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Publication numberUS2202839 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1940
Filing dateMay 4, 1936
Priority dateMay 4, 1936
Publication numberUS 2202839 A, US 2202839A, US-A-2202839, US2202839 A, US2202839A
InventorsDavidson Glenn
Original AssigneeDavidson Glenn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarette mouthpiece
US 2202839 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. DAVIDSON 7 2,202,839

CIGARETTE MOUTHPIECE Filed. May 4, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 40 I V E G; DAVIDSON 2,202,839

CIGARETTE MOUTHPIECE Filed llay 4, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 June 4, 1940. v s0 2,202,839

CIGARETTE MOUTHPIECE Filed May 4, 1936 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 'fii. 3.15.

GLENN DAVIDSEIN W- a 4 y Patented June 4, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Glenn Davidson, Aurora, Ill. Application May 4, 1936, Serial No. 77,889

6 Claims.

This invention relating as indicated to cigarette mouthpieces is more particularly directed to in individual mouthpiece plugs.

Such mouthpieces or inserts have been used to some extent for preventing the coming into direct contact with the tobacco from mouth, for

avoiding the waste of tobacco otherwise contained in the end of the cigarette which is thrown away, and, more particularly, when composed of fire resistant material, for the purpose of preventing the smoldering of the discarded end and consequent danger of fire. While the desirability of such devices is recognized, particularly for the purpose last referred to, they have not come into general use, partly because as heretofore devised their manufacture has involved considerable trouble and expense, adding materially to the cost of the cigarette, and partly have resulted in changes in because they the characteristics of the cigarette to which the public has become accustomed.

The present invention has for one object to provide a mouthpiece or plug of this general character which can be produced in quantities and incorporated with the cigarettes during the manufacture of the latter by commercially practicable methods without adding to the cost of the cigarettes, and which will permit the cigarette to draw naturally and will, when inserted between the lips of the user,

be substantially indistinguishable to the senses from the ordinary cigarette to which the smoker has become accustomed.

A more detailed object of the invention is to provide a ribbon of mouthpiece material which may or may not have an envelope but in any event which has cellulosic material in some form which acts as a filtering medium.

have been shown may or may not be stances laminations of paper in which the laminations adhesively united one to the other.

I In some in- In other instances the filtering medium may consist of woven material or a mass of adhesively united cellulose fibers.

It isalso possible to use round strands or separate relatively narrow strips.

It is a still further provide a ribbon of such as paper or the object of the invention to folded cellulose material, like, it being understood that spaces will occur for the passage of smoke between the folds when the ribbon a plug of circular cross section. To the accomplishment of the related ends, the invention, then,

is formed into foregoing and comprises the (Cl. 93 l) features hereinafter fully described, and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following descrlption and the annexed drawings setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

In said annexed drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a diagrammatic showing of apparatus which may be used to form ribbons of mouthpiece material.

Fig. 2 is a transverse section of one form of ribbon.

Fig. 3 is a transverse section of a modified form of ribbon.

Fig. 4 is a transverse section of another modification of ribbon.

Fig. 5 is a transverse section of still-another modification of ribbon.

Fig. 6 is a transverse section similar to Fig. 4 showing an envelope.

Fig. 7 is an elevation of one of the glue rollers shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 8 is a transverse section of a ribbon composed of woven material.

Fig. 9 is a plan view taken from above and greatly enlarged of Fig. 8.

Fig, 10 is a side elevation diagrammatically shown of apparatus which may be used to form a ribbon having an enclosing envelope.

Fig. 11 is a transverse section of a ribbon which may be formed by means of the apparatus shown in Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 is a modification of Fig. 11.

Fig. 13 is a modification of Fig. 11.

Fig. 14 is another modification of Fig. 11.

Fig. 15 is still another modification.

Fig. 16 is a transverse section of the pull belt shown in Fig. 10.

Fig. 17 is a perspective view with parts broken away of a cigarette having a mouthpiece formed from the ribbon shown in Fig. 5.

Fig-18 is a view similar to Fig. 17 in which the mouthpiece is formed from a ribbon of the character shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 19 is a side elevation of apparatus diagrammatically illustrated in which the ribbon shown in Figs. 20 and 21 may be produced.

