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Publication numberUS2204686 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1940
Filing dateJun 25, 1937
Priority dateJun 25, 1937
Publication numberUS 2204686 A, US 2204686A, US-A-2204686, US2204686 A, US2204686A
InventorsLitle Jr Thomas J
Original AssigneeEasy Washing Machine Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Leg construction
US 2204686 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1 8, 1940. J LlTLE, JR 2,204,686

' LEG CONSTRUCTION Filed June 25, 1937 l GD I7 -l2 /24 I If 27 TTEI'RNEY Patented June 18, 1940 PATENT OFFlCE LEG CONSTRUCTION Thomas J. Litle, Jr., Syracuse, N. Y., assignor to Easy Washing Machine Corporation, Syracuse, N. Y., a corporation of Delaware Application June 25,

3 Claims.

My invention relates to new and useful improvements in leg structures and protecting means therefor, particularly suitable for use in washing and ironing machines.

An object of my invention is to provide a leg structure, particularly suitable for usein washing machines, which is simple in construction, pleasing in appearance and economical to manufacture.

Another object of my invention is the provision, in a washing machine, of means for minimizing the possibility of marring the porcelain exterior of the washing vat thereof.

A further object of my invention is to provide simple means for protecting the leg of an arti- "C18, such as a washing machine, from being marredupon being bumped against an object.

More specifically, my invention contemplates the provision of a novel ,leg structure and pro- 20 tecting means therefor, particularly suitable for a washing machine, wherein the legs are provided with longitudinally extending rods which project outward, somewhat beyond the adjacent surface of the leg so that when the leg is bumped 35 into an object such as a wall or rinse tray, the force of the blow isreceived upon the metal rods instead of the leg itself, so that marring of the leg is prevented.

Other objects and advantages of my invention .will be more apparent from the following descrip tion when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing a washingmachine supported on suitable legs in which my novel means of preventing marring of the legs is embodied. Figure 2 is a view taken on the line 2--2 oi Figuregl, showing the means by which the leg may be attached to the skirt of the washing machine and showing the method of attachment which may be employed to secure the protecting rods to the leg.

Figure 3 is a view taken on the line 3--3 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a view showing the top of the leg and indicating the manner in which the metal rods are secured to the top ofthe leg.

Figure 5 is a view showing a portion of the bottom of the leg and indicating the manner in whichthe metal rods are secured to the bottom of the leg.

, Figure 6 is a perspective view showing a washing machine in which the legs extend upward along the sides of the washing machine vat to a 5 point adjacent the top thereof.

1937, Serial No.150,375

The novel leg construction and protecting means therefor of my invention is embodied in a washing machine, although it will be understood that my invention is equally applicable to the leg structures of other articles, particularly ironing machines. The washing machine, comprises a washing vat II in which is mounted suitable means for washing clothes (not shown). Beneath the vat is a skirt l2 which has an inwardly directed flange at its upper edge (not shown) upon which the vat is seated. A rubber ring I3 is interposed between the inwardly directed flange of the skirt and the bottom of the vat. The depending skirt hides from view the operating mechanism for the agitator. A clothes wringer I4, mounted on a post I6, is suitably supported from the washing machine. A suitable cover I! is providedfor the washing machine vat.

As is usual practice in washing machines, the exterior of the washing vat is of porcelain which chips very easily. The skirt I 2 and the legs l8 are enamelled either in the same color as the porcelain of the washing vat or ina contrasting color. The legs of the washing machine are secured to the skirt in a manner presently described and are bulged outward beyond the side walls of the washing vat, as shown in the drawing, so that in the event the washing machine is pushed against a wall, rinse tray or other object, the legs of the machine will act as a buffer and, in the majority of cases, receive the bump instead of the porcelain side walls of the washing vat. This substantially minimizes the likelihood of the porcelain washing vat, in use, becoming chipped.

Since each of the legs is the same, a description of one will suflice. In my novel leg structure, the bottom of the skirt is turned inwardly, as indicated at l9. In the side wall of the skirt is provided a slot 2|. The upper end of the leg, as indicated in Figure 4, has a lug 22 adapted to be inserted in the slot 2!. The sides of the leg 23, at their inner edges 26, engage the side walls of the skirt and adjacent the curved portion IQ of the skirt are curved inward, as indicated in Figure 2 at 25, on a curve corresponding to the curve l9, so that the lower edge of the skirt is partially supported on the curved portions of the legs. i

The inside of the leg is provided with a bracket 26. A nut and bolt assembly 21, extending between the bracket and inner side wall of the skirt, serves to secure the leg to the skirt. A spacer 28, concentric with the bolt, prevents the side wall of the skirt from being distorted upon tightening of the nut.

' videcL.

As will be apparent from the drawing, the front face 36 of the leg extends well beyond the wall of the vat II and the skirt 12 which, itwill be noted, are in substantially the same vertical plane. Consequently, when the machine is moved on its casters 3?! and is accidentally bumped against a wall, rinse tray or other object, the force of the bump is taken on the leg of the machine so that the possibility of striking the vat and marring the porcelain exterior thereof is substantially minimized. Since the legs of the machineare particularly exposed and prone to being struck by bumping them against objects, it is desirable to provide some means of protecting the legs to prevent them from or minimize the possibility of their becoming dented and particularly to protect the enamel surface thereof. I have provided a novel and exceedingly simple way of accomplishlng these objects.

