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Publication numberUS2206761 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1940
Filing dateOct 17, 1938
Priority dateOct 17, 1938
Publication numberUS 2206761 A, US 2206761A, US-A-2206761, US2206761 A, US2206761A
InventorsMorris Bergstein Robert
Original AssigneeMorris Bergstein Robert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine and method for package closure
US 2206761 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 2, 94U., R M BERGSTIN 2,206,761

MACHINE AND METHOD FOR PACKAGE CLOSUFE Filed Oct. 17, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet l N Kaw A W A I* w mumLwl l N ln 57 56 54 ,zszzaa 64 68 55 lge 6.9 6435 A TTORNEYAS.

July Z, 1940. R. M. BERGsTl-:IN

MACHINE AND METHOD FOR PACKAGE CLOSURE Filed oct. 17, 195s 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 N. w m. m w e m N F. T. 15 A w q f. Mw W N D OQNI a. m w .M MN w mw mi wm., @WJ www \U QW v4 E.. IMJ, m un w D 1 .G (Il I O O i my o nmvsm. uw .0% mw. `Q l3nt/m.. `m QN Ila! c I 0 Il' u m mm. oo TNNN w Wm o 0mm o .wm u. oo .WQ d u l v QN mv o v NR N w xm@ m. l A fly www n .ww m 7 x\ \NL Amm mtv u July 2, 1940.

` R. M. BERGSTEIN MACHINE AND METHOD FOR PACKAGE CLOSURE Filed Oct. 17, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 MQW ATTORNEYIS Bab'. BY

`Iuly 2, 1940. Rl Ml BERGSTElN 2,206,761

MACHINE AND METHOD FOR PACKAGE CLOSURE Filedoct. 17, 193s 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 IN VENTOR. s

@MQW

ATTORNEYS.

July 2, 1940. R. M.' BERGsTElN `MACHINE AND METHOD FOR PACKAGE CLOSURE Fileaoot. 17, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 1N VENTOR. /faaf'fr Mfg/@ls .Bies-sra.

M QL M ATTORNEYS.

July 2, 1940- R. M. BERGsTr-:IN 2,206,761

MACHINE AND METHOD FOR 'PACKAGE CLOSUR Filed oct. 17. 1938 6 Sheetssheet 6 INVENTOR Raaf/3 r foff/s fasrE/N.

BY MQW ATTORNEYS.

Patented July 2, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CLOS URE

Robert Morris Bergstein, Cincinnati, Ohio Application, October 17,

:n is claims.

p Inmy. United States Patentdvo. 2,095,910,is, sued october 12,v 1937, anche.' 2,114,621, issued April 19', 1938, I have disclosed machines and methods for making knock-down containers comprising an outer carton with inner liner secured, therein, which liner may be open at both ends, or closed at one end, as desired. Itis desirable in many instances to have the outer carton made of board `that has been treated to b e waterproof, as for example by paraffin or the like, and in such cases it is diicult, if not impossible, to satisfactorily seal with adhesive the carton ilaps to eiect the final carton closure, due to the impermeable nature of the surface. Accordingly in -many cases the carton flaps have been secured in closing position by locking rather than sealing, the locking usually taking the form of a slot in one flap and a corresponding tongue in the other opposite flap, which are engaged in interlocking position. This locking has customarily been done by hand, and I have discovered means and method for carrying out this locking operation efliciently by machine, and this is one of the objects of my invention.

In my United States Patents Nos. 2,114,622, 2,114,623 and 2,114,624, I disclosed means and method for sealing the mouths of liners within cartons. By my invention as herein disclosed, I now accomplish the sealing of the liner, and the interlocking of the carton flaps, as part of a series of continuous operations, providing for the complete closure of the package, efficiently and without hand manipulation.

By my invention, a single machine may also be provided which provides a closure for both ends of the package, that is which receives a container comprising an outer carton having locking flaps, and an inner liner secured therein, with both ends of said liner open, which accomplishes the operation of sealing an end of the liner, in- 40 terlocking the aps thereabout (when the container may then be inverted and filled with the contents), thereafter the same machine will con- Vey the filled container closing Ithe remaining open end of the liner, and iinally locking the 45 flaps about the nal closed liner end. Among other features in connection with this machine I disclose means whereby a series of cages may be used to retain the containers during their course of travel, said cages having cut-away portions, and a stationary guide-bar, whereby the samev cages may be used to convey both the empty or filled container, compensating for the difference in height, which is a still further object of my invention.

