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Publication numberUS2199981 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 7, 1940
Filing dateNov 23, 1936
Priority dateNov 23, 1936
Publication numberUS 2199981 A, US 2199981A, US-A-2199981, US2199981 A, US2199981A
InventorsBell Alfred B
Original AssigneeHeywood Wakefield Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall cabinet table
US 2199981 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

, May 7, 1940. A. B. BELL WALL CABINET TABLE 4 Sheets-Sheet l',

Filed Nov. 25, 1936 May 7, 1940. A. B. BELL WALL CABINET TABLE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 23, 1936' ..5 r. .e i m A. B. BELL WALL CABINET TABLE May 7, 1940.

Filed NOV. 23, 1936 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 May 7, 1940- A. B. BELL WALL CABINET TABLE` f Filed NOV. 23. 1956 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented May 7, 17940 WALL CABINET TABLE Alfred B. Bell, Gardner, Mass., assigner to Heywood-Wakefield Company, Gardner, Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts Application November 23,1936, Serial No. 112,198 4 claims. w1. 311-19) This invention relates to a table which is mounted for movement from a horizontal position of use in which it projects from a wall, and

an idle position in which it is stowed vertically in a cabinet against the Wall, the cabinet being either flush, semi-flush or extended, according to the nature of the wall itself. A table of this variety may be particularly useful in vehicles such as railway coaches and thev like, and may also be employed in other structures such as houses.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a Wall cabinet table which is permanently attached to the wall, but is readily movable from its idle position to its position for use. It is a further object of the invention to provide a table Which is variable in length so that it can t'elescope, or be otherwise collapsed to enter a cabinet of convenient size. It is a further `object of the invention to provide a table Which is simple inl structure but is relatively strong and strongly supported.

For a more complete disclosure of the invention, reference may be had to the description thereof which follows and to the illustration of certain embodiments thereof on the drawings of which 1 Figure 1 is a side elevation of a table embodying the invention, the table being shown in its position for use.

Figure la is a fragmentary sectional view showing the relation of securing elementsindicated in Figure 1.

Figure 2 is a side elevationof the table in anintermediate position between its useful and idle positions.

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the table in its idle position Within a Wall cabinet.

Figure 4 is a fragmentary section on the line 4--4 of Figure 1.

Figures 5, 6 and '7 are perspective views of portions of a telescoping table, the members being shown apart from each other.

Figure 8 is a fragmentary section on the line 8 8 of Figure 3.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary section on the line 9-9 of Figure 1.

Figure 10 is a side elevation of a table of modi` Figure 13 is a fragmentary section on the line I3-l3 of Figure 12. Y I

- ing means comprising a pair of suitable plungers Figure 14 is a fragmentary perspective viewv of a -portion of the table shown in Figure 10. y

Figure 15 is a section on the lines |5-I5 of Figure 10.

Figure 16 is a side elevation of another modi 5:'v4

fied form of the invention. ..13

Figure 17 is a side elevation of the same,- showing the parts in different positions.y f

Figure 18 is a fragmentary perspective view` of the table-supporting means. As indicated in Figure 1, the invention may be embodied in a table 20 which may be provided with a'telescoping extension 22. `The eective length of the table is thus variable. When in its telescoped condition, the table is adapted .to swing into vertical position and to enter a vertical Wall cabinet 24 which may be secured ,to the face of the wall' or may be mounted in a flushv or semi-flush position according to conveniencel In order to support the table 20 in its horizontal position as shown in Figure l, a pair of 'bracket'. links 26 may be provided, each link being pivot-i' ally attached as at 28 to a side edge of the. table? 20, and being pivot'ally attached at its other end, as at 30 to a suitable ear 32 which may be `secured toa side Wall of the cabinet 26 or may be; mounted directly on the wall itself. As the center of gravity of the table, even when in its telescoped condition; is beyond the pivot 28, the,` end of the table which abutsl the wall must be y suitably anchored to support the opposite outer end. For this purpose, one or more hook ele-f ments 34 are firmly mounted on the abutting end of the table 20, these hooks engaging'behind" an ear or flange 36 which itself is in the naturer of a hook at the upper end of the cabinet 24so that the table is held against outward movementA as well as against tilting. In order to secure lthe` table releasably in its horizontal position, lockj 40 are mounted to pro-ject through the side o Walls of the cabinet 24 so as to engage under the: hooks 34 and to prevent accidental disengagee; ment of these hooks from the ear 36. These plungers are preferably spring-pressed by a suit? able spring 42, as indicated in Figure 8, linger knobs 44 being provided to facilitate retraction".-

