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Publication numberUS2205437 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1940
Filing dateSep 21, 1935
Priority dateSep 21, 1935
Publication numberUS 2205437 A, US 2205437A, US-A-2205437, US2205437 A, US2205437A
InventorsWilliam A Ringler
Original AssigneeNat Folding Box Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Merchandising package
US 2205437 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 25, 1940. w. A. RIINGLl-:R

' vmamcmmn'slrwr PACKAGE Filed sept'. 21. .1935

AT1-ORNE W. A. RINGLER IIERCHANDISING PAGKAGE June 25, 4'1940.

Filed Sept. 21, 1935 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 ffl? kr I' ATTQRNEYSQ June 25, 1940. w. l.RlNcsm-:R 2,205,437

MERCHANDISING PACKAGE' Filed sept. 21, 1935 S sheets-sheet 5 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Patented June 25, 1940 PATENT ori-*ical* MERCHANDISING PACKAGE William A. Ringler, Wayne, Pa., millier to National Folding Box Cdmmny. New Haven.

Conn., a corporation New Jersey' Application September 21, 1935, Serial No. 41,526

This invention relates to a merchandising package and more particularly to a packagev for a plurality of articles, each article being sepi arately and individually dispensed by the merchant by separating the package into predetermined article-containing segments when a customer calls for one of the articles.

Heretofore it has been customary to dispense merchandise, such as electric light bulbs, radio tubes, batteries, spark plugs and other small ardise being passed offfin his containers as his own. Individual due to their multiplicity, are also expensive to pack, store and handle and greatly increase the cost of taking stock inventory due to the fact that each item must be separately counted and often inspected to make sure that the container contains the proper article in good condition;

It is one of the objects of this invention to overcome the deciencies of merchandisingcontainers above noted and to providea package conlals ,1,0 a merchandise package in "stick form which.

can be broken into segments by the merchant to taining a plurality of articles which can be handled, stored and inventoried as a unit, but which can be easily broken or separated into predeter-A mined segments, as the merchant sells the same to a customer, each segment containing one or more articles.

Another object of this invention is to provide individually dispense thev article contained in each segment as the customer` calls for it, said package being constructed and sealed as to prevent unauthorized removal of the contents c011- tained therein. A

Another object of this invention is to provide a sealed 4container for merchandise from which the contents cannot be removed without leaving visible evidence of tampering Still another object of this inventionis to provide an improved container for 'electric light bulbs, radio tubes and similar' articles liable to injury/from shock having meansfor supporting the article in` spaced relation to the side walls containers .heretofore used.

(Cl. 20G-56) v of the outer container so that shock delivered to the outer container will -not be ytransmitted to thearticle.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved container for light bulbs, radio tubes, batteries and similar articles requiring test examination before delivery to the customer, -in which the article may be sealed against unv authorized removal and yet provision made to permit ejection of the test end of the article so that the desired test can be performed prior to sale and delivery of the article to the customer.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved method and apparatus for sealing the merchandise packages 'herein disclosed.

Other objects of this invention will become apparent as the disclosure proceeds,

Although the novelrfeatures which are be lieved to be characteristic of this invention will be particularlypointed out in the claims appended hereto, the inventionitself, as to its objects and advantages, and the manner in which it may be carried out, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof, in which Fig. l shows a blank of paperboard suitably cut and scored to form the outer container portion of the merchandise package;

Fig. 2 shows a blank which has been suitably cut and scored to provide an inner container or sleeve for the article merchandised; Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the inner con- -tainer or sleeve assembled from theblank shown in Fig. 2 showing, for purpose of illustration, an electric battery positioned therein;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a plurality of inner containers with a battery contained'in each, said inner containers being arranged in A juxtaposition and about to-Dbe surrounded and enclosed by the glued outer container forming blank shown in Fig.l l; f

, Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the merchandising package as completely assembled, a segment of said package being shown partiallysevered to illustrate hcw the individual articles may be separately and individually deliveredby the merchant to the customer; v

' Fig. l6 shows a paperboard blank suitably cut and scored to form an outer container of some- -what modiiied form;

Fig. 'I is a perspective view of the blankshcwn in` Fig. 6 completely assembled and enclosing a plurality of electric light bulbs each individually contained in an inner protective shell or sleeve:

