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Publication numberUS2201403 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1940
Filing dateApr 10, 1939
Priority dateApr 10, 1939
Publication numberUS 2201403 A, US 2201403A, US-A-2201403, US2201403 A, US2201403A
InventorsKnaust Henry E
Original AssigneeVita Sales Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice-cream scoop
US 2201403 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 21, 1940 H. E. KNAus'T 2,201,403

ICE-CREAM SCOOP Filed April 10, 1939 R" "i4 Pis' 37 les 405k,

INVENTOR HENRY E. KNAUsT ATTORNEY Patented May 21, 1940 PATENT OFFICE ,y

10E-CREAM scoor Henry E. lKnaust, St.

Louis, Mo., assignor to Vita Sales Corporation, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application April 1o, 1939, serial No. 266,935

14 Claims.

This invention relates to a certain new and useful improvement in ice-cream scoops and has for its primary objects the provision of a unique ice-cream dispensing scoop or serving implement,

which is capable of gathering or taking up a serving'portion or so-called predetermined load of ice cream or the like without compacting the same or otherwise materially aiiecting or altering its normal density, which is power-driven and conveniently usable without producing undue fatigue, which is durable and substantially unbreakable during the course of normal use, which will produce successive serving or load portions of the cream or confection having substantial constant or uniform shape, density, and homogeneity, and which is speedy in operation, economical in cost of construction and maintenance, and eilicient in the performance of its intended functions.

And with the above and other objects in view, my invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of parts presently described and pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawing- Figure 1 is an elevational View of an ice-cream scoop constructed in accordance with and embodying my invention;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal view of the scoop, taken approximately along the line 2 2, Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an inverted plan view of the scoop;

Figures 4 and 5 are transverse sectional views of the scoop, taken approximately along the lines 4--4 and 5 5, respectively, Figure 2;

Figure 6 is a reduced perspective view of one of the jaws or segments of the scoop; and

Figure 7 is a schematic wiring diagram oi the electrical connections of the scoop.

Referring now more in detail and by reference characters to the drawing, which illustrates a preferred embodiment o my invention, A designates the ice-cream scoop generally, which includes an open-top cylindrical shell or housing I having an end or bottom wall 2 centrally enlarged or thickened in the provision oi a bearing boss 3 `transversely apertured, as at 4, and annularly grooved, as at 5, for receiving a bearing ring Si of Oilite or other suitable' preferably antiiriction material.

At its open-end peripheral margin, the shell I is rabbeted, as at 1, for receiving a dome-shaped closure cap 8, which is preferably detachably secured to the shell I by screws or other suitable fastening means9 and preferably apertured, as

at In, and suitably formed or provided with a vretention ring II for receiving a conventional two-wire electrical conduit or cord I2, all as best seen in Figure 2 and for purposes presently, fully appearing.

suitably disposed and mounted in the shell or casing I, is a prime mover in the form preferably of a compact high-speed electric motor I3 preferably of the conventional A. C.D. C. type, having a projecting auxiliary block I4 of dielectric 10 material providing opposed lugs or contact-supports I5, I6. I

Fixed upon the lug` I5, is a conductive connector strip I'I provided at its one or so-called inner end with a suitable contact button I8 and at its 15 other or so-called outer end with a radially inwardly presented flange I9 to which is suitably fixed one end of a spring-leaf circuit breakerv arm or blade 2U provided at its free swingable end with a contact button 2| for circuit-complet- 20 ing or closing engagement with a xed contact 22 securely mounted on the` opposed lug I6 and an opposed contact 23 for circuit-making engagement with an auxiliary xed contact 24 mounted on a support or bracket 25, in turn, xed upon 25 the inner face of the end cap 8.

Intermediate its ends, the blade 20 is pro-.- vided with a magnetic plug or insert 26 forelectro-magnetic co-operation with -a small circuitbreaking electro-magnet or solenoid 21 suitably 30 secured to a supporting bracket 28, in turn, also fixed within and upon the end cap 8, al1 as best seen in Figure 2 and for purposes presently fully appearing.

