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Publication numberUS2199459 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1940
Filing dateAug 10, 1938
Priority dateAug 10, 1938
Publication numberUS 2199459 A, US 2199459A, US-A-2199459, US2199459 A, US2199459A
InventorsHerold James L, Wehmiller Frederick W
Original AssigneeBarry Wehmiller Mach Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning bottles
US 2199459 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 J. L. HEROLD ET AL APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BOTTLES Filed Aug. 10, 1938 May 7, 1940.,

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APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BOTTLES Filed Aug. 10, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 lA/VE/VTO/ZS: J 1 HERoLo, F- 14 WEN/(M46183 May 7, 1940. J. L. HERCLD ET AL I APPARATUS FOR CLEANING BOTTLES Filed Aug; 10, 1938 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 E if - n, In

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' inner and outer faces of the bottles.

Patented May 7, 1940 UNITED STATES APPARATUS FOR- CLEANING BOTTLES James L. Herold, St. Louis, and Frederick W.

Wehmiller, Ladue, Mo., assignors to Barry- Wehmiller Machinery Company, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application August 10,

9 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for cleaning bottles, one of the objects being to very eifectively remove material from the outer faces of the bottles. Another object is to cleanse, or rinse, the inner faces of the bottles. A further object is to properly transmit bottles of different dimensions through the cleansing apparatus.

One of the problems in this art appears in the removal of paper napkins, and the like, which are firmly wrapped around the bottles at places where the contents of the bottles have been served. Such wrappings cannot be properly removed by the usual series of bottle cleaning devices which remove labels and also cleanse the In actual practice, these troublesome wrappings may appear intermittently, usually on bottles returned from relatively few localities, but rather expensive special treatment is ordinarily required to remove them from the bottles.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide for removal of such wrappings as an initial step in the bottle-cleaning operations, which are usually performed while the bottles progress through a series of different devices, or machines, for soaking, washing, brushing, rinsing, etc. A substantial advantage may be gained by removing the wrappings before the bottles enter the usual soaking machine.

To illustrate this feature, we have shown a cleansing machine which may be conveniently employed as the loading apparatus for a bottle soaking machine. The bottles may be fed by hand to this loading apparatus, and thereafter mechanically delivered to the soaker, etc. The new machine includes a special series of conditions which provide for most efiectiveremoval of the objectionable wrappings, as well as a preliminary rinsing of the interiors of the bottles. Nevertheless, it can be merely employed as a loader to feed the bottles to the series of cleansing devices, and its several additional functions can be selectively obtained to rinse the bottles, or to remove the special wrappings, in accordance with the judgment of the operator. However, the operating cost of these functions is relatively low, and they may be constantly obtained regardless of the condition of the incoming bottles; or the new features may be employed as desired to obtain any one or all of their advantages.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention comprises the novel construction, combination and arrangement ofparts hereinafter morespecifically describedand shown in 1938, Serial No. 224,060

the accompanying drawings, which illustrateone form of the invention. However, it is to be understood that the invention extends to changes, variations and modifications within the scope of the claims hereunto appended. 5

Fig. l is a side view of a" machine embodying the features of this invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section on the line 2-2 in Fig. 1, showing a means for securing the rotary brush in positions to which it is adjusted.

Fig. 3 is a top view of the machine, on a larger scale, with parts broken away to more .clearly show several features.

Fig. 4 is a side view of the spraying, brushing and rinsing devices with parts thereof broken away.

Fig. 5 is a-section taken on the line 55 of Fig.

3 showing Geneva drive devices for the machine. Fig. 6 is a detail view ofthe drive device which imparts an intermittent motion to the overturning device.

Fig. 7 is a detail view of one of the removable tubular bottle-guides.

Fig. 8 is a section taken approximately on the line 8--8 in Fig. 3. v

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary section on the line 9-9 in Fig. 8,; drawn to a larger scale, showing parts of -a conveyor for incoming bottles, an'd'guides for bottles supported on the conveyor.