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary perspective view of the assembled outer container illustrating particu- `larly how the same can be, closed and sealed to prevent-unauthorized opening of the container;

Fig. 9 is a transverse cross sectional view through the fully assembled merchandising package, this view being taken on line 9--8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 10 shows a blank from which an outer container of further modified form may be made;

Fig. `11 is an exploded perspective view of the merchandising package, this view showing particularly a plurality of aligned inner protective shells each lcontaining an electric light bulb with an outer container forming blank shown in Fig. 10, partially surrounding the same;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of the fully assembled merchandising package assembled from the Aporting member for a plurality of delicate articles,

such as light bulbs and the like;

Fig. 14 shows a blank from which an outer container may be made, this outer container individual inner containers.

being used to surround and enclose the cushion supporting member formed from theblank shown in Fig. 13;

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary perspective view of the cushion supporting member formed from the blank shown in Fig. 13 about to be inserted into the outer container formed from the blank shown in Fig. 14, certain parts being broken away to more clearly illustrate certain features of the construction;

Fig. 16 is a transverse cross sectional view of the merchandising package as it appears whenV the innerl containers or sleeves to the outer container;

Fig. 18 is an enlarged transverse cross sectional view through the upper gluing Aarms taken along lines lil-I8 of Fig. ,17, this view illustrating more particularly the manner in which the -glue is applied to the inside face of the outer container;

Fig. 19 is an enlarged fragmentary cross sectional view through one of the gluing arms of the apparatus, this view being taken on line Iii-i9 of Fig. 20; y

Fig. 20 is an enlarged fragmentary face view of one of the gluing arms showing particularly the glue escape opening and theA automatic closure therefor, this view being taken on line 2li- 20 of Fig. 18; and p Fig. 21 is a diagrammatic view oi' a gluing apparatus of somewhat modified form which can be used to apply glue to the outside faces of the Similar reference1 characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the -drawings and thespeciilcatlon.`

The merchandise package shown' by example in Fig. 5 comprises a plurality of individual inner containers or sleeves each formed from a blank A, shown in Fig. 2, and an outer container enclosing'` a plurality of aligned inner containers 'formed from the blank-B, shown in Fig. 1. 'I'he inner container blank, shown in Fig. 2, comprises side wall forming portions Al defined by scorev lines 2 and a securing tab portion 3 which may sleeve.

be xed by glue or other means to the opposite side wall portion to provide a tubular member or For purpose Vof, illustration, there is shown in Fig. 3,A a small battery T contained therein. It is understood, however, that the inner containers are so designed and shaped asl to conveniently fit the article.

The blank B which forms the outer container, is traversed by a plurality of parallel extending perforaticns 5 which define lines of weakness or 5 and 1, the end wall portions 8 and 9 andthe securing tab portion i0 all defined by parallel extending score lines il. In assembling the package, the inner containers each containing 'i an article of merchandise T are arranged in a row, as shown in Fig. 4. Glue y may be applied to the inside faces of the side walls Sand 1 and to the outside face of the securing tabs I0. The blank B maythen vbe wrapped or folded around the aligned innereontainers so that the glued inside faces of the side walls 5 and 1 will adhere to opposite side walls I of the inner containers and the securing tabs l0 will overlap and adhere to the side walls 1 of the outer container, thus forming a tubular member or sleeve within which the aligned' inner containers are housed and secured. The outer container or blank should be applied in such a manner that the perforated -lines of weakness` or linesI of separation 6 substantially coincide with the line of division between the individual inner containers so that when the lines of weakness 6 are broken to separate the segments, an inner container will beneatly housed within the outer container segment, as illustrated in Figure 5. It will be noted that the articles contained within the finished package'and also the individual articles contained in the separated segments are completely sealed and enclosed against unauthorized removal. 'I'he end portions 8 and 9 of the outer blank serve to seal and close the ends of the tubular inner container. When the articles are thus packaged it is'impossible to remove the article without tearing or defacing the container forming parts and thus leave visible evidence of tampering. A sealed and substantially foolproof package for a plurality of articles comprising sealed and substantially foolproof segmental containers for individual articles is thus provided.

