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Publication numberUS2205956 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 25, 1940
Filing dateJun 26, 1937
Priority dateJun 26, 1937
Publication numberUS 2205956 A, US 2205956A, US-A-2205956, US2205956 A, US2205956A
InventorsFerdinand W Humphner
Original AssigneeMid States Gummed Paper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stamp and method of forming
US 2205956 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 25. 1940. F. w. HUMPH'NER 2,205,955

STAMP AND METHOD 0F FRMING Filed June 26, 1957 Patented June 25, .194@

. UNITED STATES STAMP AND METHOD OF FORMING Ferdinand W. Humphner, Oak Park, Ill., assignor to Mid-States Gummed Paper Co., Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Delaware Application June 26, 1937, Serial No. 150,632

Claims.

This invention relates to a gummed stamp and a method of forming the same. The stamp is 'particularly useful as a revenue stamp for liquor or tax purposes.

Tax stamps, as ordinarily constructed today, can be removed by soaking the container, upon which the stamp is applied, in water. The stamp is removed after the soaking operation and is then pasted on another container and thusre- 10 used. Special adhesives have been employed requiring solvents and the like, which' are not affected by water, but, due to their limited application, have not been found satisfactory.

An object of the present invention is to provide a stamp which causes a thin film bearing the imprint to soak loose from the main paper body of the stamp during the soaking operation, and because of the fragile character ofthe film, it cannot be reused. A further object is to provide a stamp which is composed of separable parts, the parts separating during the soaking operation and being of such character that they cannot be realigned for reuse. A further object is to provide a simple and effective method for producing a stamp with a non-reusable film that separates during the soaking operation. Other specific objects and advantages of the invention will appear as the specification proceeds.

The invention is described in a preferred embodiment, by the accompanying drawing, in

which- Fig. 1 is a perspective view of stamp-forming paper strips and illustrating the manner in which the thin lm is formed; and Fig. 2, an edge view of a .portion of the finished stamp formed as shown in Figure 1; Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are edge views of portions of stamps of modified constructions. 1

In the construction shown in Fig. 1, I combine with a central strip of paper, which is of a splitable character, two outer plies of paper, the outer plies serving as the paper base for the stamp. A water soluble adhesive is employed to connect the outer plies of paper with the central splitable strip. Preferably, the central strip of paper is of lighter weight and of a splitable type, so that, when divided, it forms a thin paper film. When all three sheets are combined, I preferably calendar the same in a moist state to remove the wrinkles and flatten out any irregularities. I then proceed to split'the center sheet while still moist, dividing it in half so as to leave half of it on each-outer ply. split sheet will be found to be rough after splitting, and in order to provide a printable surface,

The outer surface of the I calendar this outer surface. I have found that very good results are obtained by having the outer ply paper of a different color from the center sheet. For example, the colors may be complementary. However, if desired, opposite 5 or different colors may be used.

After the splitting operation and the calendaring of the inner rough surfaces of the split sheet, I have two strips, each having an unsplit paper base bonded with water soluble adhesive toV lo a thin paper film. The strips are then printed to form stamp imprints on the thin paper lm portion, and cut to form separate stamps.

It will be understood that the lower surface of the paper base of the stamp, at a suitable stage 15 during the operation, is provided with an adhesive by which the stamp may be applied to the bottle or other package.

If an attempt is made to remove the stamp by soaking, the water lquickly penetrates the thin 20 layer of pulp carrying the print, thus enabling it l to soak loose before the main paper body of the stamp is released. It'is substantially impossible to bring the layer of pulp back into alignment with the original stamp base, and even if this is '25 done, the imprint is so broken and injured thatl such reuse can be readily detected.

I have discovered that by using the abovedescribed method of splitting the central sheet, i I can successively combine, with the two base 30 'sheets employed in the splitting operation, a thin split sheet portion so delicate that it cannot be rehandled effectively after it floats free in a soaking operation. In other words', by employing theA splitting method, I can use a' central 35 sheet of paper which, though thin, can be readily and accurately handled, and then divided to onehalf its thickness.

While I prefer to employ the splitting method, it will be understood that a heavy sheet may be 40 combined with a light weight sheet and still utilize the present invention. I may vary the sizing in each of the sheets employed to a more or lessdegree. Also, the combination may be processed to re'duce curl after forming the 45 v of removing the label, the glue will discolor the label and thus indicate tampering. It will be further understood that other water soluble materials may be employed for the described purpose of discoloring the label after thesoaking operation.

If desired, the splitable center sheet may be provided with colored fibres of different colors to further identify the paper.

The resultant tax stamp is manufactured in a simple and very expeditious manner and provides a two-part' or laminated body which separates upon soaking. If desired, the stamp may afford one part so delicate and fragile that it cannot be handled after soaking, or at least cannot be reused without giving evidence of the removal. The process and product is immensely cheaper, in that it utilizes paper for forming the transfer.