Fig 20 is a transverse sectional view of a ribbon which may be produced by the apparatus shown in Fig. 19.

Fig. 21 is a modification of Fig. 20; and

Fig. 22 is a diagrammatic showing of one means of forming channels in the upper surface of the ribbon shown in Fig. 5

Referring now to the drawings, and especially Fig. 1, series of drums I, 2, 3, 4 and 5 is shown from which webs 6, I, 8, 9 and ii! are respectively drawn to form a ribbon of the character shown in Fig. 4. In this ribbon the laminations 'l, 8 and 9 are united to each other and to the outer plies 6 and ill by means of adhesive that is applied from the rollers H, l2, l8 and Hi. The adhesive is contained in reservoirs l5, 16, ll and i8 and each of these reservoirs is preferably provided with an adjustable scraper blade is so as to wipe all of such adhesive from the outer surface of the rollers leaving a small amount in each of the grooves 29 and 2! The result of this construction is that glue or other adhesive is applied to the webs of cellulosic material, such as paper, in a thin line.

The webs just described are drawn through the forming tube 22, thus uniting each of the laminations one to the other. This drawing through is accomplished by means of the pull belt 23 and the ribbon in final form is drawn up to form a roll 24.

In Fig. 2 the laminations 25, 26, 21, 28 and 29 are adhesively united in much the same manner as the webs shown in Fig. 1 and this form of ribbon difiers only from that shown in Fig. 4 by width of the various webs. It may be desirable in some instances to provide a ribbon in which the laminations decrease in width from the bottom to the top as this may render the folding operation less diificult.

In Fig. 3 I have shown a transverse section of a ribbon somewhat similar to that shown in Fig. 4 but in which the laminations 3!, 32, 33, 34 and 35 are enclosed in two webs somewhat wider than the laminations so as to form an envelope. The two webs are adhesively united by means of suitable lines of adhesive material 31 and 38.

Fig. 5 shows a section of a ribbon which consists of a backing 39 and a mass of cellulosic fibers 4B. This mass may be formed much in the manner of a product now on the market sold under the trade name of Balsam Wool. This material is deposited on the backing 39 and the adhesive contained therewith serves to unite the fibers into a matted mass and at the same time to unite the mass to the backing.

The rollers shown in Fig. l are more fully illustrated in Fig. 7 in which the roller I l is provided with two circumferential grooves the purpose of which is to apply an adhesive material in two lines upon the webs shown in Figs. 2, 4 and 6.

The ribbon shown in Fig. 6 is similar to that shown in Fig. 4 except that it is provided with an envelope, the details of which will be discussed more fully hereinafter.

In Fig. 8 I have shown sectionally a ribbon composed of a backing 4! which has a filtering medium associated therewith which in this instance takes the form of woven material. Preferably, this woven material is made from warp strands 43 having a round configuration, and weft strands 44 having the same shape, all of said strands preferably being composed of a cellulosic material such as paper.

The apparatus diagrammatically illustrated in Fig. 10 consists of a series of rolls of cellulosic material 5!, 52, 53, 54, and 55 from. which the webs 56, 5?, E8, 59 and 60 are drawn into the forming tube 6:. In this tube a line 62 of adhesive material is applied by means of the glue roller 63 which in this instance is provided with a single groove and differs in this respect from the roller shown in Fig. 7. The glue in reservoir 65 is scraped from the major portion of the roller 63, after being applied to the same, by means of the adjustable blade 64. If desired, some such heating means as shown diagrammatically at 66 may be associated with the forming tube El, and the assembly is drawn through the forming tube by means of the pull belt 67. The ribbon thus formed may be coiled about a drum to form a roll 68.

It is not believed necessary to show details of the mechanism for forming the envelope 60 as this is divisible subject matter that can be treated in a separate application. The envelope 60 is formed by appropriate guides in the forming tube 50 as to completely enclose the laminations 56, 51, 58 and 59. A sectional view of a ribbon thus formed is shown in Fig. 12.

