Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2207278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1940
Filing dateSep 22, 1937
Priority dateSep 22, 1937
Publication numberUS 2207278 A, US 2207278A, US-A-2207278, US2207278 A, US2207278A
InventorsAlbrecht Joseph A
Original AssigneeAlbrecht Joseph A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for removing surface moisture from lump material
US 2207278 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 9, 1940. J. A. ALBRECHT MACHINE FOR REMOVING SURFACE MOISTURE FROM LUMP MATERIAL Filed Sept. 22, 1957 MINVENTOR ATTORNEYS Patented July 9, 1940 PATENT OFFICE MACHINE Fon REMovrNG SURFACE Mols- 'rUaE FROM LUMP MATERIAL Joseph A. Albrecht, Buffalo, N.,Y.

Application September 22, 1937, Serial No. 165,111

4 Claims.

This invention relates to a machine for removing surface moisture from lump material, and more particularly to a machine for removing adhering moisture from the outer surfaces of lumps 5 of coal.

The main object of the invention 1s to provide a machine of this character which will accomplish this result in a suicient degree at the lowest possible operating expense. Another object of the invention is to provide a machine of this character which will uniformly remove the moisture from substantially every portion of the surface of every individual lump of material. A still further object of the invention is to provide a l5 machine of this character which will be low in initial cost and yet of high capacity and reliable in operation. Numerous other collateral objects of the invention and practical solutions thereof are disclosed in detail in the herein patent specification, wherein- In the accompanying drawing:

Fig. l is a vertical, longitudinal section through the entire machine.

Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are vertical, transverse sections thereof, taken on correspondingly numbered lines of Fig. l.

Similar characters of reference indicate like parts in the several figures of the drawing.

The main frame of the machinemay be constructed in any suitable manner, for instance, by a pair of longitudinal foundationbars I0, Illa connected together transversely by a number of tie bars II, I2 and I3, and supporting three pairs of posts I4, Ida; I5, I5a and I6, IBa to the top of which are secured a pair of upper longitudinal frame bars II, Ila tied together by transverse tie bars I8, I9 and 20 at the upper ends of said posts.

Journaled horizontally and transversely in the front posts I6, I6a. is a head drum or roll 2| around whose peripheral cylindrical surfaces passes the front turn or loop of a lower endless, squeezing belt 22 constructed of sponge rubber or similar, inherently-resilient material. The rear turn or loop of this squeezing belt 22 passes around a tail drum or roll 23 which is suitably journaled in the rear posts I4, Ida and is suitably power driven by any appropriate means. Intermediately of the head roll 2| and the tail roll 23,

the'upper operative stretch of this squeezing belt 22 is supported upon a lower, backing plate or table 24 which is curled forwardly and downwardly at its leading edge 25 so as to ensure that the squeezing belt 22 will not be cut or abraded as it travels horizontally and rearwardly onto and over this baclclng plate. The latter rests at its opposite side edges upon a pair of horizontal, longitudinal angle irons 26, or other suitable supporting members, which are centrally secured to the intermediate posts I5, I5a and are attached 5 at their opposite ends to the lower ends of two pairs of vertical hanger bars 21 and 28. The latter are suitably secured at their upper ends to the upper, longitudinal frame bars I'I, I'Ia, as shown in Fig. 1.

Bearing against the outer surface of the lower squeezing belt 22, but not secured thereto, is a lower drying belt 29 which may be constructed of any fibrous or absorbent material such as thick, loosely woven Canvas belting. This drying 15 belt is adapted to absorb such surface moisture as may be present on the peripheral surfaces of the individual lumps 3D of lump material, such moisture as is absorbed being squeezed out of the lower or idle stretch of said drying belt by a pair 20 of wringing or pressing rolls 3I, 32 which engage with opposite sides of the lower stretch of the lower drying belt and are geared'together at one of their corresponding ends by gears 33, 34 and are suitably power driven in any approved 25 manner as, for instance, by a belt pulley 35. These wringing or pressing rolls are suitably journaled at their opposite ends in the lower parts of the intermediate posts I5, I5a. The

