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Publication numberUS2198959 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 30, 1940
Filing dateJun 7, 1939
Priority dateJun 7, 1939
Publication numberUS 2198959 A, US 2198959A, US-A-2198959, US2198959 A, US2198959A
InventorsClarke Hubert E
Original AssigneeClarke Hubert E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nasal filter
US 2198959 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 3o, 1940. H l.; CLARKE 2,198,959

NASAL FILTER Filed June 7, 1939 mmfwy@ ATTORNEYS Patented Apr. 30, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE NAsAL FILTER Hubert E. Clarke, Pittsburgh, ra.. Application Junev, 1939, serial No. 277,924

a claims. (c1. 12s-'14s) v This invention relates to nasal lters and has "for an object to provide a lter of this type which is lighter in Weight than conventional filters, easier to clean and be kept in a sanitary condition, which Will more effectively lter dust, pollen and other impurities from the air breathed through the nose, and which is easy to t and adjust.

-A further object is to provide Iay filter of this type which will not cause irritation to the tender tissues of the nose, which will iit noses of various sizes, which Will be practically invisible in use, which will not adhere -to the tissues of the nose, and which will have a plurality of filtering elements to eliminate toxic qualities that hitherto pro-posed nasal lters have for persons who are allergic.

l A further object is to provide a device of this character which will be formed of a few strong, simple and durable parts which will be inexpensive to manufacture and which will not easily get out of order. f

' With the above and other objects in view the invention consists of certain novel details of construction and combinations of parts hereinafter rfully described and claimed, it being understood that various modifications may be resorted to within the scope of the appended claims Without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention. l

'In the accompanying drawing forming part of this specication,

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a nasal filter constructed in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a cross sectional view taken` on the line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a plan view, drawn to enlarged scale, of the chassis or frame of the nasal filter.

Figure 4 is a plan view of one member of the chassis with the tubular support of the nasal septum yoke removed.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 3 showing the tubular eye prior to being clinched to the respective side member of the chassis.

-Referring now to the drawing in which like characters of reference designate similar parts in the various views, the chassis of the nasal lter comprises a pair of frames I0 and II each constructed from a single length of wire bent to provide a straight side I4, an arcuate side I5 extending for a portion of its length parallel with the straight side, the straight side terminating in a single convolution coil I2 and the arcuate side termina-ting in a coil I3 having a plurality of convolutions through which the single convoluas shown .at I9.

tion I2 is hooked, to permit adjustment of the frame sides I4 and I5 laterally relatively to each other for tting nasal passages of' various sizes. The nasal filter frames I0 and II yarejoined together through the medium of a wire yoke I6 Athrough the medium of! respective' eyelets` I1,

best shown in Figure 5, each of which is received in a coil I8 formed on the straight side I4 of a respective filter frame intermediate the ends thereof, the eyelet being clinched upon the coil The ends of the yoke extend through openings 20 in the bottom iiange of each eyelet and each end is bent around the respective eyelet in a convolution 2l to secure the yoke to the filter frames. l

The lter frames are preferably treated or coated with plastics that are non-toxic. Preferably the eyelets and the yoke are coated with flesh-color lacquer or exible lacquer lending an inconspicuous characteristic to the yoke when worn. However the filter frames may be formed of pure silver, which is non-toxic, or may be silver plated.

Each filter frame is surrounded with a pad or cushion 22 of lambs Wool treated to render the Wool, which is toxic to some allergic people, nontoxic. l

The pad is secured to the respective filter frame through the medium of a gauze envelope 23 which acts as an additional lter. This gauze envelope with the mat therein forms a triple filter, the lower portion of the gauze forming one filter, the mat forminganother, and the upper portion of the gauze forming the third lter.

The gauze envelope is treated with a commercial solution, the formula of which is unknown to me, and marketed as Gauztex. This treatment renders the gauze non-irritating and non-adhesive to the users skin or hair. The adhesive qualities of the gauze envelope serve to hold the mat in place and permit frequent and easy changing of the mat when necessary.