1938, Serial No. 235,315

, These and' other "objects 'of my, invention will become' apparent as the description proceeds.

Reference is now made to the drawings where- Figure 1 is a side elevation of my machine, hav- 5 .ing parts broken away and certain parts in section, with various supporting elementsjfor the several guide bars omitted, so as to'permit a clear `illustration of the points involved in my invention.' 10

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the mechanism seen in Fig. 1, having a portion thereof broken away.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3 3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is a perspective showing one of th cages and associated members I employ to carry the cartons through my machine.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary side elevation illustrating a latch for retaining the front end flap of 2G the carton in a downward position during certain operations and 'means for releasing the latch when desired.

Fig. 6 is a perspective of the latch member.

Fig. 7 is a section taken along line 1-1 of 25 Fig. 2, showing means for spreading` the carton mouth and showing the heat sealing members in open position. A

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary front elevation of the spreading means seen in Fig. 7, showing in broken 30 lines the extended position of the fingers within the carton mouth.

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken along the line 9 9 of Fig. 2, illustrating means for actuating the sealing members.

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 but showing the sealing members in closed position.

Fig. 11 is a perspective showing certain guide bars whichserve to turn down the sealed mouth of the carton liner. 40

Fig, 12 is a perspective showing a preferred arrangement of members for closing and interlocking the tongued and slotted side flaps of the carton. v

Fig. 13 is a section taken along the line |3-l3 45 of Fig. 2' showing an ejector and means for operating same in timed relation to the conveyor movement.

Fig. 14 is a diagrammatic plan view illustrating a scheme for remote filling of the cartons.

Fig. 15 is a perspective showing a modied carton closure and an alternative means for interlocking same.

Fig. 16 is a perspective of a carton in knockdown condition, and

Fig. 17 is a perspective of the carton squared. up in preparation for loading the machine.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, a suitable frame I supports a table-like surface 2, having formed therein a conveyor track 3. The conveyor chain 4 is driven by a right hand sprocket 5 fixed to a shaft 6, and runs over a sprocket 1 which is fixed to a shaft 8. Thus any movement of the shaft 6 results in similar movement of shaft 8.

Referring to Fig. 3 the conveyor chain is driven intermittently byaction of a fou-r-stop Geneva mechanism, the driven wheel 9 of which is fixed to the shaft 6. The driving pin I0 and locking member II of the Geneva mechanism are here xed to a large gear I2, said gear being in turn driven by a motor I3 through a belt I4, a pulley I5, a shaft I6 and a worm I1. 'Ihe intermittent mechanism is enclosed in a suitable casing'I8 having journaled bearings as required. Fixed to the large gear I2 is a vertical shaft I9 which extends upward through the table-like surface 2,

and is provided at its upper end with a miter m gear 20, meshing with a like gear 2|, xed on the longitudinal shaft 22. The shaft 22 is journaled in bearing brackets 23 and 24 and has aiixed various cams and gears, the purpose of which will be later explained. From the foregoing it will be apparent that the shaft 22 is driven in timed relation with the conveyor movement and that for each movement of the conveyor the shaft 22 will make one complete revolution.

The conveyor chain is provided with a series of equally spaced plates 25, which, referring to Fig. 4, are vprovided with a pair of upstanding members 26, 26. The members 26 are held to the conveyor plates by screws 26a passing through slots 2Gb which permit re-setting of the members 26 to accommodate various widths of cartons. Ihe members 26 have cut-out portions 26e, the purpose of which will be later explained.

Referring to Fig. 16, I have shown in knockdown condition one type of carton for which my machine is particularly adapted. The carton body 21 here shown may be formed of any desired paper board or cardboard material.

is the ability of my mechanism to form an effective closure in a carton, the outer body material of which has been impregnated with paran or the like, rendering satisfactory sealing of the end flaps dicult by use of adhesive or the like, as in present practice. The carton here shown has an inner heat sealable liner 28 secured to the inner/side Walls, this liner, for p-urpose of sealing, being of sufficient length to extend beyond the carton walls. Articulated by score lines or fold lines 29 at each end of the body are a set of closure flaps generally indi-- ,cated at 30 and 30a. As better seen in Fig. 12 lthe side ap 3I is formed with a tongue 3Ia which is adapted to engage within a slot or cut 32 of side flap 33. 'I'he slot or cut 32 has adjoining angular cuts 32a which are in turn adjoined by a score or fold line 32h; thus a weakened portion which is readily bendable is formed. Due to the direction of travel as indicated by the arrows in Fig. 12, I shall refer to the flap 34 as the leading or front end flap and the flap 35 shall be referred to as the trailing or rear end iiap, the designation ofthese flaps being an arbitrary matter depending on the direction of travel.