Shiftably mounted in and extending through 35 the side wall of the `casing or shell I, is a preferably dielectric switch actuator 29 provided at its outer end with a preferably rounded nger button` 3l) and at its inner end with a diametrally enlarged abutment 3I for engagement with 40 the free swingable end of a spring-leaf switch plate 32 xed at its lower end to the shell I and provided at its free end with a contact button 33 for circuit-completing or closing engagement with the contact I8, all as best seen in Figure 2. 45

suitably disposed around the outer face of the shell I and cap 8, is a relatively heavy overall sheath 34 preferably oi vulcanized rubber or other suitable dielectric material for insulating thek operator or user from accidental shock 50 or injury due to leakage of electric currents and also for preventing the ingress of water, moisture, or other deleterious agents to the motor and electrical parts within the casing or shell I.

The motor I3 has a tubular or quill-type shaft 55 35, which is preferably equipped with an overall molded sheath of Bakelite or other suitable dielectric substance and extends axially outwardly from the shell I through the end-wall aperture 4 and bearing ring 6 and at its outer extremity is diametrally enlarged in the provision of a cylindrical shank 36 having a pair of diametrally opposed longitudinal slots 3l.

Swingably attached as by pins or the like 't and normally disposed lengthwise within the slots 31, is a pair of suitably elongated arms 39 normally urged to project obliquely outwardly relatively to the shank 33 by means ofinverted V-shaped leaf-springs 4o operably mounted within and at the base of the slots 37, the arms 39 being normally retained in the slots 3l againstY the bias of the springs 4i! byv means of a thimble 4I mounted on the shank 36Y for axially shiftable movement into and out of embracing engagement with the arms 33, as best seen in Figure 2.

Welded or otherwise fixed upon the respective free ends of they arms 39, is a Acompanion pair of co-operable scoop segments or bowls 42 preferably in the form of quarter spheres having opposed matching margins 43 semi-circular in contour in end elevation, as best seen in Figure 6, and centrally recessed in the provision of a clearance aperture 44 and preferably integrally formed at their lower open end with inwardly presented helically shaped cutting flanges or blades 45 disposed in'oppo'site non-matching directions somewhat after the manner of a propulsion screwfall as best seen in Figures l, 2, and 6. e

Slidably mounted in and `extending through the bore of the tubulal` or quill-type motorshaft 35, is a push rod 4S diametrally enlarged at its one or inner end in the formation of a stop shoulder 4'!l and provided with a cap or button 48 preferably of any suitable dielectric material. Welded or otherwise fixed upon the opposite or outer end of the push rod 46 and extending symmetrically `thereabout for more or less snug-fitting engagement at its periphery with the respective inner faces of the segments or bowls 42, is a relatively thin flexible metallic disk or plate 49, all as best seen in Figure 2 and for purposes presently appearing.

By referenceto the wiring diagram, Figure 7, it'will be seen that one of the electrical leads in the cord I2 is connected directly to the solenoid or magnet 21'and the motor I3, and that the other electrical lead of the cord i2 is connected to the switch-leaf 32. The circuit breaker blade is electrically connected to the contact button I B, the other pole of the solenoid 2l being connected to the contact button 24 land the other pole of the motor I3 being connected to the contact buton 22. i

In operation andfuse, the thimble 4i is normally shiftedk axially on the shank 3G into embracing engagement around the arms 39, the bowls or segments 42 being hence in closed or ice-cream scooping position, as shown in Figure 2, and theY circuit to the motor I3 broken, the contact 33 being `out of electrical engagement with the contact I8.

Upon the finger button 39 being depressed, theswitch actuator 29' will be shifted inwardly and contact 33 shifted into circuit-making or closing engagement with the contact i8. By reason of the fact that the flexible metallic plate 49'is' in straight or undeformed position,y the push rod 46 will be held in outwardly shifted position with its dielectric knob or button 48 out of engagement with the circuit breaker blade or arm 2B, the contacts 2| and 22 being hence in circuitclosing engagement and the circuit to the motor I 3 being thus completed.