Fig-1O is a fragmentary section on the line Ill-4 I! in Fig. 8, drawn to a larger scale, showing portions of the rotary overturning device, and a portion of one of the traveling pushers cooperating therewith.

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary section on the line ll-ll in Fig. 8, drawn to a larger scale, showing guides for the approximately horizontal bottles, and rollers which' impart rotary motion to the bottles at the brushing device.

Fig. 12 is a detail'view of a portion of one of 40 the traveling pushers.

Fig. 13'is a section taken on the line l3-l3 of Fig. 12.

In Fig. 1 of the drawings, we have shown the new machine arranged as a loader for a-large 5 bottle-soaking machine. This soaking machine includes a large tank I equipped with traveling chains 2 shown diagrammatically. in Fig. 1, and receptacles 3 carried by said chains .to receive bottles discharged from ourcleansing machine. The traveling bottle-carrier formed by the chains 2 and receptacles 3 may be driven through the medium of a shaft 4 near the upper end of Fig. 1,

said shaft being provided with a large. gear wheel 5 meshing with a pinion 6 on a power shaft 1.

Briefly stated, the machine herein shown includes a showering device A adapted to discharge liquid onto approximately upright bottles carried by endless conveyors 8, means including an overturning device B and pushers .3 for transferring approximately upright bottles from said. conveyor 8 to approximately horizontal rollers It, and under a rotary brush H arranged immediately above said rollers so as to contact with the outer faces of the bottles on the rollers.

The showering device A includes a conductor l2 adapted to receive liquid from any suitable source of supply, and is held transversely of the machine by supports I3 as shown in Figs. 1, 4 and 8. The conductor I2 is provided with discharge branch pipes it having outlets for showering liquid onto the bottles carried by the conveyors 8.

The bottles to be cleaned may be delivered by hand in approximately upright positions, to the series of endless conveyors 8 atthe left side of Figs. 1, 3, 4 and 8. The endless conveyorsB may be chains traveling around sprockets E5 on a shaft it, and driving sprockets l? on a shaft 20, to transmit the bottles under the branch pipes M of the showering device A and then discharge the bottles onto the overturning device B.

The bottles are frictionally seated on the top of the conveyors 8 and the bottles discharged from the conveyors onto the overturning device serve as a stop to limit the discharge of bottles from the conveyors, as shown in Figs. 4 and 8, until the said last mentioned bottles are carried out of the path of the bottles on the conveyor-s by the overturning device. To prevent the discharge of bottles from the conveyors 8 while theoverturning'device B is in operation, the conveyors 8 are driven intermittently so that they are at rest while the overturning device is in operation.

The means for intermittently driving said conveyors 8 includes a relatively small sprocket wheel 19 on the shaft 20 and a chain 2! extending from said sprocket Wheel l9 to a large sprocket wheel 22 on one end of an intermittently driven shaft 23, which extends across the machine. The other end of the intermittently driven shaft 23 is providedwith a wheel 25 forming part of a Geneva movement, (Figs. 1 and 4) said wheel having slots 26 adapted to receive rollers 2'! at the ends of constantly rotating crank arms 28, and arcuate faces 29 to receive the peripheral face of a notched disk 3|] moving with crank arms. The disk 38 and crank arms 28 are fixed to a constantly rotating shaft 3| provided with a sprocket wheel 32 (Figs. 3 and 5) driven by a chain 33 which passes around a driving sprocket wheel 34 on an intermediate shaft 35. Said intermediate shaft 35 is also provided with a driven sprocket wheel 36 which is constantly rotated by a chain 3? extending around a sprocket wheel 38 on the power shaft 1 of the bottle-soaking machine It will be understood that the Geneva movement, including the Geneva wheel 25 and crank arms 28. imparts an intermittent movement to the shaft 23, and this movement is transmitted through sprocket wheels 22 and l9 so as to impart an intermittent movement to the conveyors 8.

