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Publication numberUS2206406 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1940
Filing dateFeb 1, 1938
Priority dateFeb 1, 1938
Publication numberUS 2206406 A, US 2206406A, US-A-2206406, US2206406 A, US2206406A
InventorsKoch Lydia B
Original AssigneeKoch Lydia B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper container
US 2206406 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. B. KOCH v PAPER CONTAINER July 2, 1940.

s Sheets- Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 1, 1938 INVENTOR BY LYD IAB; KOCH.

wan/1M6.

ATTORNEY y 2, 1940- L. a KOCH 2,206,406

PAPER CONTAINER Filed Feb. 1, 1938 JfSheeizs-Sheec 3 INVENTOR.

LYDiA Mom,

wa/vwn. Anoausv.

Patented July 2, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 6 Claims.

This invention relates to paper receptacles adapted to receive, temporarily retain and finally. freely deliver a liquid in a condition wholly unaffected by the container; specifically, a bottle for the retail sale of milk.

Science has shown that the usual transparent glass milk bottle is detrimental to. its contents, due to the passage of light through its walls, the actinic effect of the light causing a chemical in change to take place, in degree relative to the time length of its exposure, whereby the taste and odor is affected.

Glass bottles are objectionable also because of high cost, extreme fragility, difiiculty, expense l6 and waste of time in rendering them clean and sterile for reuse, cost of re-collection and excessive weight.

Havingthese matters in mind, it is an object of this invention to provide a paper container, in

s the form of a conventional milk bottle, having substantially opaque, light obstructive walls that are yieldable under pressure or shock without fracture.

A further feature is in the provision of a container, light in weight, convenient to handle, leak proof and normally sterile, no odor or taste being imparted to its contents, which are retained in pristine, palatable condition.

Another purpose is to produce a paper ;con-

tainer capable of economic manufacture from inexpensive material, intended to be discarded after being once used, and presenting a pleasing appearance in color and shape.

These characteristically advantageous objects are accomplished by the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter described and illustrated in, the accompanying drawings, constituting an essential component of this disclosure, and in hich:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view of a pre ferred embodiment of the invention.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the same.

Figure 3'is a transverse sectional view taken on line 3-4 of Figure 1.v

Figure 4 is a fragmentary view, partially in section, of the upper portion of the bottle, showing the mouth formation. I

Figure 5 is a similar view of the bottom por- L tlon.

' Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional view, taken at the joint between the upper and lower section of the body.

Figure 7 is a plan view of the blank from which the conical upper portion of the bottle is formed.

Figure 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional viewtaken on line 8-8 of Figure 7.

Figure 9 is a sectional view taken on line 99 of Figure '7. I

Figure 10 is a fragmentary view of a modified 5 blank for the conical upper wall.

Figure 11 is a plan view of the blank for the lower cylindrical wall section of the bottle. Figure 12 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on line I 2l 2 of Figure 11. 10

Figure 13 is a sectional view taken on line i8.-l3 of Figure 11.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary view of a modified blank for the lower, cylindrical wall of the bottle.

Figure 15 is a perspective view of a blank con- 15 stituting the bottom of the bottle.

Figure 16 is a similar view showing the blank as semi-finished. 1 v Figure 1'7 is a central sectional view of the bottom as finally formed. Figure 18 is a perspective view of a blank from which the bottle top is made. Figure 19 is a similar view of the same in a semi-finished condition.

Figure 20 is a central sectional-view of the 86 bottle top as completed. 1

Referring in greater detail to the drawings, the lower main body, designated generally by the numeral 25, is indicated as cylindrical, its well formed by coiling a blank strip of paper 26 so tightly upon itself as to produce, in eflfect, a unit composed of inner ,and outer laminae united under such pressure as to cause substantial coalescence, the end edge-21 of the outer coil and its upper edge 28 showing in Figure 1.

It is well known that in coiling a strip of paper upon itself, as the blanks 26 and 4|, outer end portion of the unconfined strip will stand away from the coil at a tangent, due to the inherent stifiness of the material.

\ produced, but insufficient to perforate the paper: 50'

then, upon the application of moisture, as from an adhesive, the extending end 21 tends to curl inwardly, towards the coil, rather than away from it, thus facilitating the formation of the cylinder or cone. These nodes or humps, in-

stead of being elongated, could be made by letters or numbers so that the name of the company and the patent numbers could be out into the paper.

The lower part of the cylinder thus produced is infolded, as at 3|, turned upwardly at 32 and finally directed outwardly towards the wall, as at 33, thereby forming an annular recess 34 of essentially rectangular cross section.

