring for rotating body
CN100425866CMay 30, 2003Oct 15, 2008株式会社富国粘性阻尼器
DE1240342B *Apr 17, 1963May 11, 1967Houdaille Industries IncTorsionsschwingungsdaempfer
DE4107880A1 *Mar 12, 1991Oct 22, 1992Carl Hasse & Wrede ZweigniederAnordnung zum daempfen von kurbelwellenschwingungen
Classifications
U.S. Classification74/574.3
European ClassificationF16F15/14B1H5