The bottles on the conveyors 8 are preferably held in approximate alinement with the discharge pipes 14 of the showering device to provide for I the discharge of liquid onto the outer faces of the bottles and into the bottles through the mouths thereof. The means for confining and guiding said bottles on the conveyors 8 includes upright guide walls 39 provided with tubular split guide members it (Fig. 7) adapted to engage the sides of bottles, as shown in Fig. 9. The split guide members it are frictionally secured to the guide walls 39 and may be removed when relatively large bottles are to be placed on the conveyors t. The guide walls 39 willthen confine the large bottles on said conveyors. As shown in Figs. 1, 4 and 8, the guide walls 89 extend from the discharge end of the conveyors 8 over the intake.

portion of the overturning device B to confine the bottles during the overturning operations.

The overturning device B which receives the bottles from the conveyors 8 includes a rotary hexagonal member 6! having seats 42 for the sides of the bottles to be overturned. The rotary overturning member M is secured to a shaft 43. This shaft #3 is intermittently driven so that said seats of the overturning, device are intermittently shifted from bottle-receiving positions (FigsA and 8) near the discharge ends of the conveyors 8 to higher elevations near the horizontal plane of the brushing device so as to shift the bottles from approximately upright positions to approximately horizontal positions.

The means for actuating the overturning device B includes a gear wheel M on the shaft 43 (Figs. 4 and 6) adapted to be intermittently engaged by teeth 45 at opposite ends of an arm 46 on a rotatable shaft 4?, said shaft 3'! being provided with a gear wheel 38 driven by a gear wheel it near one end of an intermittently driven shaft 5 which extends across the machine and is provided at its other end with a wheel ti forming part of a Geneva movement. The Geneva wheel M has slots 52 adapted to receive the rollers 2! at the ends'of the constantly rotating crank arms 28 and arcuate faces 53 to receive the perripheral face of the notched disk 30 which moves with the crank arms 28.

It will be understood that the crank arms 28 of the Geneva. movement will intermittently drive the Geneva wheel 5! on the shaft 50 a half of a revolution and this movement will be transmitted through gears 49 and it to rotate the shaft 4'! a half of a revolution.

At the start of each half of a revolution of said shaft 41 (Figs. 4 and 6) the teeth at one end of the arm 46 will be forced into and out of engagement with the gear wheel 4 to impart a sixth of a revolution to the shaft 43, thereby moving the hexagonal overturning device B a similar part of a revolution to shift bottles from an approximately upright position to an approximately horizontal position.

To prevent movement of the overturning device B when the teeth 45 of the arm 4? are disengaged from'the gear wheel 44, the shaft 43 is provided with a wheel 55 having arcuate faces 55 adapted to receive the peripheral faces of a segmental disk 55 on the rotatable shaft 41.

We will now refer to the means for feeding successive rows of bottles from the overturning device B onto the horizontal rollers i ii and under the rotary brush II. To illustrate this feature, we have shown endless carriers 5'! which may be in the form of sprocket chains. These chains 57 travel over sprocket wheels 58 loosely supported on the shaft 43, sprocket wheels 55 fixed to a shaft 50 near the rear of the machine, and underlower driving sprocket wheels 6| secured to a shaft 62 mounted in bearings 63. The shaft 62 (Fig. 4) is driven by a sprocket chain 64 extending'around a sprocket wheel 65 on the intermittently driven shaft 50 and a sprocket wheel 66 secured to said shaft 62.

Attention is now directed to the series of traveling pushers 9 carried by the endless sprocket chains 51. These pushers 9 are secured at their ends to the sprocket chains 51 and are movable around the overturning member 4!, so as to receive and lift the bottles during the overturning operation, thereafter pushing the approximately horizontal bottles to the brushing device. After the bottles leave thebrushing station, the pushers 9 also force the bottles off of the horizontal rollers Ill and into the receptacles 3 of the bottle soaking machine.