The curling of the bottom is facilitated by the formation, in the lower edge of blank 26, of a plurality of closely arranged depressions 35, causing a substantial softening and stretching of the fibers so that the edge portion is rendered more readily yieldable and ductile.

A circular disc 31 shown in detail in Figures 15, 16, and 17 constitutes the slightly concave bottom, the peripheral edge of the disc being corrugated or undulated, as at 38, and curled downwardly. upon itself, as at 39, to conform to the annular recess 34 in which it is interengaged and solidly embedded by dies operating from both sides under heavy pressure, as may be noticed by the substantially square outer corner and fiat under surface of the edge of the bottle bottom. all crevices being eventually filled with parafiln or similar odorless, tasteless, bland substance whereby a leak proof joint is produced.

The upper element of the bottle is formed in a similar manner, from a crescent shaped blank 4| to constitute a cone, its lower cylindrical portion 42 having its coiled layers spread to receive the outer coil of the upper edge of the body 28 therebetween, while the corresponding inner coil of the bodyelement is disposed interjacent the inner coil of the cone.

The interengaging base42 .of the cone blank is preferably rather deeply undulated by angular impressions 35' radiating from the axis of the curved blank, as best seen in Figure 7.

These several layers are condensed and consolidated at their junction by rolling on a mandrel to produce a substantially smooth inner surface and a slightly corrugated outer surface presenting an annular row of indentations causing the fibers of the paper to coalesce and firmly unite the upper and lower portions 'of the bottle, which is further secured by an adhesive.

The upper portion of' the cone 40 is further treated to produce a series of creased undulations 45 constantly increasing in magnitude towards the mouth rim 46 of the bottle, these undulations starting from near the .base of the cone and acting to increase its conicity, strength and rigidity, and also to provide an effective grip for the hand.

The rim 46 is expanded to a diameter in'excess of the upper end of the cone and presents an arcuately curved outer surface, merging .at its upper edge 41 into a downreaching cylinder 48, ending in a firm, fiat flanged seat 49 to receive a conventional bottle cap thereon retained by the cylinder.

The inner edge of the seat is downwardly curved to blend into an inner arcuate element 50 disposed closely interjacent the rim 46 and finally turned downwardly, as at 5| adjacent the wall of the cylinder-48, all minute spaces being filled with paraffin after beingformed by pressure into the shape indicated.-

It is to be understood that the joints of the structure are secured by a suitable cementitious adhesive, as is also the folds of the mouth, stiffening the several united elements, so that the initial shape is maintained, .and, further, that the entire interior is treated in such manner as to introduce an impervious lining of some innocuous bland substance, such as paraffin.

It will be noted that the paper blanks 4|, shown in Figures '7 and 10, haveltheir upper corners removed to present flat edges 4|, thus avoiding excessive thickening at points where these corners would overlap.

Also in Figure 10, the opposite outer corner 4|" is cut out for the same reason, a similar reduced corner 26' showing in Figure 14, the elimination of these corners tending to produce uniformity in the thickness of the completed wall, avoiding difficulty in manufacture and improving the appearance of the product.

Figures 18 to 20 illustrate the bottle cap, composed of a disc 55 crenulated as at 56 at its edges, these undulations extending well into the body.

Eventually the cap is shaped between dies to present a flat central portion 51 suited to enter the bottle mouth 48, and rest on the seat 49, its edge forming a semi-circle 58 in cross section, adapted to engage over the rim 41 and extend downwardly, as a skirt 59, resiliently fitting the enlargement 46, due to the flexibility of the skirt wall, which is normally inwardly inclined.

The foregoing disclosure is to be regarded as descriptive and illustrative only, and not as restrictive orlimitative of the invention, of which obviously an embodiment may be constructed including many modifications without departing from the general scope herein indicated and denoted in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. A sectional container composed of volutely laminated tightly rolled two-ply blanks, the contiguous edges of adjoining sections mechanically interleaved to form an interengaged joint said blanks notched at their intersecting corners to avoid an excessively thickened hump in the finished seam.

2. A sectional container composed of volutely laminated, tightly rolled' two-ply blanks, each recessed at their, intersecting corners, the contiguous edges of adjoining sections of which are mechanically and sucessively interleaved in the presence of an adhesive and finally rolled under pressure whereby a smooth inner surface and closely corrugated outer surface is obtained at the joint thus'formed, the fibers of the paper becoming coalesced.