of the plungers 40 to releasefthe hook elements 34. When the plungers 44 are retracted, the

table may be tilted up to disengage the hookslll from the ear 36. The outer end of the table is,` then swung upwardly as the bracket links'26 descend (Figure 2), so that the table swings intoa vertical position with its top face toward the, Wall. This movement, which is indicated VinA Fig-ure 2, is particularly advantageous for tables mounted on the walls of railway cars between successive seats as the table can be moved from one position to the other without interfering with seated passengers adjacent theret'o. The length o-f the links 25 and the location of the pivot points 28 and 3U are preferably determined in such a way that the table 22 enters and fits into the cabinet 2li. It is also preferable, but not necessary, that the top of the table when in a horizontal position be substantially flush with the top of the cabinet 2d, as illustrated in Figure l. To this end, the table 2d is preferably of substantially the same length as the cabinet 24. Furthermore, the distance from the pivot 30 to the bottom of the wall cabinet 24 is preferably equal to the length of the bracket links 2B plus the distance between the pivots 28 and the extreme ends of the hooks 3d. The length of the table 2d is also such that the distance from the pivot 23 to the outer end of the table is substantially equal to the length of the bracket 26 plus thedistance from the pivots 3) to the top f the wall cabinet. When the foregoing conditions are fulfilled, the table 2G is adapted to t into the wall cabinet when in its vertical position and is substantially flush with the top of the cabinet when in its horizontal position.

The bottom of the cabinet 24 is preferably provided with an upstanding ear or ange d behind which the hooks 3d can engage when the table is stowed within the cabinet. This prevents outward movement of the lower portion of the table until the upper portion has been swung out. The upper portion of the table may be releasably secured in the cabinet by any suitable means. As indicated in Figures 3 and 8, the upper end of the table, when in its vertical position, is provided with perforations 5G through its side walls, these perforations being located so as to register with and receive the plungers Ml when the table is in its idle position. In order to facilitate the removal of the table from the cabinet 2li one or more .spring elements 52 may be mounted within the cabinet so as toproject outa short distance from the rear wall thereof, two such elements being employed in the structure illustrated. As the table approaches its idle position within the cabinet, it comes in lcontact with the springs 52 and must be pushed against such springs into its vertical position. Thus, when the plungers Ml are retracted from the apertures 5t, the springs 52 eject the table from the cabinet so that it can be readily grasped l.and swung to its yhorizontal position for use.

In order to increase the utility of the table without enlarging the wall cabinet, the table may be made in such a way as to be extensible. In Figures l to 9 inclusive, a telescoping structure is shown. The table 2D may be ymade vof sheet metal suitably shaped with channels 54 and 56 along its side edges. 'Ihese channels receive the side edge portions of the extension 22 and stiftening rails 58 and 60. As indicated in vFigure 9, the extension 22 may be made of sheet metal bent into suitable shape, the lower portion 52 being secured thereto inv order :to stiften the extension and also to provide a Apanel-.like member to be exposed on the wall when .the table is disposed in its idle position within the cabinet. In order to minimize frictional resistance `to teles'c'oping movement of the extension 22, suitable rollers-66 and v538 may be mounted within the channels 54 and 5S and on the side edges of the extension -22 respectively, ythese lrollersy being formed to move in shallow longitudinal recesses or grooves 'i0 and 12 in the opposite faces of the rails 58 and 60. The rollers d6 and 63 may be formed with iiared end portions as illustrated at 14 in Figure 9, the grooves 'lil and l2 being pre-ferably formed so as to receive these flared portions of the rollers 66 and 68 in fitted relation,

thus strengthening the table structure as a whole. Stop elements are pro-vided yto prevent removal of the extension 22 or the rails 58 and G from the table portion 20. Such stops are illustrated in' Figures 4 and '7 and may consist of small blocks secured inthe grooves 'l0 and 120i the stifiening rails 58 and Bil. When the extension 22 is pulled out to increase the length o-i the table to its maximum, the inner pair of rollers 68, y that is the pair of rollers nearest the wall, ultimately engage corresponding stop elements i6. This represents the maximum outward move- 'ment of the extension 22 with relation to the rails 58 and 60. These rails can move outward until the rollers, which are mounted within-the:-

channels of the table portion 2u, engage the stop;

elements 80 which are mounted in the outer` grooves of the rails 58 and Sil. Thus further" outward movement of the rails is prevented the rails are retained in position in which they are approximately equally disposed within thel table 2U and the extension 22. When the extension 22 is pushed in to telescope with the table 20, the rollers 58 which are remote from the `wall abut a pair of stop elements 82. Further inward movement of the extension carries with it the railsk 58 and 60 so that the rails thereafter move with the extension until the parts are in.v

their completely telescoped positions.