As previously described the conveyor is driven intermittently or in steps, the distance of travel during movement being equal to the center' to center distance of consecutive conveyor plates. Thus a series of stops-or stations are established which are advantageous in performing certain operations. As shown in the drawings the conveyor is in the position it assumes during a period of rest.

Before filling the cartons must be set up with the ultimate bottom seal of the liner completed. The extending portion of the sealed liner must be folded within the box and the adjacent side flaps turned in and interlocked. `The mechanisms for accomplishing these results are incorporated in my machine, the required operations occurring While the carton travels between the stations indivated in the drawings at A and E.

After the carton has thus been erected or set up, it isready to receive the contents, which contents may be inserted therein by any means or apparatus best suited to handle that particular type of contents or material in consideration. In 1- the machine illustrated I have shown at 36 a conventional filling head, and as seen in Fig. 2, the

"'*lling of the carton may occur at station F, or

One of the W principal advantages of my invention, however,

if a slower rate of lling is required, part of the `contents may be inserted at station F and the balance at station G; or the filling may be a continuous operation commencing at station F and continuing while the carton travels to and rests at station G.

After lling it will be required to seal the open mouth of the liner, fold same within the box and close and interlock the end flaps. These operations are identical with those required for setting up the carton as previously described, and take place while the carton travels between stations G and K. The sealing and closing mechanisms here employed are an exact duplication of the mechanisms interposed between stations A and E.

In the operation of the machine the operator i picks up the fiat carton as seen in Fig. 16, squares it manually to the open position seen in Fig. 17, and places it between the upstanding members 26 as seen at A in Fig. 1. Referring to Fig. 5, the leading or front end ap 34 is bent downward along its line of articulation against the angular member 38 until it engages and isV held under the latch 31. 'Ihe trailing or rear end flap 35 is bent downwardly along its line of articulation against the angular member 39. This bending of the flaps 34 and 35 against the members 38 and 39 provides proper vertical placement of the carton for cooperation with the sealing and closing mechanisms. As shown the ap 35 after being bent downward will tend to return to its original position, likewise the flap 34 will spring upward tending to return to ts'original position when the latch 31 is released. 'I'he latch 31 is released when the sidewise extending portion 31a is depressed by striking the stationary cam bar 31h. To provide for various size cartons the members 38 and 39 have adjustment carton is to be temporarily ejected from the machine. It will be observed that the members 26 mounted on each conveyor plate, cooperating with the guide rails 42 and 43, effect a. series of traveling cages, to guide the cartons in required alignment through the machine. It is also to be noted that the arrangement shown is capable of ready adjustment to convey other size cartons.

As the carton travels onward the flaps 3|, 35 and 33 are engaged and turned downward by curved bars 44 and 45, which bars have straight extended portions 46 serving to retain the said flaps in the downward position as required during sealing of the inner liner.

The movement of the conveyor pauses when the carton reaches the position or station indicated at B, and it is here that sealing of the inner liner takes place. The sealing mechanism here employed is similar to that described and claimed in my patents tpreviously referred to. Referring' to Figs. 7 and 8, a pair of ngers 41 and 48 are slidably mounted on studs 41a and 48a. The fingers have curved slots 41h and 48h and are perforated at their upper end to'receive an operating bar 49. The bar 49 is pivoted at 49a in an upstanding bracket and has an extended portion 49h with cam roller 49e engaged by the cam 49d on shaft 22. The member 49 is urged to the position shown by the spring 49e. When the member 49 descends due to action of the cam 49d, the fingers 41 and 48 riding over the studs will descend and be expanded within the open mouth of the carton liner as seen in broken lines. The liner is thus spread and partially flattened as seen in Fig. 9, where the spreader fingers have been omitted from the y drawing and the heat sealing elements are shown in open position. 'I'he sealing elements 5|) and are of the electrical heated4 type being mounted on arms 52 and 53 affixed to the shafts 54 and 55,