3. A paper blank for a container element, said blank being arcuately curved at its upper and lower edges and of equal width throughout its length, the ends of said blank presenting uniform angles directed radially to the axis of the curved edges, one of the lower corners being sharply defined, the other notched and the uppercorners uniformly horizontal to a radial line bisecti ng the curved edges.

g 4. A paper container comprising a cylindrical smooth interior surface, a raised concave closure permanently fixed in the bottom portion of said lower member, a mouth at the uppermost end of said conical element, and an annular cap receiving seat disposed within said mouth.

5. In a paper bottle, a conical neck comprised of a blank cut in the form of a segment; its inner and outer edges circumscribed by radii having the same focal point and embracing an angle of ninety degrees, the inner upper, corners reduced to present straight edges disposed horizontally with respect to a plane passing through the center of saidsegment and focal point, and a notch cut in the lower corner of the segment at one end thereof said notch preventing additional thickness of the bottle wall at point of comple-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426797 *Sep 3, 1943Sep 2, 1947Joseph P SteinLiquidproof container
US2501852 *May 8, 1944Mar 28, 1950Gardner Board & Carton CoMeans for effecting hermetic closures in cartons and containers
US5616378 *May 30, 1995Apr 1, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5616382 *May 30, 1995Apr 1, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5618596 *May 30, 1995Apr 8, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5620761 *May 30, 1995Apr 15, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5622754 *May 30, 1995Apr 22, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5633056 *May 30, 1995May 27, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5674577 *May 30, 1995Oct 7, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5677021 *May 30, 1995Oct 14, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5681625 *May 30, 1995Oct 28, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5683765 *May 30, 1995Nov 4, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5753327 *May 30, 1995May 19, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US5976647 *Aug 7, 1997Nov 2, 1999Southpac Trust International, Inc.Article forming system
US6039682 *Nov 20, 1997Mar 21, 2000Fort James CorporationContainers formed of a composite paperboard web and methods of forming
US6186394Mar 6, 2000Feb 13, 2001Fort James CorporationContainers formed of a composite paperboard web and methods of forming the same
US6287247Mar 6, 2000Sep 11, 2001Fort James CorporationContainers formed of a composite paperboard web and methods of forming the same
US6311431Jun 21, 2000Nov 6, 2001Southpac Trust International, Inc.Pot cover with preset folds
US6427381Aug 24, 2001Aug 6, 2002Southpac Trust Int'l. Inc.Pot cover with preset folds
US6484442Aug 4, 2000Nov 26, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Sheets of material having forming indicia for forming into flower pots or plant covers and methods
US6615541Aug 6, 2002Sep 9, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Sheets of material having forming indicia for forming into flower pots or plant covers and methods
US7311243 *Jul 27, 2006Dec 25, 2007Paper Machinery CorporationTwo piece paper cup and sidewall blank therefor
US8484891Nov 30, 2012Jul 16, 2013Wanda M. Weder & William F. StraeterDecorative flower pot cover formed of polymeric materials having a matte or textured finish simulating the texture and/or appearance of paper
US20030198772 *Mar 4, 2003Oct 23, 2003Weder Donald E.Polymeric materials having a texture or appearance simulating the texture or appearance of paper
US20040013840 *Jul 15, 2003Jan 22, 2004Weder Donald E.Decorative cover for flower pot or floral grouping formed of polymeric materials having a texture or appearance simulating the texture or appearance of paper
US20040020119 *Jun 30, 2003Feb 5, 2004Weder Donald E.Sheets of material having forming indicia for forming into flower pots or plant covers and methods
US20050255274 *Jul 22, 2005Nov 17, 2005Weder Donald EPolymeric materials having a texture or appearance simulating the texture or appearance of paper
US20060053745 *Sep 30, 2005Mar 16, 2006Weder Donald EDecorative cover for flower pot or floral grouping formed of polymeric materials having a texture or appearance simulating the texture or appearance of paper
US20080053600 *Oct 31, 2007Mar 6, 2008Weder Donald EPolymeric Materials Having a Texture or Appearance Simulating the Texture or Appearance of Paper
US20080053601 *Oct 31, 2007Mar 6, 2008Weder Donald EDecorative Cover for Flower Pot or Floral Grouping Formed of Polymeric Materials Having a Texture or Appearance Simulating the Texture or Appearance of Paper
USD398224Dec 16, 1996Sep 15, 1998Southpac Trust International, Inc.Floral wrapper
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/4.5, 229/5.5
International ClassificationB65D3/02, B65D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D3/02
European ClassificationB65D3/02