In Fig. 11 the envelope 69 is dififerent in geometrical cross section from that shown in Fig. 12 due to the fact that the laminations in Fig. 11 increase progressively in width from the top to the bottom of the ribbon. In some instances this may be advantageous as rendering the folding operation less difficult. The envelope 69 may have its edges sealed by means of a line of adhesive material 62 similar to the envelope 60 and this may be true of the other envelopes shown in the various modifications.

In Fig. 13 the envelope 70 is formed similar to the envelope Gil but in this instance the envelope contains a filler of absorbent material II which may be composed of Balsam Wool or the equiv alent.

In Fig. 14 an envelope 72 similar to those shown in Figs. 13 and 14 has a filler of round strands 13 which are preferably made of cellulosic material such as paper.

The envelope 14 shown in Fig. 15 has a filler of separate narrow strips of cellulosic material such as paper and these are arranged at random within the envelope.

The fabrication of ribbons of geometrical cross section to be later compressed to circular cross section in the cigarette machine dilTers from the fabrication of round mouthpiece rods in some respects. First, since only very slight compression is required in the ribbon, a relatively fragile absorbent wrapper may be used if a wrapper is desired. Second, if the paper pull belt is to be allowed to encircle the ribbon it cannot be of the same type as that used in forming round rods as well as cigarettes themselves, for such a belt would tend to compress and distort the ribbon from geometrical cross section. This is undesirable for many reasons. First, it places the wrapper or the freshly applied glue, holding the layer together, under strain. Secondly, a rod held in a compressed condition tends to be rigid longitudinally and cannot readily be wound on to spools without damage as can an uncompressed ribbon. Accordingly, the material must be carried through the forming tube either on a fiat belt or a series of individual belts, i. e., one for each side of desired geometrical cross section must be used. With suitable guides these can all be carried on the same drums or a specially designed single belt as I have shown in Fig. 16 may be used. Such a belt must fold at sharp angles to form a tube of the desired cross section. In order to accomplish this my belt, generally indicated at '16 in Fig. 16, is composed of sections "l8, i9, 8G, 3! and 82 which are hingedly connected one to the other so as to form an envelope rectangular in cross section. It will be understood that the envelope 69 shown in Fig. 11

would require a belt slightly different in cross section. The various sections of the belt 16 may be secured to each other in any desired manner as this figure is intended to be merely a diagrammatic representation.

In Fig. 17 I have illustrated a complete mouthpiece cigarette in which a. plug 86 and section of tobacco. 84 are enclosed by a wrapper 85. The openings 83 having a tear drop cross section are formed by means shown in Fig. 22.

Fig. 18 depicts a cigarette similar to that shown in Fig. 17 but in which the mouthpiece plug is formed from the ribbon shown in Fig. 4.

In Fig. 19 a web of cellulosic material IB is drawn beneath a central forward guide en which folds the web longitudinally and centrally thereof. The web encounters a second set of guides, one of which 9|, is shown, and then encounters a third pair of guides, one of which 92, is shown. In this way the web assumes the general shape shown in Fig. 21 in the forming tube 93 where adhesive may be applied by means of the adhesive rollers 94 and 95 to produce the ribbon shown in Fig. 21. In the event that it is desired to produce a ribbon having an envelope the drum 9'! from which the web 96 is drawn may be used in association with the apparatus shown in Fig. 19. The envelope 96 is withdrawn from the roll 91 and folded around the folded Web 89 and, if desired, adhesive 98 may be applied by either of the drums 94 and 95, depending upon the location of roll 91.

The use of a material such as Balsam Wool or the like may in some instances result in a mouthpiece which does not have a proper draft, and I have therefore provided means of insuring a draft resistance which may be controlled. One manner of accomplishing this is disclosed in Fig. 22 in which a mass of cellulose fibers 86 are provided with channels 83 in the upper surface of such mass by means of the fly cutters 81. The backing 88 is sufficient to hold the matted mass 86 in place during such cutting operation and the channels 83 will be given a U formation. This U formation will be changed to what may be called a tear drop section, as shown in Fig. 17, when the ribbon is folded to assume a circular cross section.