which shafts are in turn journaled in brackets 56 and have xed at their oute'r ends gears 51 and 58. The gear 58 has a stud 58a connected with a cam follower 59 by a link 59a. The assembly is urged to the position shown by the tension spring 60. As can be readily determined by inspection of the drawings, the action of the cam 6| (fixed on the shaft 22) will cause the heating elements to be carried to the closed position seen in Fig. 10. The element 5|) is provided with a tongue or bead 50a, and the opposite element 5| is provided with a groove 5|a. As the tongue and groove elements contact the liner, so that the tongue enters at least partially into the groove causing the liner material to become curved, heat being present causes the opposite inner faces of the liner mouth to become fused. Attached beneath the heating elements are a pair of sweepers 50h and 5|b. The object of these sweepers is to evacuate the air out of the open mouth of the bag and partially from the interior or below the upper edge of the carton. These sweepers are so mounted that they precede the contact of the heating elements so that the air is expelled before the heat seal is made. Referring to Fig. 11, the appearance of the flattened and sealed liner mouth (after the spreader fingers and sealing elements have receded) is shown atX.

After the sealing operation as just described, the conveyor again starts to move and the upstanding sealed liner X is engaged between a pair of curved guides 62 and 63 (best seen in Fig. 1l) which as the carton moves along serve to turn down the sealed end of the liner. The extended portion 63a of guide 63 retains the liner in downward position while the front end flap 34 is bent inward and down by action of a bar E4 (see Figs. 1 and 12), the ilap 34 having just previously been released from the latch 31 by action of the cam bar 31h. In turning cr folding over the flap 3( the overlying portion of the liner will be carried therewith and folded inwardly beneath the ap. The hold-down bars 46 terminate just previous to this `point and release the fiaps 3|, 33 and 35 allowing them to spring upward. The conveyor then comes to rest at station C.

Just as the carton is about to leave station C the trailing or rear end flap 35 and the overlying portion of the liner mouth are turned inward and down by the rotating element 65 (Figs. 1 and 2), further movement of the carton causes the ap to be engaged under the bar 64 which retains it in downward position while the remaining flaps 3| and 33 are folded and interlocked as will presently be explained. The rotating element 65 is mounted on shaft 66 journaled in bearing bracket 61, and is driven in timed relation with the conveyor by a pair of spiral gears 68, the driver of which is fixed on shaft 22.

Referring to Fig. 12 the carton at C is shown just as the folding and interlocking of flaps 3|' and 33 is about to commence. As the carton moves forward a curved bar 69 engages the ultimate upper side" of the slotted ap 33. The hold down bar 64 is bent sidewise as at 64a so as to bring its outer edge into alignment with the line of articulation of flap 33 and has an extending enlarged cross sectional portion 64b. The curvature of bar B9 is such that the flap 33 will be turned inward and down against the carton body with the enlarged portion 64b of bar 64 underlying the fiap. This action tends to open the slot 32 and the position of the flap at this point is seen at D. It is to be noted that the extended underside 69a of the bar 69 retains" or holds down the flap 33 in its folded' position and that an enlarged portion or hump 69h of the bar 69 coextensive with the underside 69a underlies the tongued flap 31, which flap is turned over by a curved bar 10. Referring to the carton at C the curved bar 'l0 engages the ultimate upper side of ap 3| and in turning the flap about the enlarged portion 69h the effective length of the tongue is reduced, thatis, the distance of a straight line or chord between the line of articulation 3|b and the edge of the tongue 3|c is shortened, due to the fact that the flap 3| is in curved formation. The enlarged portion 69h gradually tapers off to the point of termination l 69e, so that as the carton progresses the effective length of the tongue is increased. As seen on the carton at D the edge of the tongue 3|c is in a position favorable for entry into the slot 32. The extended portion a of the bar 1|) is arranged to press downward on the flap so that as the carton moves forward and the effective length of the tongue 3|a is increased it will enter the slot 32' due to pressure of the overhead guide 10a. As the carton passes the terminal points 64C and 690 of the enlarged members the portion 10b ofthe bar 19 will urge the tongued flap into completely interlocked position. The flaps are then in their normal plane and the ultimate bottom of the container completely formed. After passing the terminus 19h of the overhead guide the carton will have arrived at station E. From the foregoing it will be observed that the bar 10 serves as an overhead guide for the tongued side flap; the bar 69 serves the dual purpose of an overhead guide for the slotted flap and an underneath guide for the tongued flap; and the bar 64 functions as an underneath guide for the slotted flap while retaining the end flaps 34 and 35 in their folded position.