It will be observed that said pushers 8 are movable between the discharge end of the conveyors 8 and said rotary overturning member 4!. As shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 8, one of the pushers 3 is positioned to provide a seat for the bottoms of the bottles when the bottles are shifted onto the overturning member 4!. The pusher forming the seat for the bottles moves simultaneously with the overturning member, and after the overturning member has shifted the bottles to horizontal positions, said pusher 9 continues its travel to carry the bottles under the brush ll. During the movement of the bottles from the overturning member 4| to the rollers It, the bottles may be supported on suitable stationary guides 92.

As shown in Figs. 4 and 8, the top face of the pushers 9 for supporting the bottles between the conveyors and overturning device is inclined to approximately conform to inclined bottom faces of the bottles to firmly support the bottles while they are in contact with the seats 42 of the overturning device. The bottle-supporting and push ing faces of the pushers 9 are also provided with extended guide flanges 61, as shown most clearly in Figs. 12 and 13, to hold the bottles in spaced relationship while they are being moved by said pushers from the overturning device onto the rollers lil, and thence to the receptacles 3 of the bottle soaker. I

The rollers ill for supporting the bottles under the rotary brush H are constantly rotated to expose all of the outer faces of the bottles to the brush and also to agitate the liquid within the bottles to cleanse the interior thereof.

The rollers it! are secured to shafts liflrotatably mounted in a transverse bearing member 69 at the foward end, and individual bearings l6 at the rear, and said shafts are provided with bevel gears ll meshing with bevel gears 112 on a constantly rotating drive shaft l3 which extends transversely of the machine.

The rotary brush H is preferably movable toward and away from the rollers Ill to provide for an adjustment of the brush in accordance with the size of the bottles. Moreover, when the bottles are free of objectionable wrapping, or the like, and in the judgment of the operator it is unnecessary to subject the bottles to a brushing operation, the brush may be moved out of the path of the bottles.

As an illustration of a means for adjusting the brush II, we have shown the brush as provided with a shaft "M mounted in bearings 15 slidable in vertical guides '58. The bearings i5 may be raised and lowered in the guides '15 by an operating arm H which is fixed near one end to a shaft '18 (Figs. 3 and 4) extending across the machine. Near each end of the shaft 18 relatively short arms 19 are secured thereto, and said arms 119 are provided with abutments 19' adapted to engage the lower portions of the slidable bearhas a handle 80 whereby said arm 11 maybe manually actuated to raise or lower the bearings 15. The operating arm I? is also provided with a screw Bl movable in an arcuate slot 82 of a bar 83 (Figs. 1, 2 and 4) and a nut 84 on said screw adapted to frictionally engage said bar 83 to lock the operating arm "H in the desired position.

The brush H and rollers it for rotatably supporting the bottles are preferably constantly driven independently of the other mechanism of the machine by a belt 85 which extends around a pulley 86 on the drive shaft 13 for the rollers H, a pulley 87 on the drive shaft 1 for the brush H, and a pulley 88 on a motor 89 which is secured to'a support 99 on the machine. The arrangement of the pulleys 36, 81 and 88, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, is such that a raising and lowering of the brush requires practically no adjustment in the tension of the belt 85.

In the operation of the device heretofore described, it will be observed that the bottles on the conveyors 8 are transmitted under the showering device A whereby liquid is projected-onto the outerfaces of the bottles to soap any wrapping thereon, and also into the interior of the bottles to provide a cleansing fluid for the inner faces of the bottles.

