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Publication numberUS2204861 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1940
Filing dateJan 14, 1938
Priority dateJan 14, 1938
Publication numberUS 2204861 A, US 2204861A, US-A-2204861, US2204861 A, US2204861A
InventorsKnapp Archer L
Original AssigneePackard Motor Car Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motor vehicle antenna
US 2204861 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 18, 1940.

A. L. KNAPP MOTOR VEHICLE ANTENNA Filed Jan. 14, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR A TTORNEYS.

A. L. KNAPP I 2,204,861

MOTOR VEHICLE ANTENNA Filed Jan. 14, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V E N T OR flrcer A. @4222 A T T ORNE Y5.

Patented June 18, 1940 UNITED STATES rac sm.

PATENT OFFICE MOTOR VEHICLE ANTENNA Application January 14, 1938, Serial No. 185,027

6 Claims.

This invention relates to radio receiving apparatus and more particularly to such apparatus for use on motor vehicles.

It is a general practice with motor vehicles having sheet metal bodies to provide a radio receiving apparatus in which the antenna is located as far from the body as possible in order that body interference is minimized. One of the most popular arangements now being used is a rod type of antenna that is extended above the body, and the greater distance that the rod projects from the body the greater is its capacity to receive from distant points of transmission. Due to obstructions and interferences'encountered in city driving, a short rod is usually required, so in order to provide for city and country driving an antenna having telescoping sections is now being utilized. However, lengthening and shortening of such an antenna must now'be obtained by grasping the rod extension and pulling or pushing it into desired position. As the antenna is exterior of the body, the operator must either stop and get out of the vehicle or reach through the window in order to adjust the antenna and this an objectionable operation as well as a dangerous one in some instances.

An object of this invention is to overcome the mentioned objections to a telescoping antenna by providing mechanism that can be manipulated from within a vehicle body to vary the antenna length.

Another object of the invention is to provide mechanism operable from within a vehicle body that can be operated to selectively swing'the antenna into a position above or beneath the body top, or to vary the length of the antenna.

A further object of the invention is to provide an antenna mounting at the front of a vehicle body such that the antenna can be swung out of the vision of occupants of a vehicle in a position in front of the windshield when not in use.

Still another object of the invention is to provide mechanism that can be turned from within a vehicle body for either swinging a rod type antenna or varying its length.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the following description taken in connection with the drawings, which forms a part of this specification, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view showing a front portion of a motor vehicle with an antenna incorporating the invention associated therewith in parked relation;

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the antenna swung into receiving position for city driving;

Fig. 3 is a similar view showing the antenna swung into receiving position and extended for country driving;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view through the front of a vehicle body showing the antenna structure incorporating the invention in section;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view through the antenna structure taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is another sectional view of the antenna structure taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a vehicle body with the antenna associated therewith in parked position;

Fig. 8 is a sectional view of the antenna structure taken on line 8-8 of Fig. '7;

Fig. 9 is another sectional View of the. antenna structure taken on line 9-9 of Fig. '7

Fig. 10 is a sectional view of the antenna structure taken on line lll--lll of Fig. 7;

Fig. 11 is a sectional view taken on line ll- -ll of Fig. '7; I

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a vehicle body having a modified form of antenna structure associated therewith;

Fig. 13 is a sectional-view of the modified form of antenna structure taken on line l3-|3 of Fig. 12.

The invention .is shown associated with a closed type of motor vehicle metal body indicated generally at 28. The forward part of the roof structure terminates in a header element 2i and has a header frame element 22 associated therewith, such elements are continued and fixed together as a frame structure 23 for the windshield 24. The windshield is of the divided type and center frame strip 25 extends vertically thereof and is secured at its upper and lower ends to the frame 23.

The radio receiving antenna structure, forming the subject matter of this invention, is preferably associated with the body header in a relation such that when not in use the exposed portion can be parked in front of thecentral frame strip 25 without interfering with vision through the windshield. Such relation of the antenna is preferable but it can be located at other places on the body. In the antenna structure, as shown in Figs. 1 to 11 inclusive, are included two relatively movable rod sections, a base section and an extension section. These sections are'preferably arranged in a telescoping relation so that the extension section can be projected from or retracted into the base Section.