In the modification shown in Fig. 3, I blow upon the adhesive or otherwise apply to it a layer of fibers which form the thin film for receiving the print. By this method, an extremely delicate film can be prepared which is nevertheless suiiciently tough to receive and support the print and to maintain it in good condition as long as the label or stamp is not immersed in water. When immersed or soaked in water, the adhesive dissolves and releases the fiber lm, together with the print which it carries.

In the modification shown in Fig. 4, I apply to the adhesive a thin layer of powdered clay. The clay may he of any desired composition. I have found that china clay, fuller's earth, and kaolin satisfactory. A large variety of clays may `obviously be used. The print is applied to the top of the powdered clay. I find that the powdered clay provides a smooth, even surface for receiving the print and that at the same time it separates easily from the body of the stamp or label when the stamp is immersed in water.

In the modification shown in Fig. 5, I have simply added starch to the clay so as to increase its unication. I find that a very satisfactory mixture is obtained when the clay is 80 per cent and the starch is 20 per cent of the whole. The starch may vary between 12 and 20 per cent and, if desired, even greater and less amounts may be used.

The stamp or label is, of course, useful not' only for tax purposes, but also for license and other purposes. If desired, the label may be used as a vehicle tag or tax license sticker and for very many other purposes without departing from the spirit of my invention, and in the accompanying claims where the term stamp is used, it will be understood that this term is used in its broader sense to include stickers, labels, etc. for any and all of the purposes to which it is applicable.-

It will be understood that the stamp or label or sticker may have adhesive for aiiixing it to thereon, and a thin paper print-receiving layer carried by said adhesive.

2. In a stamp structure of the character set forth, a paper base, water soluble adhesive thereon, and a thin paper print-receiving layer provided with an imprint carried by said adhesive.

3. In a stamp structure of the character set forth, a paper base, water soluble adhesive thereon, and a split paper print-receiving layer carried by said adhesive.

4. A stamp of the character set forth, comprising: a paper base, water soluble adhesive thereon, a split paper print-receiving layer carried by said adhesive, and an imprint on said print-receiving layer.

5. A stamp of the character set forth, comprising: a paper base, water soluble adhesive on each side of said base, a split paper print-receiving layer carried by the adhesive on one side of said base, and an imprint on said printreceiving layer.

6. A stamp of the character set forth, comprising: a paper base, water soluble adhesive on each side of said base, a split paper printreceiving layer carried by the adhesive on one side of said base, and an imprint on said printreceiving layer, said paper base and said paper transfer having complementary colors.

7. In a stamp structure of the character set forth, a paper base, water soluble adhesive thereon, a paper print-receiving layer carried by said adhesive, said paper base and said paper layer being of different colors, and an imprint on said transfer.

8. Non-reusable gummed paper of the character set forth, comprising a paper base, water w

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423818 *Oct 5, 1943Jul 8, 1947Reyburn Mfg Company IncTag
US2648487 *Jul 25, 1947Aug 11, 1953St Regis Paper CoBag for packaging tacky polymeric materials
US2648924 *Dec 16, 1949Aug 18, 1953Brewster Ernest BillingsLabel structure
US2784131 *Jun 25, 1951Mar 5, 1957Jr Horace FletcherStacking sheet
US2988834 *Aug 26, 1958Jun 20, 1961Meyercord CoApplication of transfers to articles
US3675844 *Mar 9, 1970Jul 11, 1972Sterling Coated Materials LtdEnvelope with sealing means
US5308120 *May 15, 1992May 3, 1994Kenneth ThompsonPeel off coupon redemption card and tracking system
US5537722 *Jun 5, 1995Jul 23, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyTape laminate structure
US5685570 *Apr 6, 1993Nov 11, 1997Sprintpak Pty LtdPostage stamps
US5702555 *Sep 19, 1996Dec 30, 1997Schweitzer-Mauduit International, Inc.Method of releasably securing the end of a roll of material
US6115891 *Aug 29, 1997Sep 12, 2000Ykk CorporationContinuous surface fastener tape and method of manufacturing the same
WO2012017404A2Aug 3, 2011Feb 9, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.System for securing flexible multi-panel sterilization assembly
WO2012104811A1Feb 3, 2012Aug 9, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible multi-panel sterilization assembly with bolsters
WO2013046186A1Sep 28, 2012Apr 4, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible multi-panel sterilization assembly with mass balancing side tabs
WO2013046187A2Sep 28, 2012Apr 4, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Flexible multi-panel sterilization assembly with side tabs
WO2013098679A2Dec 4, 2012Jul 4, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Process for making a flexible multi-panel sterilization assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/638, 283/71, 206/813, 24/DIG.110
International ClassificationG09F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09F2003/0285, G09F2003/0242, Y10S206/813, G09F3/02, Y10S24/11
European ClassificationG09F3/02