As will be observed from Figure 3, the front face of the leg is provided with a plurality of longitudinally extending grooves or depressions 38 which give the appearance of a fluted leg construction. Extending longitudinally of the leg and lying in certain of these grooves are rods 39, preferably of metal, which are of sufiicient diameter to project outward beyond the adjacent surface of the leg so that when the machine is pushed against an object the shock of the bump is absorbed by the metal rods instead of the leg itself. It will be appreciated that it is not necessary that the rods lie in grooves as the leg could be provided with a smooth facing surface. The primary reason for grooving the legs is to give the legs a fluted appearance. However, to a certain extent, the grooves provide recesses for the reception of the rods so that they are less likely to be bent sidewardly. In the drawing, I have shownbut two rods, although a larger number of rods could be used. The reason for using but two rods is that two rods, when enamelled in a color contrasting to the color of the leg, for example, black rods on a white leg, gives the leg a pleasing appearance. Two rods are suificient to protect the leg unless a deliberate attempt is made to strike a portion of the leg against an object. j

The rods may be secured to the legs by any suitableumeans. I have shown herein a method by which this may be easily and simply accomplished. In the top of the leg, as indicated in Figures 2 and 4, a pair of apertures 4| are pro- The upper ends of the rods are bent, as indicated at 32. The bent portions of the rods are inserted in the apertures ll which effectively secures them to the leg at the top. The rods are then bent down along the outside of the leg, as shown in Figure 2, to the bottom thereof. At the bottom, the leg is provided with slots 33. The lower ends of the rods are placed adjacent the slots t3 and bent, as indicated at M, and rebent, as indicated at 46, so as to retain the rods in position on the legs. The lower end of the side walls 23 of the legs are extended toward each other, as indicated at B1, and overlapped so that the bottoms of the legs are substantially circular in cross section. The overlapping portions may then. be Welded together.

Thus far I have described a leg construction in which the legs are secured to the skirt and do not extend upward along the sides of the vat. However, if desired, in order to better protect the porcelain exterior of the washing vat, as shown in Figure 6, the legs may be extended upward along the side walls of the washing vat substantially to the top thereof.

It will be appreciated that I have provided an exceedingly simple and inexpensive method of I claims.

I claim:

1. A sheet metal leg for a washing machine or the like having its upper end substantially halfround with the side edges thereof adapted to fit flush against a vertical side wall of the structure to be supported, whereby said leg projects beyond said structure and tends to protect the same, said leg having a rounded outer surface throughout its length, a vertical lug at the extreme upper end of said leg adapted to project through an aperture in said vertical side Wall and be located therebeyond to assist in securing said leg to said side wall, an aperture in the top of said leg adjacent the. base of said lug and arranged so as to lie immediately adjacent'said side wall in a substantially vertical position when the leg is in place thereon, a substantially vertical groove in said leg extending from near said aperture to the bottom of said leg, a notch in said leg at the bottom end of said groove, and a round metal rod. lying in said groove and projecting beyond the surface of said leg and having a bent portion at its upper end extending through said aperture and a retroverted portion at its lower end extending through and above the back of said notch, whereby said rod is firmly secured in place, gives the appearance of extending the entire length of said leg and serves to protect the leg against scufling in service.

2. A sheet metal leg for a washing machine or the like comprising a deep substantially U-shaped channel having at the upper end thereof an end flange merging into the web and side flanges of said channelysaid flanges being adapted to fit I beyond said structure and tends to protect the same, a vertical lug at the extreme upper end of said leg adapted to project through an aperture in said vertical side wall and be located therebeyond to assist in securing said leg to said side wall, an aperture in the top of said leg adjacent the base of said lug and arranged so as to lie immediately adjacent said side wall in a substantially vertical position when the leg is in place thereon, a substantially vertical groove in said leg extending from near said aperture to the bottom of said leg, a notch in said leg at the bottom of said groove, and a round metal rod lying in said groove and projecting beyond the surface of said leg and having a bent portion at its upper end extending through said aperture and a retroverted portion at its lower end extending through and above the back of said notch, whereby said rod is firmly secured in place, gives the appearance of extending the entire length of said leg and serves to protect the leg against scufling in service.

3. A hollow sheet metal leg for a washing machine or the like comprising two side flanges and a connecting web, an end flange merging into said side flanges and said web and located at the upper end of said leg, said flanges being adapted to fit flush against the side of a structure to be 19 said rod, and a notch in theweb portion of said leg located at the lower end of said groove and at the lower end of said leg adapted to receive a retroverted portion of said rod, said rod being provided with a bent over portion at its upper endpro-jecting into said aperture and a retroverted portion at its lower end projecting through said notch and above the end of said notch, and said rod extending substantially the full length of said leg.

THOMAS J. LITLE, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5368263 *Jun 11, 1993Nov 29, 1994Harrison; Guy W.Water heater stand
US5685509 *Nov 15, 1995Nov 11, 1997Harrison; Guy WayneWater heater stand
US5820087 *Nov 10, 1997Oct 13, 1998W.H. Safety Products, Inc.Ignitable appliance stand
US6216990Nov 6, 1997Apr 17, 2001W. H. Safety Products, Inc.Retrofit pan and water heater stand
US7426934 *Oct 13, 2004Sep 23, 2008Premark Feg L.L.C.Angular support element for a dish-washing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/146
International ClassificationD06F1/00, D06F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F1/02
European ClassificationD06F1/02