The conveyors 8 are intermittently actuated by the rollers 27 on constantly rotating crank arms 28 through the Geneva wheel 25, so as to discharge bottles onto the overturning device B, as shown in Fig. 4=. After the Geneva wheel 25 has been actuated by the rollers 21 on both the crank arms 28, the Geneva wheel 25 is temporarily locked by the engagement of the peripheral face of the disk 36 with one of the arcuate faces 29 of the Geneva wheel 25, so as to prevent the transfer of power to the conveyors 8. I

Therafter, while the conveyors 8 are idle, the rollers 27, on the crank arms 28 successively enter slots 52 in the Geneva wheel 5! to actuate the overturning member t! and pushers 9 carried by chains 51. During the first part of the movement of the Geneva wheel 55, motion is transmitted through the teeth 65 in one end of the arm it and gear wheel 24 to move the overturning device one sixth of a revolution to transfer bottles from an approximately upright position to an approximately horizontal position. Thereafter the overturning device is locked against rotation by the coaction of one of the arcuate faces 55 on the wheel 54 with one of the peripheral faces of the segmental disk 56, movable with the arm 45.

While the overturning member M is moving, the pusher 9 forming a seat for the bottles moves simultaneously with said overturning member. However, after the overturning member is stopped, the Geneva Wheel 5! continues to transmit power to said pusher 9 to move. bottles in a horizontal path onto the rollers l and under the brush H, as shown in Fig. 4. At this time, motion is transmitted from the Geneva wheel (Fig. 4) to the sprocket wheel 65 which drives the chain 6 3 and sprocket wheel 66, thereby imparting motion to the sprocket wheels 6| on the shaft 62, so as to move the sprocket chains 51 carrying the pushers 9. As the bottles are moved under the brush ill, the peripheral face of the disk 38 moves into engagement with one of the arcuate faces 53 of the Geneva wheel 51 to temporarily prevent the transmission of motion to the pushers 9 and also the overturning device'B.

After the Geneva wheel 5! has been actuated by the rollers 21 on the crank arms 28, the rollers again actuate the Geneva wheel 25 to drive the conveyors 8. The rollers 21' on the crank arms 28, therefore, intermittently drive the conveyors 8, and during the intervals between the movements of the conveyors 8, said rollers on the crank arms impart an intermittent movement to the overturning device B and the pushers 9.

It will be observed that during the intermittent movement of the pushers 9, they travel step by step in an endless course, to temporarily locate the bottles under the brush H where the bottles are rotated by the constantly rotating rollers If? to expose the outer surfaces of the bottles to the brush it and also agitate the water within the bottles. The pushers 3 also intermittently push the bottles from under the brush H and off the rollers it] into the receptacles 3 carried by the chains 2 of the bottle-soaking machine. As shown in Figs. 3 and 8, the bearings 70 for supporting the rollers It! have curved extended faces 9| which tend to support the bottles as they are pushed into the receptacles 3 of the bottle-soaking machine.

The combined. brushing and rinsing apparatus herein shown provides an entirely feasible solution of the old problem involved in removing paper napkins, or the like, which are in some cases very firmly wrapped around the outer faces of the bottles. Such wrappings are soaked and loosened while the bottles are beneath the showering device A near the intake portion of the apparatus. Thereafter, ample time for saturation of the paper is provided before the bottles reach the combined brushing and rinsing station, where the bottles are rotated below the rotary brush l I, so as to positively remove the soaked. wrappings from the outer faces of the rotating bottles.

A further advantage appears in the internal rinsing. Some of the liquid sprayed from the showering device is discharged into the mouths of the approximately upright bottles, and owing to the manner in which the bottles are transmitted to the brushing device, this liquid remains in the bottles while they are rotated on the rollers IB. Therefore, the rotating bottles are subjected to a forcible preliminary rinsing while the brush is removing the saturated wrappings from their outer faces.

The rinsing liquid is eventually discharged while the bottles are in the receptacles 3 (Fig. 1) forming part of the bottle carrier of the adjacent soaking machine. It will be understood that said receptacles 3 are inclined and that the bottles therein are inverted in passing around the axis of shaft (Fig. i). As a consequence, the rinsing liquid with foreign matter carried thereby, is discharged from the bottles before the bottles enter the tank i of the bottle-soaking machine.