A modified .form of collapsible table is umstrated in Figures l0. to 15 inclusive. vThe supporting means for this table may be identical with the supporting means described and illustrated khereinbefore as -a part of the table structure illustrated in Figure l. The collapsible table illustrated in Figure l0 may be provided with two or more sections, two sections 9B and' 92 being illustrated in Figure 10. The section 92 is hinged to the section 9@ so that it can be. swung down into a position in which its bottomface is opposed to the bottom face of the section 90, as indicated in Figure 11. As the table members 90 and 92 are preferably made of sheet.

metal bent to shape, the side flanges of the-table receive a suitable pivot member 98 for v`the -ta-ble sections. A metal piece mi! hav-ing an aperture |02 maybe mounted on either :side of the table' section 90 near the outer end of this section, so

that, when the table is :swung to its `idle vertical position, the apertures 102 will move intofregistry with and will receive the plungers dll.

The side edges of the table sections di! and .921

stiifening tubes `IH! being secured to the .ends

` members may be reinforced as at 94 and 9B to` `v These channels isllfl` ,n

of the `plate H2 for additional stiftness. The

members IID slide in suitable irl-shaped members H6 a pair of which `ar-e welded Orotherw-ise secured to the bottom o-f the table sectionf, 'another pair being,A secured to lthe bottom of the These pairs of rails are alined v, table is inposition for use, the vstiifening mem-` ber is about equally divided between ,thefsections 90 and 92,.,as indicated in Figure 10. When the table is collapsed, the stiffening member telescopes in the outer section 92 of the table.

Another form of supporting means for the table is illustrated in Figures 16, 17 and 18. As therein shown, a Wall cabinet |20 is provided having a top, rear wall and a pair of side walls. In the specific form illustrated, the cabinet is designed to be set into the wall so as to `be flush with the surface thereof, the side walls of the cabinet being provided with flanges or trim |22. The table 20 is hinged to the top of the cabinet as at |24 and is supported in its horizontal position as by a pair of bracket members |26 the upper ends of which are hinged to the sides of the table as at |28. The lower ends of the bracket members |26 are disposed within the cabinet |20 and are each provided with a stud |30 which projects through a suitable slot |32 in the respective side wall of the cabinet. As indicated in Figure 18, the studs |30 may be the end portions of a single rod which extends across the cabinet and through the ends of the bracket members |26 to project through the respective slots |32. The studs |30 ride up and down in the slots |32 as the table 20 is rocked between its horizontal position for use and its Vertical idle position. The hinge |24 is preferably arranged so that, when the table is swung to its vertical position, its surface will be substantially flush with the trim |22 and with the wall surface of the vehicle. The studs |30 are supported by a' pair of latches |40 which are mounted on the side Walls of the cabinet so as to rock about pivots |42. The range of such rocking movement is limited by studs |44 in the latches, these studs riding in slots |46 in the side walls of the cabinet. The studs |44 may be the end portions of a rod which extends from one latch to the other, this rod having its intermediate portion bowed upwardly as at |48 so as to be more readily accessible. a

The latches |40 are each provided with a sloping cam portion |50 above which is a shoulder or notch |52 adapted to receive one of the studs |30. When the studs |30 rest in the notches |52, as indicated in Figures 16 and 18, the bracket members |26 are adequately supported at their lower ends. The cam po-rtions |50 of the latches |40 normally extend across the slots 32, and are yieldingly held in such position by suitable spring means such as the springs |54 which bear against the upper ends of the latches |40. When the table 20 is swung from its vertical position up to its horizontal position, the studs |30 ride upwardly in the slots |32, eventually engaging the cam portions |50 of the latches |40 so as to swing them away from the slots |32 as the studs |30 move into position above the notches |52. The springs |54 thereupon rock the latches |40 back to operative position so that the notches |52 are in position to receive and support the studs |30. The table 20 is now in its position for use and is supported in such position until the rod |48 is manually pushed to rock the latches |40 back from the slots |32. This releases the studs |30 and permits the table 20 to swing down to its Vertical position within the cabinet.