To facilitate separation and division of the merchandising package into separate individual container segments it has been found helpful to actually cut through the material of the outer container at one or two adjacent corners as at I4. 'I'hese cuts are sufficient to permit the merchant to continue the separation of the segments along the lines of weakness 6 without difilculty. 'I'he merchandising package, however, can be handled as a unit and can easily contain from ,six to ten or twelve or even vmore separate articles as found convenient. The merchandising packages or units are suiiiciently strong and rigid so that they can be handled, packed and stored without danger of the separate article containing segments breaking off. When stock invencounted andthe total number of separate articles can 'be determined by multiplying the number of package units by the number of unit articles-each package contains. A convenient, ecouol -tory is taken the separate units only need be lill nomical, sealed and substantially foolproof merchandising container is thus provided.

Should it be desirable or necessary to test the article contained in the merchandising package prior to sale to a customer, the outersegmental end walls 8 may be individually provided with a suitable opening' I2 opposite the test end t of the article 'I' contained therein; If desired, an opening I3 may be provided in each of the opposite end wall segments 9 through which an instrument, such as the finger, may be inserted to eject the test end t of the article through the opening l2 a sufficient amount to perform the test. vIt

is understood that in the case of batteries, electric light bulbs, radio tubes and similar electrical devices having test or contact ends, a suitable elect ic` button or socket connected in an electric cir- 't is provided with which the test end of the article is placed in contact. Aneffective and highly efficient merchandising package, highly y adaptable to all requirements, is thus provided.

lWhere articles, such as electric light bulbs, are to be packed in the container, it may be advisable to provide suitable means to protect the bulb or delicate articles liable to injury fromshock, by a suitable cushion means. There is shown in Fig. '7, for purpose of illustration, a somewhat modified form of merchandising container especially adapted for the merchandising of electric light bulbs and similar delicate instruments. The bulb L is contained and housed in a tubular sleeve 20 preferably formed of so-called corrugated paperboard and/whose side walls will absorb exterior shock. The outer blank B1 is similar to the blank Bv shown in4 Fig. l, except in The outer container blank B1 is then wrapped around the corrugated inner sleeves 20 and the securing tabs Il) placed in overlapping position against the outside face' of the side Wall segments 1. The end wall. segments 8 and 9 are each provided with a cut line 24 defining a tab 2i which hinges along the score line Il When the outer container has been wrapped around la plurality of inner tubular sleeves 20, as above described, the tabs 2| can be folded inwardly against the adjacent inside face of the corrugated sleeves 20, as clearly shown in Figs. 7 and 9. A staple 23, a rivet, a line of stitching or other permanent securing means may then be stitched through each hinged tab 2l, the securing tab I0 vand the intermediate side wall and/orthe intermediate side wall of the corrugated shell 20 so as to permanently seal and lock the inner tubular sleeve within the outer container. The inner tubular sleeves 20 are arranged in the outer container in such a manner that the lines of separation 6 in the outer container substantially coincide With the lines of division between th`e adjacent inner shells 20. Separation of the merchandising package into individual segments can be facilitated kas heretofore suggested by providing cut lines M which extend through the material of the outex` container at one or more corners. 'I'he openings left by the removal of the tabs 2l from the end' walls 8 and 9 can be used to facilitate and permit ejection of the test end t of the bulb. It will be noted that any shock delivered to the side walls of the outer container will be to a large extent absorbed by the inner corrugated shell and will not be transmitted to the delicate bulb L. The bulbs are preferably alternately arranged in reverse position within the package, as shown in Fig. 7, to further re- I duce the possibilities of breakage.

A further modified merchandising package for electric light bulbs and similar articles liable to become damaged from shock'is illustrated in Fig. 12.- The inner containers or sleeves 20 are formed from shock absorbing corrugated paperboard and each is adapted to contain a single light bulb L. The outer container forming blank Bz, as shown in ,'Fig.'10, is substantially similar to the outer container forming blank B shown in Fig. 1. The

blank Bc may be wrapped around a plurality of aligned inner article-containing sleeves in' the marmer heretofore described, Vor the blank B2,

ymay rst be assembled into tubular form by gluing the securing tabs ,lil to the opposite side wall l, and thereafter telescoping the Vindividual inner article containing sleeve 20 into the outer container or sleeve.