At station E the carton is immediately ejected from the machine by an ejector arm 1|, which arm after ejecting the carton immediately recedes to permit re-insertion of the carton in its upright position for filling. The ejector arm 1| is fixed on the shaft 1 |a journaled in bearing brackets 12 and 12a. Fixed to shaft 1|a the lever arm 1|bhas pivoted thereto a link`13, which link is actuated by a cam 14 on the shaft 22. After operation of the device, as indicated by the broken lines in Fig. 13, the mechanism is returned to its inoperative position by tension of the spring 15.

In replacing the carton, in its upright position, at station E, the operator will follow the same procedure as outlined in the description previously given in reference to station A, that 1s, the leading end flap 34 will be engaged under the latch 31 and the carton will be located vertically by bending of the fiaps 34 and 35 against the gauge members 38 and 39. The carton also abuts an inner guide rail 42a. It is to be noted that the iiaps articulated to this upper end of the carton and the arrangement of the extending inner liner therewith, is merely a duplication of those members as already described in regard to forming the bottom of the container, and have been given like refe-rence numerals in the drawings.

As the conveyor carries the carton away from station E, a side guide bar 43a serves to hold the carton in proper alignment, and curved bars 80 and 8| turn down and outward the flaps 3|, 33 and 35. The bar 43 extends about the machine to a point where the cartons will be finally ejected at station K. Also as the carton leaves station E it rides onto an underneath bar 19 which will support the carton and the weight of the contents therein for proper cooperation with the final sealing and closing mechanism encountered after filling. The bar 19 is provided with vertical adjustment to accommodate other size cartons and extends about the machine to the station K Where as before mentioned, the cartons are finally ejected from the machine. YThe bar 19 is permitted to enter beneath the cartons by the cut away portions 26e of the upright members 26 best seen in Fig. 4.

Fixed to rotate with shaft 8 the filling head 36 has a plurality of rotating spouts 36a timed to travel with the cartons in their movement between stations E and G. The filling head has a stationary member 36D in which the required valves or ports for controlling flow of material through the spouts and into the containers may be incorporated. The member 36h is restrained from rotation by the stud 36d which abuts the fixed upright bar 36e and a supply line is indicated at 36e. It will be understood that the filling mechanism here shown is of exemplary construction and I am not to be limited to the particular arrangement or type of filling mechanism here shown.

As previously described and explained, a carton passing beneath the fillinghead and arriving at station G will have the contents therein and will be ready for the final sealing and closing operations. Further movement of the conveyor carries the carton to station H where the open mouth of the inner liner is spread and sealed by mechanism similar to that described at station B. The spreader fingers at station H are actuated by a cam 8| fixed on the shaft 22, and the sealing members are actuated by a cam 83 also fixed on the shaft 22. At station I the leading or front end nap 34 is turned down against the carton body by the bar 64m, and the trailing end ap 35 is turned down by the rotating element 65.1: driven from the shaft 22 through a spiral gearing 84. Interposed between' stations I and K are folding and interlocking bars 64x. 69x and 10x, which lfunction to close and interlock the remaining side flaps. At station K the ejector arm 1|x expels the completely filled and sealed container from the machine. The-ejector 1li: is actuated by a cam 85 on the shaft 22.

No particular function or operation will occur at the stations marked D and J, as the interlocking of the side flaps will preferably require a greater distance of travel than is afforded between consecutive stations in the arrangement shown.

In conjunction with the interlocking of the side fiaps and to complete the folding thereof I may employ an extra pair of guides or pressure members (10c), longitudinally disposed, to act upon the two opposite edges of the carton by pressing along the longitudinal edges of the folds, thus assuring more dependable `interlocking, as well as providing a 'more dependable attened condition for the cartons to stand in upright position for filling or other purposes.

In Fig. 4 I have shown a simple but effective means to provide adjustable supports for the various guide rails. Here the bracket 95 is fixed to the machine frame and has a vertical extending rod 96 on which a block 91 is held by set screw 98. The block is bored as at 99 to receive a rod |00, said rod being clamped Within the block by set screw |0I. The inner end of the rod |00 is fixed to the guide member in any convenient manner as at |02. With this arrangement any desired position of the guide members may be obtained.

