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Publication numberUS2198338 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1940
Filing dateMar 7, 1938
Priority dateMar 7, 1938
Publication numberUS 2198338 A, US 2198338A, US-A-2198338, US2198338 A, US2198338A
InventorsGreider James B
Original AssigneeGreider James B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Footwear
US 2198338 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

23, 1940. J. B. GREIDER FOOTWEAR Filed March 7, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 mm mm INVENTOR JAMES B GREIDER ATTORNEYS 23, 1940. J. B. GREIDER FOOTWEAR Fil ed March 7, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR JAMES B. GREIDER ATTORNEYS Patented Apr. 23, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FOOTWEAR James B. ,Greider, Racine, Wil.

Application March 7,

1 Claim.

This invention appertains to footwear, and more particularly to shoes of the type having a wedge-shaped pad of cushioning material (such as sponge rubber), in the soles thereof extending from the ball to and under the heel seat, whereby to form a substantially flat outer face on the sole and thusgive an adequate and resilient support for the heels and arches of the wearer.

Shoes of this type have been difiicult to mend and after the wear soles have been worn through, it has been customary to send the shoes back to the factory for this repair work.

It is, therefore, one of the primary objects of my invention to provide novel means for constructing a shoe of this typ whereby the shoe can be provided witha welt extending entirely around the same, so that the wear sole can be sewed thereto and thereby permit the repair of the shoe by the ordinary shoemaker.

Another salient object of my invention is to provide a shoe having an insole and a middle sole for receiving the resilient cushion pad therebetween, the two soles forming means for permitting the upper to be stitched thereto, and the middle sole permitting the carrying of a welt to i receive the wear sole by the ordinary Goodyear stitching.

A further important object of my invention is to form a novel wear sole substantially fiat from toe to heel, with the fore part thereof formed from leather and the rear part thereof formed from hard rubber.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement, and formation of parts, as will be hereinafter more specifically described, claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a shoe constructed in accordance with my invention, parts of the shoe being shown broken away and in section. 5

Figure 2 is an enlarged, fragmentary, transverse sectional view through the toe part of the shoe.

Figure 3 is a similar view taken through the heel part of the shoe.

Figure 4 is a bottom plan view of the shoe, with parts thereof broken away and in section.

Figure 5 is a detail perspective view of the insole.

Figure 6 is a detail perspective view of the middle sole, Figures 5 and 6 being taken on a smaller scale than Figures 1 to 4.

Figure 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional 1938, Serial No. 194,411

view through the heel part of the insole, taken substantially on the line 1-1 of Figure 5.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary perspective view 11- lustrating one step in the course of making -the shoe.

Figure 9 is a detail perspective view of the cushioning pad, the view being substantially on the same scale as Figures 5 and 6.

Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate correl0 sponding parts throughout the several views, the letter S generally indicates my improved shoe, and the same includes an insole l0 and a middle S018 II. I l

The under-surface of the insole Ill, from the 1 ball forwardly to the toe, is cut away, as at I2, so that the sole at this portion will be formed relatively thin. From the ball to the heel, the insole is provided with an inseaming channel I3 and an outstanding lip H. The middle sole ll is of the same thickness throughout, and its lower surface is provided entirely around the same with an inseaming channel l4 and an outstanding lip IS. .The two soles at the toe portion are firmly united by suitable adhesive, and a wedge-shaped pad of cushioning material, such as sponge rubber, I6 is placed between the two soles from the ball back to and under the heel seat.

The fore part of the upper is lasted by inseaming stitching I! to the middle sole II, and these stitches are received within the channel It. The rear part of the upper from the ball back is secured to the insole Ill by inseaming stitches 18, which are received within the channel l3. A flexible leather covering I9 is provided for the cushioning pad 16, and this covering has its upper face turned in at the heel seat and the shank of the shoe, and is secured to the insole III by suitable nails 20. If desired, a flexible heel piece 2| can be placed under the intumed part of the leather, and this piece can be held in place by the nails 20.

By referring to Figure 8, it can be seen that during the course of manufacture of the shoe, 46 the fore part of the upper is placed over the middle sole, while the rear part of the upper is placed under the middle sole and on top of the insole.

In accordance with my invention, a wear sole 22 is provided, and this wear sole is of the same thickness throughout and extends from the toe to the heel. A welt 23 is placed entirely around the middle sole and is secured to the middle sole by means of inseaming stitches, which are 2 2,198,388 a I r received within the channel i4. At the fore part oi. the shoe the welt 23is secured in place by the stitching H, which holds the upper, and this stitching can be continued back around the middle sole for thewelt and for securing the lower edge or the flexible leather covering it in place.

I prefer to utilize a compound wear sole, that is, with the fore part thereof formed from a leather piece 24 and the heel part thereof formed from a rubber piece 25. ;These pieces have their meeting edges beveled and overlappe and the overlapping edges can be firmly secured together by staples 28.

While I have termed the sole II a middle sole, so as to differentiate the same from the sole l0, it is to be noted that, in effect, the same functions as an insole. In some instances, a single insole can be provided, and the same can be split from the heel to the ball to form Changes in details may be made without departing from the spirit or the scope or this invention, but what I claim as new is:

A shoe comprising an upper, an insole, a middle sole, the middle sole and insole being attached at the toe part, a pad 01 cushioning material interposed between the insole and the middle sole at the heel and shank, the middle sole being provided entirely around the same with an inseaming channel and a lip, therear part of the insole at the shank and heel being provided with an inseaming channel and a lip, inseaming stitching securing the rear part of the upper to the insole and over the lip, a covering of flexible material for the pad 01' cushioning material turned over the upper face of the pad, a heel piece placed under the inturned'upper margin of the covering, means securing the heel piece and inturned margin to the insole, a welt extending entirely around the midle sole and inseamed thereto, the lower edge of the covering and the forepart of the upper being placed over the lip of the middle sole and secured to the middle sole by the last mentioned inseam, and a wear sole stitched to said welt.

JAMES B. GREIDER

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2526925 *Nov 6, 1947Oct 24, 1950Atlas ArthurWelt construction for shoes and boots
US2542292 *Oct 4, 1950Feb 20, 1951Edward W WhiteShoe bottom
US2598217 *Jul 9, 1949May 27, 1952Bronson Hazel JInvalid's boot with thick resilient insole
US2627676 *Dec 10, 1949Feb 10, 1953Hack Shoe CompanyCorrugated sole and heel tread for shoes
US2885797 *Aug 16, 1957May 12, 1959Chrencik Edward WShoe construction with resilient heel and arch support
US4178703 *May 24, 1978Dec 18, 1979Sidney PolsShoe to be worn over cast
US4236326 *Apr 14, 1978Dec 2, 1980Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US4265033 *Mar 21, 1979May 5, 1981Pols Sidney RShoe to be worn over cast
US4322891 *Aug 4, 1980Apr 6, 1982Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US4322892 *Aug 4, 1980Apr 6, 1982Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US4325194 *Aug 4, 1980Apr 20, 1982Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US4359830 *Aug 4, 1980Nov 23, 1982Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US4506461 *May 28, 1982Mar 26, 1985Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US4523393 *Apr 5, 1982Jun 18, 1985Asics CorporationSport shoe sole
US8336230Dec 1, 2006Dec 25, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear for weight lifting
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/104, 36/17.00R, 36/28
International ClassificationA43B13/02, A43B13/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/12
European ClassificationA43B13/12