If desired, a continuous line of weakness 21 deiining a punch out area 26 may be provided age may be separated into one or more individual article-containing segments by the merchant at the time the customer calls for one or more of the articles. The inner tubular sleeves or shellsv may bexed to the outer container by means of strips of glue g deposited on the inside face of the outer container either before the blank is assembled intocontainer form or after the inner tubular sleeves have been positioned '.vithin the assembled outer container. An improved apparatus for gluing and securing the inner containers or sleeves Within the outer container will be described hereafter.

There is shown in Figs. 15 and 16 a merchandising package of further modied construction so designed Aas to cushion the articles contained therein against shock. It is therefore especially adapted for the packaging of electric light bulbs, radio tubes and other delicate instruments of different sizes. This container comprises more particularly an inner article-supporting member A3 rwhich is telescoped into an outer containerforming sleeve B3 formed from the blank shown in Fig. 14. The inner article-supporting member is traversed vby a plurality of parallel extending perforated lines of weakness B, each defining a separable segment supporting an individual light bulb L. The individual segments each comprise spaced leg portions 30 and 3l and a hammock portion 32 hinged' to the leg portions along the score lines 33. When assembled the leg portions 30 and 3| are placed in erect vertical position as shown in Figs. 15 and 16 and the hammock portion 32 sags therebetween. The lower por-' tion l1 of the bulb L is preferably inserted through a suitable opening in the hammock portion which is formed by providinga'pair ofl parallel cut lines 36 and .3L-anda transverse' cut line 38 connecting the cut lines 36 and 31. These cut lines define a pair of ears 39 which can be forced downwardly so as to provide an opening therebetween. AThe ears 39 are so shaped and ar' blank Ba assembled into tubular form as shown in Fig. 15, receives the inner supporting member having the bulbs L mounted therein. It Will be noted that the legs l3l! and 3| of the inner supporting member are of sufficient height to snugly fit within the outer tubular container and the outside face of the legs and 3| is surfaced with glue which will adhere to the inside face of the side walls 5 and of the outer tubular container to permanently seal the parts together. The inner support member is positioned within the outer tubular member so that the lines of Weakness 34 traversing the inner support member substantially coincide with the lines of weakness 5 which traverse the outer container. To facilitate separation of the merchandising package into separate article-containing segments, it may be desirable to provide a cut line which extends through the material of the hammock portion 32 as clearly shown in Hgs. 13 and 15. It may be desirable to similarly provide a cut line i4 which extends across the end wails 3 of the outer container. The individual segments can then be easily broken oi by the merchant by applying a slight bending pressure to the package, or if necessary, a simple knife or similar tool can be provided to effect the separation.

The lcontainer above described is remarkably adapted for the packaging of electric light bulbs and especially light bulbs of smalldimensions such as are used for automobile lighting. It will be noted that the hammock portion 32 cushions and suspends the bulb L away and out of contact from the surrounding walls of the outer container. No shock short of an actual puncturing of the Walls of the outer container can contact or be injuriously transmitted to the delicate bulb contained therein. The projecting ears 39 grip the lower end L1 of the bulb with a firm friction sothat the package can be placed upside down or in any position without causing the bulb to leave its proper seat within the hammock portion.

The `merchandising containers herein described vcan be economically manufactured on automatic machinery in common use. The blanks forming both the inner and outer containers can be cut and scored in a single operation on a cutting and scoring machine. 'I'he gluing operations can also be performed automatically.- It will be noted that the blanks used are rectangular in exterior outline and there is no waste of paperboard material. The novel merchandising packages herein presented are more economical to manufacture and. assemble than merchandising containers heretofore provided for this purpose. In addition, the -packages herein presented are substantially foolproof in that they prevent unauthorized removal of or tampering with the contents, they permit quick and ready test and examination of the articles without necessitating the removal thereof, they can be more economically handled, packed, stored and inventoried than containers heretofore provided, and the individual articles contained in the package units can be quickly severed 'and removed from the package by the merchant and delivered to the customer in indil orother adhesive to secure the inner and outer containers together in sealed relationship. The

