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Publication numberUS2203155 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 4, 1940
Filing dateMar 29, 1939
Priority dateMar 29, 1939
Publication numberUS 2203155 A, US 2203155A, US-A-2203155, US2203155 A, US2203155A
InventorsJohn E Jullien, Jullien Leon
Original AssigneeJohn E Jullien, Jullien Leon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Card holder
US 2203155 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J1me 1940- v JULLIEN ET AL 2,203,155

CARD HOLDER Filed March 29, 1939 INVENTORS LEON JL/LL/EN JOHN E. .7" LL/EN THIJ/Z ATTORNEY Patented June 4, 1940 v UNITED STATES CARD HOLDER.

Leon Jullien and John E. Jullien, Orcutt, Calif.

Application March 29,

3 Claims.

Our invention relates to a card holder for protecting and detachably holding an identification card on an automobile battery while it is being re-charged or undergoing other repairs.

It is among the objects of our invention to provide an identification card holder which is acid resisting and noncorrosive; thereby providing the maximum protection for the identifying card held therein.

Another object is to provide a simple unitary construction which aids in the easy attachment and detachment of the pocket to a battery.

A further object is the provision of a pocket providing a tight recess for frictionally retaining 15 an identification card therein.

The invention possesses other objects and fea-' tures of advantage, some of which, with the foregoing, will be set forth in the following description of our invention. It is to be understood that we do not limit ourselves to this disclosure of species of our invention, as we may adopt varient embodiments thereof within the scope of the claims.

Referring to the drawing:

Figure l is a perspective view of our preferred form of holder.

Figure 2 is a perspective view illustrating a variant means for attaching the pocket to a battery.

'Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken in a plane indicated by the line 3--3 of Figure 1.

Figure 4 is a View illustrating our preferred form as it appears when attached to an ordinary storage battery; and

Figure 5 is a perspective view illustrating another means ior attaching the pocket to a battery.

In the battery servicing industry a battery, upon being removed from an automobile, is usual- 1y placed on the service bench, for re-charging or other repairs, with a great many other batteries. It is diflicult at this time to identify any particular one, because one battery looks very much like another. The ordinary pasteboard tag, commonly in use as a record card, is frequently so burned or discolored by acid that it is useless. As a result the record of the owner'of the battery is destroyed, leading inevitably to an undesired substitution of a different battery for the one left by the customer. Our improved acid resisting holder protects the identification card and thereby insures a legible record of ownership at all times.

In terms of broad inclusion, the identification holder embodying our invention comprises a 1939, Serial No. 264,762

pocket for holding an identifying card, and means for attaching the pocket to a battery. The pocket is preferably made of rubber, or-one of the synthetic or other substitutes; and the attaching means is preferably a band of the same material 5 and of a size to slip tightly around a battery with the pocket on the exposed face thereof. The recess in the pocket is arranged to provide a tight fit to frictionally resist any accidental loss of the inserted tag or card.

In greater detail, and referring to the drawing, the holder embodying our invention comprises a rubber pocket formed by front and back walls, 2 and 3 respectively. The walls are preferably vulcanized, or otherwise sealed, about 1 three of their edges, the upper edges being left open to provide a slotted opening 4 for an identification card 6. The two Walls lie approximately flat so as to grip the card for holding it in place. The back wall-3 preferably extends above 20 the front wall to provide a backing for the card 6, and aids in its insertion into the pocket. The card may contain such desired information as the owners name, last repair date, and charging data.

Attached to the back wall along its side edges, 25 and preferably slightly below the slotted opening 4, is a resilient band 1 of such a size as to be conveniently stretched around the body of a battery 8 as illustrated in Figure 4. We prefer to make this band of rubber because of its acid re- 30 sisting qualities, and the ease with which it may be attached to the wall 3, as by vulcanizing.

A construction such as that shown in Figure 2 may be used with good advantage. A tongue or strip 9 is formed as an extension of the back wall 35 3, and has a length sufiicient to position the upper portion of the tongue near one of the battery terminals II. A slot I2 is provided for placing the tongue over the terminal, thus allowing the pocket to hang down over the exposed face of the battery so that the inserted card is in a convenient position for inspection.

Figure 5 illustrates another embodiment of our invention wherein a pair of spring fingers I3 is provided on the pocket to clip onto two sides of the battery. A rubber covering 14 over the fingers prevents corrosion of the latter due to spilled acid.

We claim:

1. A battery identification holder comprising two sheets of acid resistant material lying face to face and secured along three edges to form a pocket for receiving an identification card, said sheets forming unbroken front and back walls for 55 the pocket to protect the enclosed card against attack by acid, the back wall sheet having an extension to provide a protective backing for the card above the pocket opening, and means connected with one of said sheets for attaching the pocket to the battery.

2. A battery identification holder comprising two sheets of acid resistant material lying face to face and secured along three edges to form a pocket for receiving an identification card, said sheets forming unbroken front and back walls for the pocket to protect the enclosed card against attack by acid, the back Wall sheet having an extension to provide a protective backing for the card above the pocket opening, and a band connected with one of said sheets for encircling the battery to hold the pocket thereon.

3. A battery identification holder comprising two sheets of acid resistant material lying face

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2846796 *May 16, 1957Aug 12, 1958Ross Inc WillIdentification band
US2990639 *Jul 10, 1959Jul 4, 1961David W Van GiesonTelephone number indexes
US3214852 *Apr 9, 1963Nov 2, 1965FordPersonally carried card holder
US3430297 *Oct 30, 1967Mar 4, 1969Weier Jerilynn HStoring phonograph records
US3491470 *Aug 7, 1967Jan 27, 1970Thomas & Betts CorpIndicia supporting device
US4713900 *Dec 10, 1984Dec 22, 1987Calloway Jr LutherBowl emblems
US4781315 *Sep 12, 1986Nov 1, 1988Nordskog Erik RDetachable wristband carrier
US6006460 *Sep 26, 1997Dec 28, 1999Blackmer; Larry AlanGame tagging system and method of use thereof
US6085449 *Jan 15, 1998Jul 11, 2000Comprehensive Identification Products, Inc.Armband badge holder
US6189968 *Jun 15, 1998Feb 20, 2001Richard A. EmanuelLounge and chair saver
US6238122 *Mar 1, 1999May 29, 2001Exhaust EtiquetteDisplay device and method therefor
US6594928 *Jun 16, 1999Jul 22, 2003Burrell E. ClawsonApparatus to identify information on containers
WO2000076857A2 *Jun 16, 2000Dec 21, 2000Clawson Burrell EApparatus to identify information on containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/665, 224/277, 224/222, D19/90
International ClassificationH01M10/42
Cooperative ClassificationH01M10/42, Y02E60/12
European ClassificationH01M10/42