Another advantage appears in the flexibility of the combined brushing and rinsing machine here in shown. It can be conveniently employed to economically perform all of the several functions, while serving as a loading apparatus for the bottle-soaking machine. However, in handling bottles from localities which do not use the objectionable paper wrappings, the brush may be adjusted to a high elevation, so as to eliminate the crushin operation, and if desired, the motor 89 (Fig. 1) may be shut-01f to dispense with the rotary movements of the brush 1! and rollers it. Under the last mentioned conditions, while the motor 8Q, brush l i and rollers H] are idle, the machine will serve as a loading apparatus for the bottle-soaker, the loading elementsbeing driven in synchronism with the bottle carrier 2, 3, and independently of the motor 89. In other words, the machine can be employed to selectively obtain one or all of its several functions, in accordance with the condition of the incoming bottles, but the operating costs of these functions are relatively low, and real advantages will be usually gained by operation of the'entire machine.

We claim:

1. In a machine for removing material from the outer faces of bottles, a bottle carrier adapt ed to receive a row of approximately upright bot tles, a spraying device arranged above said bottle carrier to discharge liquid onto the outer faces of the approximately upright bottles, a brushing device including a rotary brush and rotary bottlesupports immediately below said brush, said rotary bottle-supports being approximately horizontal, so as to receive and rotate approximately horizontal bottles, and. means for moving the bottles from said carrier to said rotary bottle-supports, said means including an overturning device located in the paths of the bottles to turn them from the approximately upright positions to approximately horizontal positions before they reach said rotary bottle-supports.

2. In a machine for removing material from the outer faces of bottles, a bottle carrier adapted to receive a row of approximately upright bottles, a spraying device arranged above said bottle carrier to discharge liquid onto the outer faces of the approximately upright bottles, a brushing device including a rotary brush and rotary bot tie-supports immediately below said brush, said rotary bottle-supports being approximately horizontal, so as to receive and rotate approximately horizontal bottles, and means for moving the bottles from said carrier to said rotary bottle-supports, said means including an overturning device located in the paths of the bottles to turn them from the approximately upright positions to approximately horizontal positions before they reach said rotary bottle-supports, the axis of said rotary brush being approximately at a right angle to the axes of said rotary bottle-supports, and said rotary brush being adjustable toward and away from said rotary bottle supports.

3. In a combined soaking and brushing machine for removing paper wrappings from the outer faces of bottles, a soaking station provided with means for discharging liquid onto the upper portions of approximately upright bottles, a brushing station provided with approximately horizontal means for rotating approximately horizontal bottles, and an approximately horizontal brush to contact with the outer faces of the rotating bottles, and means for transferring approximately upright bottles from said soaking station to said brushing station, said transferring means including an overturning device arranged in the paths of the bottles and having bottle seats movable from approximately upright positions to approximately horizontal positions.

4. In a combined soaking and brushing machine for removing paper wrappings from the outer faces of bottles, a soaking station provided with means for discharging liquid onto the upper portions of approximately upright bottles, a brushing station provided with approximately horizontal rollers for rotating approximately horizontal bottles, and an approximately horizontal rotary brush to contact with the outer faces of the rotating bottles, and means for transferring approximately upright bottles from said soaking station to said brushing station, said transferring means including an overturning device arranged in the paths of the bottles and having and brush, so as to push the overturned bottles along said rollers.

5. In a combined rinsing, soaking and brushing machine for cleaning theinner and outer faces of bottles, a soaking station provided with means for showering liquid onto the upper portions of approximately upright bottles, so as to discharge the liquid onto the outer and inner faces of the bottles, a combined brushing and rinsing station provided with approximately horizontal means for rotating approximately horizontal bottles, and an approximately horizontal brush to contact with the outer faces of the rotating bottles, and means for transferring approximately upright bottles with liquid therein from said soaking station to said combined brushing and rinsing station, said transferring means including an overturning device arranged in the paths of the bottles and having bottle seats movable from approximately upright positions to approximately horizontal positions, and a pushing device movable over said overturning device and under said brush, to push the overturned bottles through said combined brushing and rinsing station.