apparatus more particularly comprises spacedis shown inAFi'gs. 17 to 20, inclusive, a novel and improved apparatus for applying glue hollow arms or tubes 5| and 52 applicable to one side of the package, and spaced arms 53 and 54 applicable to the other side ofthe package. The arms are hollow so as to freely permit the flow of glue therethrough and are preferably elliptical orrectangular in shape so that they Vcan easily be inserted between the outer container and the inner containers, as shown in Figs. 17 and 18. A glue escape opening 59 is provided preferably in the outside face of each arm through which 4the glue feeds on to the inside faces of the outer-side Walls 5 and of the outer container. A suitable slide closure 6| is arranged to slide across the glue discharge opening 59. The slide closure 6|- is mounted for sliding movement upon suitable spaced studs or rivets 54 secured to and preferably within each arm. The studs 64 extend through suitable slots 65 in the slide closure 6|' to guide the closure into sliding movement across the opening. The closure Si is limited in its sliding movement by a friction button 62 which extends through and engages the opposite ends and l2 of the opening 59. The closure 6| is normally held in position to close the discharge opening in the glue arms by means of spring elements 66 one end of which is secured to the closure 6| and the other end to a fixed stud 61 extending fromthe arm. Figs. 19 `and20 show the closure 6| as completely closing the opening 59,

the friction button 62 then abutting the edge 12 low tubular arm and is so arrangedl an'd adjusted that when the arms are inserted into and bewhich position the closure 6| will partially uncover the opening and permit the escape of glue therefrom. The buttonGZ will also act to smear or distribute the glue over the wall surface. After the glue arms have been removed from each package, the packages are stacked one upon the other so as to press the glued inside faces of the sidewalls 5 and ofthe outer container into adhesive contact with the side walls ofthe separate inner containers 20. 'I'he inner containers are thusiirmly and permanently glued land united to thevouter container.

The glue arms 5| and 52 on one side of the container and arms 53 and 54 on the otherside of the container may be supplied with glue from a suitable fountain or receptacle 51 supported on a bracket 58. 'I'he glue ows from the receptacle 51 through the supply pipe 56 into the hollow cross arm 55 and thence into the glue arms above described. It is understood that the. glue arms lare preferably arranged in a tilted position so as to facilitate the flow of glue to the outer ends thereof. The glue arms 5|, 5,2, 53, and 54 are made quite flat andknlfe-like in cross section, so that they can be easily inserted between the in- .ner and outer containers without requiring any substantial distortion, stretching or compression of the inner or outer containers. It is understood v' permit enlargementl of the glue arms to more clearly illustrate the construction of the lautoof a modified form of glue applicator especially adapted to coat the outside surfaces of the inner container or sleeve 20 with glue either before or after the insertion of the bulb L or other article therein. In this device glue applicator rolls 13 are rotatably mounted upon suitable spindles 14 rotatably supported by trunnions 15 extending from the side walls of the glue box 1li. Feed rollers 1i rotatably mounted upon spindles 12 fixed to the side walls of the glue box 10 are positioned to rotate in a lake of glue g poured into the glue box. The feed rolls 1i pick up the glue and deposit a film of glueupon the glue applicator roll '13 with which they are in constantl peripheral contact. The applicator roll.13 when rotated in turn applies the glue film deposited ther'eon on to the outside face of the inner container 20 as clearly shown in Fig. 21. The applicator roll 13 is suitably spaced to permit the proper insertion of the container 20 to be glued therebetween. vA suitable crank or other device connected to the rollers 1l and 13 by a suitable gearing orlother means may be used to rotate the same. Preferably, however, the rollers 1l and 13 are journaled and lubricated so that they will be rotated by the frictional contact of the container 20 as it is 3. A merchandising package for a plurality of individual articles including in combination, an outer container of paperboard material having enclosing, side walls, a plurality of inner containersl of paperboard material each having enclosing side walls and an opening at one end thereof, each of said inner containers being lofrom said -outer container and each folded in-I .wardly through the opening in each of said inner containers to embrace the adjacent portion of the adjacent inner container, and means permanently securing each of said tabs to the ad-- jacent Ainner container, said outer container having lines` of weakness substantially coincident withthe lines of division between'said inner containers permitting separation of said package -into predetermined article-containing segments.

pressed downward Vinto contact with the applicator rolls 13. A suitable platform 16 is preferably positioned under the container 2li so as to prevent the container from inadvertently dropping into lthe lake of glue beneath. The platform 16 may be suitably supported from the side walls of the glue box. y

While certain novel features of the invention have been disclosed and are pointed out in the annexed claims, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes may be made by those skilled in the `art without depart-` means securing saidI tab portion to the adjacent inner member, said outer sleeve having lines of weakness substantially coincident with the lines of division between said inner members permitting separation of said package into predetermined article-containing segments.