The base section is composed of a hollow head portion 28 into which a tube 29 extends and is fixed. Substantially coextensive with the hollow tube and carried therein is a drive tube 35 having a spiral groove extending lengthwise thereof and a bevel gear 3| is fixed to the end projecting into the hollow head portion 28. The antenna extension section 32 is in the form of a rod having a pin 33 fixed near the inner end thereof for engaging in the spiral groove in the drive tube 30.

As previously related, the antenna is so arranged that it can be parked, when not in use, in front of the windshield frame section 25, as shown in Figs. 1 and '7, so that it will not interfere with vision through the windshield, and it is furthermore pivotally mounted so that it can be swung upwardly to a position projecting above the top of the body as shown in Fig. 2. In order to so swing the antenna I provide a mounting therefor at the front end of the roof structure and provide mechanism associated with the mounting whereby the antenna can be swung into operative or parked position. Rubber gaskets 34 project through openings in the roof header structure and support the tube 35, such tube being formed preferably of insulation material. Extending through this tube and gaskets is a shaft 35 projecting into the hollow head. 28, and fixed thereon in the head is a bevel gear 31 in mesh with gear 3!. Fixed to the outer gasket 34 is clutch element 38 with which another clutch element 39 cooperates, the last mentioned clutch element being fixed to the hollow head 28. The tube 35 is fixed to the outer rubber gasket and the clutch element 38 is fixed to the outer gasket by pins 43. Clutch element 38 is formed with recesses 4| for the reception of teeth 42 on the clutch element 39. The outer gasket has a flanged portion bearing against the outer roof structure and it is held in place by a nut 43 screwed onto the inner threaded end of the tube, such securing means clamping the gaskets against the spaced roof header elements.

Shaft 36 extends into the interior of the body and has fixed thereon a knob 44. Washers 45 and 46 are arranged on such shaft between the inner end of the tube 35 and the knob, the washers being spaced by the coil spring 31. The washer 46 is fixed to the shaft and the engagement therewith by the coil spring normally urges the shaft 36 toward the interior of the vehicle body in which position the two clutch elements are in engagement so that the base section of the antenna will be held in fixed position. By pushing the knob toward the exterior of the vehicle body the two clutch elements 38 and 39 will be separated, whereupon by turning the knob the antenna will be swung about its pivot to place it in parked position, as shown in Fig. 1, or in reeciving position above the vehicle roof, as in Fig. 2. The engagement of gears 3| and 31 provides the driving connection between the shaft 38 and the base section of the antenna when the clutch elements are released so that turning of the shaft will rotate the antenna.

I propose to utilize this same mechanism for projecting and retracting the extension section of the antenna relative to the base section. When the clutch elements are engaged, as shown in Fig. 4, turning of the knob 44 will rotate shaft 36 and gear 31 transmitting rotation to the spirally grooved tube 30 through means of gear 3|. Rotation of the tube 30 will move the rod 32 inwardly or outwardly of the antenna base section because pin 33, being fixed to the rod and engaging in the spiral groove in the tube 30, can be screwed to project the rod from the base section, as shown in Fig. 3, or to retract it, as shown in Fig. 4. Thus it will be seen that rotation of shaft 36 will selectively swing the antenna about its pivot and will project or retract the extension section of the antenna depending upon whether or not the clutch elements are in or out of engagement.

The hollow head of the base section of the antenna is formed of two sections 50 and 5!, as shown in Figs. 7 and 8, secured together by screws 52, and clamped between such sections is one end of the tube 29. The clutch element 39 is suitably fixed to the outside face of the inner head member 50. Near the lower portion of the windshield frame element 25 is welded a bracket 53, and carried on this bracket is a rubber retainer member 54 having a recess 55 formed therein for receiving tube 29 of the antenna base section when in its parked position. This rubber retainer member serves as a rest for the free end of the antenna and prevents its contacting with the windshield structure when not in use. The clutch elements will be engaged when the antenna is in its upper or lower vertical position and serves to secure the antenna in either of such positions when outward pressure against the knob 44 is released.