In some cases it will be desired to eliminate the filling head 36 and receive the cartons ejected at station E upon a conveyor as shown at 16 in Fig. 14. Here the cartons ejected onto conveyor 16 are transferred to a secondary conveyor 16a upon which conveyor they may be filled by thel machine 11. For hand packing of the cartons the machine 11 will be replaced by a packing table. After filling, the cartons are transferred to another conveyor 1Gb, which carries them to a convenient position near the station G where the lled carton is again loaded onto the machine for sealing of the open liner mouth and interlocking of the end iiaps by mechanism interposed between stations G and K. At K the filled and sealed carton is again ejected from the machine and may be received upon a conveyor 18 for final disposition as required.

In Fig. 15 I have illustrated an alternate interlocking device. As shown this consists of a timed overhead cam 93, which is synchronized with the course of travel of the container, and as the container passes beneath this cam with the iiaps and 9| previously folded to the normal interlocking plane, the cam becomes operative and the nose bears down upon the folded aps over the slotted and tongued portion, serving to depress this portion. The effect of this depression is to lower the tongued and slotted flaps beneath the normal interlocking plane, thereby bringing the edge of the tongue 9|b into position adjoining the slot 90a, so` that when in the further course of motion of the container the cam continues to revolve and thereby the pressure on4 the aps is released, and the iiaps will resume their normal plane, in interlocked position. With this arrangement the iiaps may be interlocked While the carton is stationary, if desired.

It can be seen that this alternate interlocking fered device since in order to foreshorten the device as described is less desirable than my'pretongued flap or the slotted ap, or both, it bends said nap or fiaps from their normalinterlocking plane, this foreshortening serving the purpose of bringing the edge of the tongue into operative position adjacent the slot so that when the flaps are released back into their normal position or plane, they are in interlocked engagement. In the case of my preferred method as described, the foreshortening is accomplished as explained by curving or arching the iiap or flaps, which serves to shorten the transverse distance between the fold line of the flap and the edge of the tongue or slot, while in my alternate method as described above the flaps are depressed belovi7 their normal plane, also eifecting a shortening of the transverse distance between the fold line of the flaps and the edge of the tongue or slot. 'I'his latter method will be interfered with by the contents of a package after filling and will push down on the liner when empty.

' It is obvious that the location and nature of the slot, also of the tongue may be varied if desired without departing from the spirit of this invention, and if desired, due to the size or shape of the flaps, a plurality of tongues and slots may be utilized, and are adaptable to my same interlocking process.

It is obvious that variations may be made in the shape and location of the guides if desired. For example, if a complete cut-away slot is utilized, it may not be necessary to have an underneath slotted side flap guide, since the operation may be performed successfully through the use of the overhead slotted side flap guide, and the underneath tongued side iiap guide and overhead tongued side flap guide. While I prefer to have these guides stationary and move the carton through them, it would also be possible to have thev carton at rest or moving in an opposite direction, and use movable guides, and all such variations are contemplated within the scope of my invention, so long as the basic interlocking principles as described herein, are utilized.

Due to` the arrangement illustrated and described using cageswith cut-away areas and interposing a stationary guide in the said areas, it can be seen that I have provided extremely simple and effective means of providing a continuous conveyance for packaging of varying overall heights. That is, if a carton with an inner liner having both ends open is used, so that a seal at both ends is necessary, whereby the carton when initially introduced into the, machine has the aps at both ends extending, it is obvious that this height is greater by the length of the flaps, than the same carton after one end has been closed, and the flaps folded to their normal interlocking plane. Without this feature, it would be necessary `to either have cages of varying height which would reduce the machine's production, or else to make variations in the height of the locking and sealing members, which would introduce extra mechanical difficulties. I may also adapt this same principle to side adjustments instead of a vertical adjustment, if desired, by using cutouts in the sides of the cages, and a stationary guide bar, whereby the carton can be inserted just up to the side guide bar, thereby permitting ready variation in the width of the carton, without the need of complicated adjustments, or changing the cages themselves.