The cigarettes shown in Figs. 17 and 18 may be assembled in some suchmanner as that shown in my Patent No. 1,963,076 issued June 19, 1934.

From the foregoing it will be seen that I have provided a ribbon of mouthpiece material which can be very inexpensively manufactured and which can be rolled about a drum without any damage whatever to such ribbon. Furthermore it will be noted that I have provided a ribbon which may be continuously made thus rendering the cost of production comparatively low so that the individual mouthpieces severed from. such ribbon are low in cost and the resulting mouthpiece cigarette can be manufactured for less cost than a conventional cigarette because of the substitution of low cost mouthpiece material for relatively expensive cigarette tobacco.

It will be noted that I have used the term "ribbon throughout the preceding description and it should be understood that this term has been arbitrarily selected to define a composite flat member as distinguished from a rod having a circular cross section.

Heretofore circular rods have been used but a ribbon has certain advantages over a rod, the most important of which is the flexibility in usage of the ribbon. In the first place a ribbon can be manufactured in a paper mill close to the source of supply and then shipped to a cigarette factory on reels, where it can be incorpo-. rated with tobacco to form a mouthpiece ciga rette. mouthpiece rod of indefinite length. Such rods must be made on the cigarette machine, orif made at the paper mill or other remote point, they must be severed at such place and shipped in short lengths which necessitates a hopper mechanism for feeding the same. 'On the other hand the reel of mouthpiece ribbon can be conveniently shipped and severed at the cigarette machine.

Another advantage of the ribbon type of mouthpiece material is that highly absorbent fragile material may be used particularly as the envelope or wrapper member, whereas in a round rod the envelope or wrapper must be relatively heavy and seldom is absorbent.

The term Balsam Wool has been used for lack of a better term to define a matted mass of cellulose fibers and it is to be understood that the invention is not to be restricted to this specific material. In fact Balsam Wool itself is too crude for a mouthpiece as the fibers. are relatively large and the backing is too coarse. This term is meant to include all equivalent materials such, for example, as blotting paper which is readily susceptible to grooving and bending.

It is to be understood that the tear drop channel shown in the drawings is only one example of the draft passage that may be formed and the invention is not restricted to that particular form. The exact form of channel will depend in part upon the channel initially formed in the ribbon and in part upon the compression to which the ribbon is subjected.

The method of grooving shown will, of course, be understood to be merely an example of one method of forming channels in the filler ribbon material and it will be further understood that such channels may be formed by cutting, compressing, embossing, other equivalent means, or such channels may be formed in the sheet at the time of manufacture.

The glue rolls from which the webs are drawn in Figs. 1 and may be separately powdered and synchronously driven with the paper pull belt in order to prevent rupture or breakage where fragile material is used in the webs.

The forming tubes shown. in Figs. 1, 10 and 19 will have a cross section that conforms with the desired configuration.

The internal bore of the forming tube is tapered from a width at the entrance equal to the width of the envelope web to the width of the desired ribbon at the exit end. This taper is so formed that belt shown in Fig. 16 is first folded, from its flattened or extended form, at the two. innermost hinges to form a three sided trough of which the sides are at right angles to the bottom, then subsequently the belt is folded at right angles at the two outermost hinges to form the rectilinear enclosure shown in Fig. 16.

Other modes of applying the principle of my invention may be employed instead of the one explained, change being made as regards the device herein disclosed, provided the means stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated means be employed.

I therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention:

1. In a method of making mouthpieces for However, this is not the case with a T cigarettes the steps which comprise applying an adhesive to spaced locations on webs of cellulosic material, superimposing such webs one upon another, and enclosing said webs in an envelope to form a ribbon and then bending said ribbon along longitudinal lines to form a mouthpiece plug of circular section,

2. In a method of making mouthpieces for cigarettes the steps which comprise applying an adhesive to spaced locations on Webs of cellulosic material, and superimposing such webs one upon the other to unite the same to form a ribbon and then bending said ribbon along longitudinal lines to form a mouthpiece plug of circular section.