Upon being energized., the motor I3 rapidly rotates the shaft 35 and the associated segments or bowls 42, and when the rotating segments or bowls 42 are lowered into the ice cream or rother like frozen confection, the helical cutting flanges or blades 45, co-operatively acting in the manner of a propulsion screw, will very rapidly gather and feed a continuous stream of'ice cream into the segments or bowls 42 with a very slight compacting force sufficient' to render the contents of the bowls homogeneous and uniform, but insufcient to alter the density of the ice cream or other confection. As the bowls `42 become lled, the scooped or gathered ice cream or other confection presses against and upsets or deforms, as it may be said, the flexible metallic plate 49, the push rod 46 being thereby shifted longitudinally and the dielectric end knob 48 thereof engaged with the circuit breaker arm 2l) and the contact 2i, in turn, being shifted out of circuitmaking engagement with the contact 22. The circuit to the motor I3 is thus immediately broken and rotation` of the bowls 42 discontinued. As the circuit breaker arm 20 is deflected upwardly by such movement of the push rod 46, the contact 23 is brought into circuit-making engagement with the contact 24, completing the circuit to the solenoid 2, which thereupon becomes energized and magnetically holds the circuit breaker blade 20 in upwardly deilected position, maintaining interruption of the circuit to the motor i3 even though the operator has neglected or inadvertently omitted to remove his finger from the switch button 30. On the other hand, in the event the operator removes circuitclosing finger-pressure on` the button 3B, then the circuit will be immediately broken both to the motor I3 and solenoid 2l, any necessity then for maintaining the circuit breaker blade 2G in upwardly deflected position being eliminated.

When the so-called predetermined amount or load of ice-cream has been gathered by and into the bowls 42 and the motor I3 is automatically shut off, the thimble 4I may be shifted retrogressively along the shank 36, whereupon the arms 39 and the associated bowls 42 will be kshifted angularly outwardly under influence of and economically constructed and efciently ful-y fills in every respect the objects stated.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, construction, arrangement, and combination of parts of the scoop may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent isl. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a pair of companion bowls co-operably shiftable for closing and opening for receiving and discharging a quantity of ice cream, each of said bowls being provided with inwardly extendinghelical flanges co-operably positioned with respect to each other for propelling said quantity of ice cream into-the bowls.

2. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a shaft, a pair of companion bowls cooperably hinged on the shaft for swingably opening and closing for receiving and discharging a quantity of ice cream, spring means for yieldingly actuating the bowls to open position, and a thimble shiftable on the shaft for bowl engagement for retaining the bowls in closed position against the tension of the spring means.

3. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a pair of companion relatively shiftable rotary bowls normally closed for gathering and holding a quantity of ice cream, each of said bowls being provided with inwardly extending helical flanges co-operably positioned with respect to each other for propelling said quantity of ice cream into the bowls upon rotation thereof.

4. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in `combination, a rotary shaft having a pair of diametrally opposed recesses opening upon the side and end face of the shaft, an arm swingably mounted in each of said recesses and projecting outwardly at an end from the end face of the shaft, and a pair of companion bowls co-operably mounted on the projecting ends of the arms, and rotatable with the shaft.

5. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a rotary shaft having a pair of diametrally opposed recesses opening upon the side and end face of the shaft, an arm swingably mounted in each of said recesses and projecting outwardly at an end from the end face of the shaft, a pair of companion bowls co-operably mounted on the projecting ends of the arms, and rotatable with the shaft, and means for releasably retaining the bowls in closed load gathering and holding relation.

6. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a rotary shaft having a pair of diametrally opposed recesses opening upon the side and end face of the shaft, an arm swingably mounted in each of said recesses and projecting outwardly at an end from the end face of the shaft, a pair of companion bowls co-operably mounted on the projecting ends of the arms, and rotatable with the shaft, and means operably mounted for movement on the shaft for releasably retaining the bowls in closed load gathering and holding relation.

y'l'. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a rotary shaft having a pair of diametrally opposed recesses opening upon the side and end face of the shaft, an arm swingably mounted in each of said recesses and projecting outwardly at an end from the end face of the shaft, a pair of companion bowls co-operably mounted on the projecting ends of the arms, and rotatable with the shaft, and means for releasably retaining the bowls in closed load gathering and holding relation, the bowls being provided with blade means for gathering the load into the bowls. y

8. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a rotary shaft, a pair of companion bowls co-operably hinged on, and rotatable with, the shaft, and means for releasably retaining the bowls in closed load gathering and holding relation, the bowls being provided with helically shaped co-operable cutting flanges for gathering the load into the bowls.

9. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a rotary shaft, a pair of normally closed companion bowls co-operably hinged on, and rotatable with, the shaft, co-operable blades on the bowls for gathering the load into the bowls during rotary actuation thereof, electrically operable means for rotarily actuating the shaft and bowls, and means for automatically disconnecting the shaft and driving means upon the gathering into the bowls of a predetermined load.

l0, An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a rotary shaft, a pair of normally closed companion bowls co-operably hinged on, and

rotatable with, the shaft, co-operable blades on the bowls for gathering the load into the bowls during rotary actuation thereof, power-operated driving means for actuating the shaft and bowls, and means including a push-rod for automatically disconnecting the driving means and shaft upon the gathering into the bowls of a predetermined load.

11. A scoop comprising a hollow handle, an electric motor operably mounted in the handle, circuit-breaking means mounted in series with the motor, a shaft drivingly connected to the motor and extending axially from the handle, load gathering and holding bowls operably mounted on the shaft, and means for actuating the circuit-breaking means for interrupting the current to the motor upon the gathering into the bowls of a predetermined load.

12. A scoop comprising a hollow handle, an electric motor operably mounted in the handle, a swingable circuit-breaker arm mounted in series with the motor, a quill-shaft drivingly connected to the motor and extending axially from the handle, a pair of companion bowls co-operably hinged on the shaft, a push-rod shiftably mounted in the quill-shaft, said rod having one end disposed within the bowls and its other end disposed for abuttingly engaging said arm, and means within the bowls for shifting said rod outwardly with respect to. the bowls for causing said arm. to interrupt the current to the motor.

13. A scoop comprising a hollow handle, an electric motor operably mounted in the handle, a swingable circuit-breaker arm mounted in series with the motor, a switch in series with said arm, a quill-shaft drivingly connected to the motor and extending axially from the handle, a pair of companion bowls co-operably hinged on the shaft, a push-rod shiftably mounted in the quill-shaft, said rod having an end disposed within the bowls and its other end disposed for abuttingly engaging said arm, means within the bowls for shifting said rod outwardly with respect to the bowls for causing said arm to interrupt the current to the motor, and electro-magnetic means for holding said arm incurrent interrupting position while said switch is closed.

14. An ice-cream scoop comprising, in combination, a supporting member, a pair of normally closed companion bowls co-operably hinged on the supporting member, each of the bowls being provided with inwardly extending blade-like flanges for gathering and holding a quantity of ice cream in the closed bowls, and a flexible member operatively mounted in the bowls and extending transversely across the line of separation therebetween in opposed juxtaposition to the bowl flanges for forcing the gathered ice cream out of the bowls upon separation thereof.

HENRY E. KNAUS-T.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439125 *May 19, 1944Apr 6, 1948Noel Bolinger GeorgeIce-cream scoop
US2629344 *May 4, 1950Feb 24, 1953Bruce Maxwell KeatonPortable frozen confection dispenser
US4420948 *Mar 12, 1981Dec 20, 1983Savage Don HApparatus for dispensing hard ice cream and the like
US4707997 *Jan 27, 1986Nov 24, 1987Bigler Mont DSystem and method for dispensing frozen foods
US6863520 *Jul 1, 2003Mar 8, 2005Craig A. StilesAuger scoop
US7393200 *Oct 6, 2005Jul 1, 2008Jeon Sunnie KElectromotion ice-cream disher
EP1963062A2 *Oct 27, 2006Sep 3, 2008Bradshaw International, Inc.Scoop for ice cream and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/150, 37/184, 425/280, 425/283
International ClassificationA23G9/04, A23G9/28, A47J43/00, A47J43/28
Cooperative ClassificationA47J43/282
European ClassificationA47J43/28C