It will be apparent that my process is adaptable to automatic interlocking of ordinary unlined cartons if desired. My automatic interlocking principle is also adapted, as described, to

form parts of a continuous operation wherein lined cartons are used, the device effecting the heat-sealing and folding of one end of aliner within the carton, thereafter interlocking the flaps at said end of the carton, and, as illustrated, by further employment of the same principle the device can continue after the container has been filled, to seal the remaining end of the liner, folding it into \position thereafter, and thereafter making the final interlocking closure of remaining end, completing the package. It is obvoius, however, that my invention could be separated into two units, if desired, one for accomplishing the sealing and folding of a liner and interlocking the aps at one end of the carton, and the other unit to produce the same result on the remaining end of the container, after having been filled. The particular arrangement of the device or the devices in this regard is optional, and all such variations are contemplated within the scope of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is: e

1. A device for interlocking a pair ofv opposite carton flaps, one of which includes a projecting tongue and the other of which includes a slotted or weakened portion, which comprises folding means to fold said flaps toward their normal interlocking plane by overhead guides, and underneath guides located to engage under said flaps so as to bow the same and bring theedge of said tongue adjacent to said slotted portion, and pressing means to press on said tongued flap, thereby releasing said tongue into engaged position with said slotted or weakened portion all of aforesaid guides and means being stationary re1- ative to each other, and means for causing relative movement between the carton and the underneath guides as the pressing means are ap- 4 plied.

2. In a machine for interlocking a pair of opposite aps articulated to a carton body, one of which flaps has a tongue and the other of which has a corresponding slot, means for folding and deecting said flaps to bring the edge of said tongue adjacent to said slot, and means for releasing said flaps to their normal interlocking plane in interlocked position, said means being stationary relative to each other.

3. In a machine for closing the flaps articulated to an end of a carton body, one opposite pair of which flaps include a tongued ap and the other a corresponding slot, means for conveying said carton in direction of motion parallel to the fold lines of said last mentlonedpair of flaps. means for folding in thev other` pair of opposite flaps, means for retaining said iiaps in folded position, and means during further travel of carton to bring said tongued flap and slotted flap between curved overhead, and underneath guides which deflect said flaps thereby shortening transverse distance between edge of tongue and line of articulation to bring the edge of said tongue adjacent to the slot, said underneath guides being tapered, whereby upon still further travel of the carton, said flaps will assume normal interlocking plane, in interlocked position, after having passed beyond said guides.

4. In a machine for closing the flaps articulated to an end of a carton body, one opposite pair of which flaps include a tongued flap and the other a corresponding slot, means for conveying said carton in direction of motion parallel to the fold lines of said last mentioned pair of flaps, means for folding in the other pair of opposite flaps, means for retaining said flaps in folded position, and means during further travel of carton to bring said tongued ilap and slotted flap between curved overhead, and underneath guides which deect said flaps thereby shortening transverse distance between edge of tongue and line of articulation to bring the edge of said tongue adjacent to the slot, said underneath guides being tapered, whereby upon still further travel of the carton, said flaps will assume normal interlocking plane, in interlocked position, after having passed beyond said guides, and means to enforce the resumption of said plane of said iiaps.

5. In a machine for interlocking an opposite pair of flaps articulated to an erect carton, one of which flaps has at least one tab thereon, and the other of which flap has at least one slot or weakened portion. corresponding thereto, means including guide members, comprising an underneath guide for slotted ilap, an overhead guide for the tongued flap, and one common guide successively serving as an overhead guide for said slotted flap and underneath guide for said tongued ap, for the purpose described.

6. In a machine for interlocking an opposite pair of flaps articulatedto an erect carton one of which flaps has at least one tabthereon, and the other of which flap has at least one slot or weakened portion corresponding thereto, means including' guide members, comprising an underneath guide for slotted ap, an overhead guide for the tongued flap, and one common guide successively serving as an overhead guide for said slotted iiap and underneath guide for said tongued ilap, for the purpose described, the last noted guide progressively tapered and ending` before the overhead guide for the tongued flap ends, whereby the continued pressure of said overhead tongued flap guide, serves to press the tongue into engagement with corresponding flap by causing the tongue to enter the slot, and means for moving the carton with respect to the guides.

'7. In a machine for interlocking a pair of opposite flaps projecting from an erect carton, one of which flaps has a tabthereon, and the other of which flap has at least one corresponding slotted portion thereon, means to convey said carton in the direction of motion parallel to the fold lines of said flaps, stationary guide members located in the path of travel of said flaps and having a contour and located so as to cause successive arching of said slotted flap to bring said slot into open position, and arching said tabbed ap to bring the edge of said tab adjacent to said open slot, for the purpose described.