2. A merchandising container of the character described including, inner tubular sleeves each adapted to receive and contain an article, and

an outer tubular sleeve telescoped over a plu-. A

. 4. A sealed merchandising package for separate vendable articles including .a protective shell for each of said articles, and an outer container having enclosing side Walls surrounding a plurality of said article containing shells. each of said shells having enclosing side walls and open ends with the open ends disposed in abutting relationto two opposite enclosing side walls of said outer container, means for xedly securing l,

said shells to said outer container which cannot be released without leaving visible evidence of tampering, said outer container having lines of separation substantially'coincident with the lines of division between said inner shells whereby said outer container may be broken and separated into separate vendable vsegments each containing 'an article sealed therein, each of said lines of separation comprising a line of small perforations having a long cut line so interposed as to extend over a corner portion of said outer container whereby segment separation may be readily initiated and effected.

5. A merchandising package for light bulbs, batteries, radio tubes and similar articles including a plurality of inner containers each containing a vendable article, and an'outer tubularA container including enclosing side walls surrounding and enclosing said inner containers, means permanently securing each of said inner containers to said outer container including a tab extending from one of said containers folded over and fixed to an adjacent wall of the other container, said outer container having predetermined lines of weakness substantially .coincident with the lines of division between said inner containers permitting separation of said package into predetermined segments so that e'ach segment contains an article sealed therein.

6. A merchandising package for articles requiring test examination before delivery to the customer including a plurality lof tubular inner conltainers each containing a vendable article, and

an outer .container enclosing said inner containers, means for permanently securing each of said inner containers to said outer container, said means including a tab portion extending from one of said containers folded over and seaiedto I an adjacent portion of the other container, .said

outer container having predetermined lines of perforations therein substantially coincident with the lines of division between said inner containers permitting separation of said outer container into predetermined sealed article-containingsegments, and an opening in each of said segments through which'the test end o! the article may be ejected for test purppses.

7. A merchandising container for articles having a test end requiring test before delivery to the customer including inner tubular sleeves each adapted toreceive and contain an article, an outer tubular sleeve telescoped over a plurality of inner tubular sleeves. means for xedly and permanently securing said outer sleeve to each of said inner sleeves. said outer sleeve having lines of separation substantially coincident with the lines of division between the inner sleeves permitting separation of said outer-sleeve into predetermined sealed article-containing ese:- ments, each of said lines of separstins. ccmprising a line of small perioratisns having a ieng cui: line so interposed as to extend over a cerner the outer sleeve whereby segment .separatista he readily initiated and eiectea, a test opening in one Wall cf each segment sciiacent the test end of the article therein, and an ejectinn opening in the opposite wail of each segment into which an instrument may be inserted to eject the test end of the article out through the test opening in position available for test.

8. A merchandising package for light bulbs, batteries, radio tubes or similar articles requiring test examination before delivery to the customer including in combination, a tubular outer container of paperboardmaterial having enclosing side walls and open ends, a plurality o! inner containers of paperboard material having enclosing side walls and open endsv located in said outer container with the ends disposed in a direction transverse to that in which the ends of the outer container are disposed, said outer container having predetermined lines of 4separation substantially coincident with the lines of separation between said inner containers so as to permit said inner and outer containers to be broken into separate segments, each oi said lines of separation comprising a series of small perforations having a plurality of long cuts interposed between said series so arranged that each lcng cut extends overlother side wall ot each segment positioned opposite the opening first-mentioned and into which complementary opening an instrument may be inserted to effect ejection of the test end of the article from the segment.

WILLIAM A. RINGLER.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/422, 229/122.33, 493/110, 206/820, 229/120.12
International ClassificationB65D75/52, B65D75/38, H01M2/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01M2/105, Y02E60/12, B65D75/38, Y10S206/82, B65D75/527
European ClassificationB65D75/52H, H01M2/10C2C, B65D75/38