In operation, the nasal lter is thrust up into the nostrils in the position shown in Figure 2, that is with the lter frames extending horizontally, and the yoke bridging the bottom of the nasal septum. Air breathed through the nose must pass through the lter, and be thoroughly filtered. The resilient frame members I0 and II of the lter chassis hold the lter elements snugly in place without discomfort to the wearer,

and prevent leakage of air around the edges of the lter elements.

From .the above description it is thought that the construction and operation of the invention will be fully understood without further explanation.

What is claimed is:

1. A nasal :llter including frames each constructed from a single length of Wire bent to form a straight side, an arcuate side having a terminal portion extending parallel with the straight side, said sides conforming to the cross sectional shape of the nasal passage, the wire having a single convolution coil at one end, the opposite end having a multiple convolution coil, the single coil being hooked through the multiple coil for connection thereto and to perrnity the sides of the frame to adjust laterally relatively to each other, a yoke connecting the frames together and adapted to bridge the nasal septum,

f and lter means carried by the frames.

2. A. nasal lter including frames, each constructed from a single length of Wire bent to form astraight/side, an arcuate side having a terminal portion extending parallel with the straight side, said sidesconforming to the cross sectional shape of the nasal passage, the wire having` a single convolution coil at one end, the opposite end having a multiple convolution coil,

veloping the lterpad.

the single coil being hooked through the multiple coil for connection thereto and to permit the sides of the frame to adjust laterally relatively to each other, each frame having a coil formed on its straight side intermediate the ends thereof, an eyelet disposed in the last named coil, a yoke adapted to bridge the nasal septum and having a coil secured to each eyelet, and filter means carried by the frames.

3. A nasal lter including framesV each constructed from a single length of Wire bent to form a straight side, an arcuate side having a terminal portion extending parallel With the straight side, said sides conforming to the cross sectional shape of the nasal passage, the wire having a single convolution coil at one end, the opposite end having a multiple convolution coil, the single coil being hooked through the multiple coil for connection vthereto and to permit the sides of the frame to adjust laterally relatively to each other, each frame having a coil formed intermediate the ends 'of its straight sides, van eyelet disposed in the coil, a yoke adapted to bridge the nasal septum and having a convolution secured to each eyelet, a filter pad surrounding the eyelet and.

the respective frame, and a gauze envelope envHUBERT E.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7506649Jun 7, 2007Mar 24, 2009Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal devices
US7735491Dec 8, 2005Jun 15, 2010Ventus Medical, Inc.Methods of treating respiratory disorders
US7735492Dec 8, 2005Jun 15, 2010Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal respiratory devices
US7798148Dec 8, 2005Sep 21, 2010Ventus Medical, Inc.Respiratory devices
US7806120Jun 7, 2007Oct 5, 2010Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal respiratory devices for positive end-expiratory pressure
US7856979May 22, 2007Dec 28, 2010Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal respiratory devices
US7987852Feb 11, 2009Aug 2, 2011Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal devices
US7992564Feb 24, 2010Aug 9, 2011Ventus Medical, Inc.Respiratory devices
US8020700Dec 5, 2008Sep 20, 2011Ventus Medical, Inc.Packaging and dispensing nasal devices
US8061357Jun 18, 2008Nov 22, 2011Ventus Medical, Inc.Adhesive nasal respiratory devices
US8215308Sep 16, 2010Jul 10, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Sealing nasal devices for use while sleeping
US8235046Sep 16, 2010Aug 7, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal devices for use while sleeping
US8240309Nov 16, 2007Aug 14, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Adjustable nasal devices
US8281557Aug 18, 2011Oct 9, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Method of packaging and dispensing nasal devices
US8291909Sep 17, 2010Oct 23, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Methods of treating a disorder by inhibiting expiration
US8302606Sep 17, 2010Nov 6, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Methods of treating a sleeping subject
US8302607Nov 17, 2011Nov 6, 2012Ventus Medical, Inc.Adhesive nasal respiratory devices
US8322340Dec 29, 2006Dec 4, 2012Emilio TalmonAir filter for endonasal use
US8365736Sep 16, 2010Feb 5, 2013Ventus Medical, Inc.Nasal devices with respiratory gas source
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/206.11
International ClassificationA61F5/01, A62B23/06, A61F5/08, A62B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationA62B23/06, A61F5/08
European ClassificationA61F5/08, A62B23/06