6. In a machine for removing material from the outer faces of traveling bottles, a showering device adapted to discharge liquid onto the bot tles, a guide for approximately upright bottles below said showering device, a brushing device including a rotary brush and rotary bottle supports immediately below said brush, said rotary bottle supports being approximately horizontal, so as to receive and rotate approximately horizontal bottles, an overturning devicein the paths of the bottles between said guide and brushing device, said overturning device including a rotary member having seats for the bottles to be overturned, intermittent operating means whereby plane of said brushing device, so as to shift the bottles from approximately upright positions to approximately horizontal positions, and an intermittent bottle-feeding device including pushers movable around said overturning device and between said rotary brush and rotary b'ottlesupports, to push the approximately horizontal bottles through the brushing device.

7. In a machine for removing material from the outer faces of traveling bottles, a showering device adapted to discharge liquidonto the bottles, a guide for approximately upright bottlesbelow said showering device, a brushing device including a rotary brush and rotary bottle supports immediately below said brush, said rotary bottle supports being approximately horizontal, so as to receive and rotate approximately horizontal bottles, an overturning device in the paths of the bottles between said guide and brushing device,-

said overturning deviceincluding a rotary overturning member having seats'for sides of the bottles to be overturned, and a traveling bottle-feeding device including pushers movable around said rotary overturning member and between said rotary brush and rotary bottle supports, to push the approximately horizontal bottles through the brushing device, one of said pushers being movable between the discharge end of said guide and said rotary overturning member to provide a seat for the bottoms of the bottles to be overturned,

and means for simultaneously imparting intermittent movements to said pushers and overturn-. ing member.

8. ma machine for removing material from the outer faces of bottles, a conveyor adapted to loosely support rows of bottles in approximately upright positions, a spraying device arranged above said conveyor to discharge liquid onto the approximately upright bottles, 'a rotary brush, approximately horizontal rollers rotatably mounted below said brush to rotate the bottles engaged by said brush, and means for transferring the rows of approximately upright bottles from said conveyor to said approximately horizontal rollers, said transferring means including an overturning device having, seats to receive the bottles discharged from said conveyor, said seats being movable from their bottle receiving positions to approximately horizontal positions so as to shift the bottles to said approximately horizontal positions,

ranged above said conveyor to dischargeliquid onto the approximately upright bottles, a rotary 'brush,'approximately horizontal rollers rotatably mounted below said brush to rotate the bottles ed to loosely support rows of bottles approxi mately upright positions, a spraying device arengaged by said brush, and means for transferring the rows of approximately upright bottles from said conveyor tosaid approximately hori:- zontal rollers,'said transferring means including an overturning device having seatsto receive the bottles discharged from said conveyor, said seats being movable from their bottle receiving positions to approximately horizontal positions so as to shift the bottles to said approximately horizontal positions, and a traveling pushing device movable around said seats and over rollers to push the approximately horizontal bottles along the upper faces of said rollers, means for imparting simultaneous intermittent movements to said overturning device and pushing device, and means for intermittently moving said bottle-conveyor during the intervals between the movements of said overturning and pushing devices.

JAMES L. HEROLD. FREDERICK

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2477006 *Jun 7, 1943Jul 26, 1949Pierson Olof PApparatus for peeling fruits and vegetables
US8147616Oct 21, 2008Apr 3, 2012Stokely-Van Camp, Inc.Container rinsing system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/59, 15/61, 15/60
International ClassificationB08B9/36, B08B9/20
Cooperative ClassificationB08B9/36
European ClassificationB08B9/36