A 8. In a machine for interlocking a pair of opposite `iiaps projecting from an erect carton, one of which ilaps has a tab thereon, and the other lof which flap has at least one corresponding slothead guide arranged to press the tongue securely into interlocked relation in said slot.

9. In a machine for package closure, a series of moving cages, each adapted to receive and retain an erect carton, with a portion adjoining the base of each cage being slotted or cut away, a stationary support passing through said slotted or cut-away portion during a desired distance of travel of said cages, whereby said support provides a base on which the cartons may rest for said desired distance of travel.

10. In a' machine for package closure, a series of moving cages, each adapted to receive and retain an erect carton, with a portion adjoining one side of each cage being slotted or cut away, and an adjustable stationary guide passing through said slotted or cut-away portion, whereby by adjusting the position of said guide, the cages are adapted to receive cartons of varying thickness, said guide thereby serving as one wall of each cage, providing ready means of altering the dimension of each cage without the necessity of changing the cages themselves.

11. In a machine wherein erect cartons are introducedinto a cage with the forward flap folded back, a cage, and a spring-latch on said cage to retain said ap in folded position, and means to subsequently release said latch.

-12. In combination in a packaging machine,

conveying means having means thereon to receive and retain a lined carton open at both ends, mea'ns to close the liner, means to close the carton flaps over the liner, and means intercepting the path of the conveying means for providing a raised base in said carton receiving means, whereby the closed carton may be inverted, and thereafter supported with its other open end in position to be acted upon by closing means for the other end of the carton.

13. In combination in a packaging machine, conveying means having means thereon to receive and retain a lined carton open at both ends, means to close the liner, means to close the carton flaps over the liner, and means intercepting the path of the conveying means for providing a raised base in said carton receiving means, Whereby the closed carton may be inverted, and thereafter supported with its other open end in position to be acted upon by closing means for the other end of the carton, said carton receiving means having cutaway portions into which said intercepting means project.

14. In a machine for closing an erect carton having projecting liners and open flaps at one end at least, comprising means for closing the liners at said end of the carton while the closing flaps are held out of the way, means for folding the liner out of the way of the carton aps and retaining the liner so folded and means thereafter acting upon the closing flaps for closing them and simultaneously inserting a tongue on one of the top flaps into a slot in the other top flap.

15. In a machine for closing an erect carton having projecting liners and open flaps at one end at least, comprising means for closing the liners at said end of the carton While the closing ilaps are held out of the way, and means thereafter acting upon the closing aps for closing them and/simultaneously inserting a tongue on one of the top flaps into a slot in the other top flap, means for reversing the carton to bring the closed end down, filling means for filling the carton after reversal thereof, and means thereafter acting upon the liner and the flaps at the then upper end of the carton to close them, all of said mechanisms driven together in synchronism.

16. In a machine for closing an erect carton having projecting liners and open flaps at one end at least, comprising means for closing the liners at said end of the carton While the closing flaps are held out of the way, and means thereafter acting upon the closing iiaps for closing them and simultaneously inserting a tongue on one of the-top iiaps into a slot in the other top flap, means for-reversing the carton to bring the closed end down, iilling means for iilling the carton after reversal thereof, and means thereafter acting upon the liner at the then upper end of the carton to close it, followed by means to close the iiaps at the then upper end of the carton including means for simultaneously inserting a tongue on one upper flap into a slot in the other upper flap.

17. In a machine for closing an erect carton having projecting liners and open iiaps at one end at least, comprising means for closing the liners at said end of the carton while the closing flaps are held out of the way, means for folding the liner out of the way of the carton ilaps and retaining the liner so folded and means thereafter acting upon the closing flaps for closing them and simultaneously inserting a tongue on one of the top flaps into a slot in the other top flap, Without disturbing the position of the liner.

18. The mehod of interlocking a pair of opposite carton closure iiaps one of which includes a projecting tongue and the other of which includes a slotted or weakened portion to receive the tongue which consists in imparting to the flaps simultaneously each an upward bend from its juncture line with the carton and a downward bend toward the middle of the carton while the carton is moving, thus bringing the edge of the tongue to the slotted portion and while the flaps are held together, releasing the bends, thus caus ing the tongue to enter the slot.

ROBERT MORRIS BERGSTEIN.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification53/491, 53/170, 53/284
International ClassificationB65B7/20, B65B7/16, B65B7/24
Cooperative ClassificationB65B7/20, B65B7/24
European ClassificationB65B7/20, B65B7/24