3. In a method of making mouthpieces for cigarettes the steps which comprise providing webs of cellulosic material, superimposing such webs one upon another, and enclosing said webs in an envelope, to form a fiat ribbon of mouthpiece plug material and then bending said ribbon to form a mouthpiece plug of circular section.

4. In a method of making mouthpieces for cigarettes the steps which comprise applying an adhesive to spaced locations on webs of cellulosic material, and superimposing such webs one upon the other to unite the same, to form a fiat ribbon of mouthpiece plug material and then bending said ribbon to form a mouthpiece plug of circular section.

5. In a method of making mouthpieces for cigarettes the steps which comprise super-imposing webs of cellulosic material one upon the other, then enclosing said superimposed webs in an envelope, then uniting portions of said envelope to form a closed covering for said webs, to form a flat ribbon of mouthpiece plug material and then bending said ribbon to form a mouthpiece plug of circular section.

6. In a method of making mouthpieces for cigarettes the steps which comprise providing webs of cellulosic material, uniting said webs along longitudinal lines, said lines running parallel to the direction in which the Webs extend and being spaced transversely of said webs thus forming a fiat composite ribbon then bending said fiat ribbon along longitudinal lines to form mouthpiece plug material of circular section having substantially uniform draft passageways.

GLENN DAVIDSON,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2685344 *Jun 14, 1950Aug 3, 1954Cigarette Components LtdFilter plug for cigarettes
US2707308 *Dec 6, 1949May 3, 1955British CelaneseMethod of making a filter element
US2765515 *Oct 7, 1953Oct 9, 1956H & V Specialties Co IncMethod of making a filter for tobacco smoke
US2780573 *Feb 5, 1954Feb 5, 1957Glenn DavidsonCigarette filter construction
US2882801 *Jul 19, 1954Apr 21, 1959Cav LtdMachine for use in the manufacture of paper filters
US2900989 *Jan 26, 1955Aug 25, 1959Glenn DavidsonCigarette filter tip
US2905184 *Aug 19, 1955Sep 22, 1959Olin MathiesonFilter for tobacco smoke
US2916039 *Jan 22, 1957Dec 8, 1959Adolf Muller PaulFilter for tobacco smoke
US2931364 *Nov 22, 1957Apr 5, 1960Adolf Mueller PaulRod-shaped filter element
US2931748 *Apr 18, 1955Apr 5, 1960Adolf Muller PaulCrimped flat material for filter plugs for cigarettes
US2964440 *Feb 9, 1955Dec 13, 1960 Process for preparing tobacco smoke
US3039908 *Jul 13, 1953Jun 19, 1962Hollingsworth & Vose CoMethod of making a tobacco smoke filter
US3094450 *Jun 5, 1959Jun 18, 1963Glenn DavidsonMethod of making a cylindrical filter element for cigarette tips
US3253967 *Dec 18, 1962May 31, 1966Du PontProcess for producing foam cigarette filters
US4514180 *Jul 6, 1982Apr 30, 1985Brown & Williamson Tobacco CorporationMethod of making filter for a cigarette product
US4889143 *May 14, 1986Dec 26, 1989R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette rods and filters containing strands provided from sheet-like materials
US4903714 *Aug 25, 1987Feb 27, 1990R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanySmoking article with improved mouthend piece
US5025814 *May 12, 1987Jun 25, 1991R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette filters containing strands of tobacco-containing materials
US5076295 *Sep 29, 1989Dec 31, 1991R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette filter
US5105834 *Nov 6, 1990Apr 21, 1992R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette and cigarette filter element therefor
US5246017 *Jun 5, 1992Sep 21, 1993R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyCigarette and cigarette filter element therefor
DE1032693B *Dec 4, 1953Jun 19, 1958Eastman Kodak CoVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Herstellen von Filterelementen fuer Tabakrauch
DE1082845B *Aug 3, 1954Jun 2, 1960Paul A MuellerFilter fuer Tabakwaren, insbesondere Zigaretten
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/44, 131/361, 131/340, 292/DIG.300, 131/61.1, 493/50
International ClassificationA24D3/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S292/03, A24D3/02
European ClassificationA24D3/02