If a table of greater length than the'height of thecabinet |20 is desired, an extension 22 may be provided, this extension being mounted on the main portion20 ofthe table as illustrated in Figures 4 vto 9 inclusive, or', if preferred, the table maybe provided with a hinged extension as illus- Ineither case, the table in.

trated in Figure 10.y its collapsed or folded form is preferably of just suiiicient length to fit within the cabinet |20. At the end of the table remote from the hinge |24 there may be provided a suitable latch |60 operable by a linger-piece or key, as well known in the art, this latch/being adapted to 'engage behind a xed element |62 when the table is in its vertical position so as to retain the table in its cabinet until the latch is released preparatory to swinging the table up to its position for use. An abutment element |64 may also be provided in the cabinet to be engaged by the outer end of the table when the table is in its idle position, the table then` being held between the abutment member |64 and the fixed element |62 so that all looseness or rattling is eliminated.

It is evident that various modiiications and changes may be made in the specic details of the embodiments of the invention herein shown and described, without departing from the spirit or scope thereof as deiined in the following claims.

I claim:

l. A table adapted to project horizontally from a wall when in use, means releasably securing to said wall the abutting end of the table, a pair of bracket links pivotally attached at one end to the side edges of the table and at the other end to said wall, and means for holding said table in a vertical position with its top face toward the wall, said securing means comprising a pair of hooks at the corners of said abutting end of the table, a pair of lugs mounted on said wall and engageable from below by said hooks, and releasable means engaging said hooks from below when the table is in position for use to hold said hooks in engagement with the respective lugs.

2. A table adapted to project horizontally from a wall when in use, means releasably securing to said wall the abutting end of the table, a pair of bracket links pivotally attached at one end to the side edges of the table and at the other end to said wall, and means for holding said table in a vertical position with its topface toward the wall, said securing means comprising a pair of hooks at the corners of said abutting end of the table, a pair of lugs mounted on said wall and engageable from below by said hooks, and releasable means engaging said hooks from below when the table is in position for use to hold said hooks in engagement'with the respective lugs, said releasable means being adapted to engage the sides of said table to hold the table in its vertical position.

3. A table adapted to project horizontally from a wall, a vertical cabinet secured to said wall to receive said table, said cabinet having a downwardly projecting ear at its" upper end and an upwardly projecting ear at its lower end, hook means on the abutting end of the table adapted to catch behind the upper said ear when the table is in its horizontal position and to catch behind the lower end when the table is in its idle position, a pair of bracket links pivotally attached to the side edges of the table and to said cabinet, and latch means releasably engaging said hook to maintain the same in engagement with said upper ear when the table is in horizontal position and releasably engaging the opposite end of the table to maintain the same Within the cabinet when the table is in its idle position.v

4. A table adapted to project horizontally from a wall when in use and to be vertically againstthe Wall when in idle position, a, pair of supporting links pivoted at one end to said wall and at the other end to said table, and-locking means operatively engaging one end of the table to secure it' When the table is in position forv use, v

and operatively engaging the other end of the table to ancho-r it when the table is in its Vertil 5'

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2517385 *Apr 4, 1947Aug 1, 1950Int Harvester CoFold-away shelf for refrigerators or the like
US2626194 *Nov 3, 1950Jan 20, 1953Clower Patrick ARetractile tray for automobile instrument panels
US2634181 *Nov 15, 1950Apr 7, 1953Austin Hunt JamesRetractile tray for automobile instrument panels
US2843436 *Apr 17, 1957Jul 15, 1958Sturdi Bilt Steel Products IncWall mounted folding table
US2922683 *Oct 20, 1955Jan 26, 1960Schmertz Charles BKitchen fixtures
US3227110 *Feb 17, 1964Jan 4, 1966Hamilton Cosco IncShelf construction
US3242882 *Dec 18, 1964Mar 29, 1966Clark Equipment CoTable
US3346886 *Nov 26, 1963Oct 17, 1967Keiji KashiwamuraCombination basin and work board
US3866547 *Aug 20, 1973Feb 18, 1975Guyton Floyd RStowable wall table
US3897971 *Jun 17, 1974Aug 5, 1975Ddt IncTrailer installation
US4602570 *Jun 6, 1983Jul 29, 1986Frito-Lay, Inc.Extendable shelf for a display rack
US4620489 *Sep 7, 1982Nov 4, 1986The Kent CorporationExtendible merchandise shelving display
US7100316May 30, 2003Sep 5, 2006Olufemi ObileyeCollapsible ironing board
US20130269574 *Apr 11, 2012Oct 17, 2013Christopher CooperExpandable and collapsible tables and related methods
EP0620148A2 *Apr 6, 1994Oct 19, 1994ANCRA Jungfalk GmbHVehicle loading surface structure with a support tube
WO2003101252A1 *May 30, 2003Dec 11, 2003Obileye OlufemiCollapsible ironing board
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/38, 108/166, 108/134
International ClassificationA47B5/04, A47B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B5/04
European ClassificationA47B5/04