In Figs. 12 and 13 there is illustrated a modified form of the invention which diifers mainly 111;.

from the form of the invention previously described by the provision of individual mechanisms for turning the antenna about its pivot and for projecting or retracting the extension section of the antenna from the base section.

The tube 55 is supported by the gaskets 34 in a similar manner as the tube 24 of the other embodiment of the invention but it is rotatable in the gaskets. The forward end of this tube is screwed into section 52 of the hollow head of the base section of the antenna and the inner end of the tube projects interiorly of the body and has a knob 56 fixed thereon. Washers 51 and 58' are arranged upon tube 55 and are spaced by coil spring 59. The washer 58 is fixed to the tube 55 and the spring serves to normally move tube 55 inwardly of the body thereby engaging the clutch elements which are similar to those previously described. By pushing outwardly against knob 56 the tube 55 is moved outwardly to disengage the clutch elements whereupon the knob 56 can be rotated to swing the antenna about its pivot.

Extending through the tube 55 is a shaft 60 and mounted on the inner end of this shaft is a knob 61 by means of which such a shaft can be rotated independently of tube 55. On the outer end of this shaft 60 is the gear 3'! arranged in the hollow head of the base section as previously described, and this gear meshes with gear 3|, as previously described, to drive the spirally groove tube 30. In this form of the invention the extension section of the antenna is in the form of a rod 62 having spaced pins 63 fixed thereon and extending into the spiral reative positions by the manipulation of manually operable means engageable within the body of a motor vehicle, and similarly the antenna can be lengthened or shortened as may be desired for city or country driving from the interior of the vehicle body by manual operation.

Although the invention has been described in connection with specific embodiments, the principles involved are susceptible of numerous other applications which will readily occur to persons skilled in the art. The invention is therefore to be limited only as indicated by the scope of I I mechanism including a clutch operable to selectively move the base section or the extension section relative to the base section.

3. An antenna for motor vehicles comprising a pivotally mounted base section, a clutch for securing or releasing said base section, an extension section carried by the base section and movable in a telescopic relation therewith, mechanism operable from the interior of the vehicle to control the clutch and swing said base section, and means driven by said mechanism when said clutch is engaged for extending and retracting said extension section relative to said base section.

4. An antenna for motor vehicles comprising a pivotally mounted hollow base section, a clutch for fixing or releasing the base section, a shaft operable from within the vehicle for releasing said clutch and swinging said base section on its pivot, an extension section carried by said base section, and mounted to be moved inwardly and outwardly thereof, and mechanism connected to drive said extension section inwardly and outwardly of said base section, said last mentioned mechanism being operated by said shaft.

5. In an antenna structure, a pair of telescoping members located exterior of the vehicle, a manually operable shaft extending through a wall 01 the vehicle and fixed at its outer end to the outer telescoping member, said shaft being mounted for rotary and axial movement, drive means connecting the shaft with the inner telescoping member for projecting and retracting the same, and clutch means associated with said outer telescoping member, said clutch means being normally engaged to lock said outer member against rotation and released by axial .movement of the shaft.

6. In combination with a motor vehicle having a windshield frame dividing strip, an antenna comprising telescoping sections pivotally mounted on the vehicle to be swung above the vehicle or to be parked in front of said frame :5

strip, and means operable from within the vehicle for swinging said sections and for projecting and retracting one of said sections relative to the other.

ARCHER L. KNAPP.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2492529 *Apr 29, 1949Dec 27, 1949Video Television IncTelevision antenna
US4663632 *Jan 28, 1985May 5, 1987Barker Manufacturing Company, Inc.Extendable directional dipole antenna
US5440315 *Jan 24, 1994Aug 8, 1995Intermec CorporationAntenna apparatus for capacitively coupling an antenna ground plane to a moveable antenna
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/110, 74/405, 343/714
International ClassificationH01Q1/10, H01Q1/08
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/103
European ClassificationH01Q1/10B