moisture which is squeezed out of the drying belt 30 29 by the wringing rolls 3|, 32 is Caught by a substantially horizontal, transverse trough 36 and is conveyed away to the sewer or elsewhere through a discharge pipe 36I. To permit these wringing rolls 3|, 32 to function properly without inter- 35 ference from the squeezing belt 22 the lower idle or return stretch of the latter is lifted up above the upper wringing roll 3I by a horizontal, transverse deflecting or separating roll 3l which is journaled at its opposite ends on the intermediate posts I5, I5a. 'I'his separating roll 31 also has the function of keeping a proper tension on the squeezing belt 22,-suitable adjustment (not shown) for this purpose being provided, if desired, in any usual and well known manner. Proper tension on the drying belt 29 is main-- tained by a horizontal, transverse smoothing roll 38 which is journaled at the lower ends of a pair of arms 39 that are pivoted at their upper ends by pins 40 on the intermediate posts I5, I5a. Adjustment of the tension on the drying belt 29 may be effected by a pair of weights 4I which are adjustable lengthwise of the arms 39 and are suitably locked in place after being adjusted.

The lump material 30 is fed in a constant stream 55 from a supply bin 42 to the operative front upper part of the drying belt 29.V This bin 42 is provided with a vertical opening 43 which is sumciently large to prevent any arching of the lump material, the latter flowing out of said opening 43 onto an inclined chute 45 and thence down onto the drying belt 29. This ensures a uniform and continuous flow of lump material down the chute 45 without danger of stoppage due to arching In the present machine it is desirable to ensure that the lumps of material be never deposited on the absorbent belt 29 with one lump on top of the other. It is also desirable to turn such lumps as may happen to be lying on an edge so that they will lle fiatwise on the drying belt. To obtain both of these results simultaneously, a vertical, transverse levelling or evening plate 41 is arranged opposite the lower end of the chute 45, said levelling plate having flanges 44 at its opposite ends to engage with the inner vertical faces of the chute 45, and being rendered vertically adjustable by the provision of vertical slots 48 and adjusting bolts 49. The levelling plate 41 is preferably inclined forwardly so that any excess material will be directed upwardly by the levelling plate and overow from the upper edge of the same and carried therefrom to the sides of the machine by overflow chutes 46.

Journaled horizontally and transversely in the hanger bars 21, 28 is an upper, head roll 50 and an upper, tail roll 5| which are similar to the head and tail rolls 2 I, 23 in the lower part of the machine. Similarly an upper endless squeezing belt 52 passes with its front and rear turns around these upper, head and tail rolls 50, 5|, an upper drying belt 53 engages the outer side of the upper squeezing belt, a pair of upper wringing rolls 54, 55 engage with opposite sides of the upper inoperative or return stretch of the upper drying belt, an upper separating roll 56 engages with the upper side of the inoperative stretch of the squeezing belt and deiiects the same downwardly, and an upper smoothing roll 51 engages with the upper side of the upper return or inoperative stretch of the upper drying belt. The smoothing roll 51 is carried by arms 51| which are pivoted on the main frame and this smoothing roll is pressed downwardly against the upper drying belt by weights 512 applied to these arms. The upper wringing rolls are caused to turn in unison by intermeshing gears 513, 514 connected with the corresponding ends thereof. The Water squeezed out of the upper stretch of the upper drying belt is caught in a trough 515 and carried away by a chute 516. Intermediately of the upper, head and tail rolls 50, 5| is arranged an upper backing plate or table 59 which bears against the upper or inner side of the lower operative stretch of the upper squeezing belt and forms the same function as the lower backing plate 24 relative to the lower squeezing belt.

The lower squeezing belt and its companion drying belt are somewhat longer than the upper squeezing and drying belts and the lower squeezing and drying belts have their front parts extending beyond the corresponding parts of the upper squeezing and drying belts in ordei to permit the material delivery chute 45 and associated parts to overhang the front parts of the lower squeezing and drying belts, as shown in Fig. 1. During the operation of the apparatus the upper operative stretches of the lower squeezing and drying belts are arranged close to the lower operative stretches of the upper squeezing and drying belts and preferably the operative stretches of these two drying belts actually engage each other.

Assuming that wet lumps of coal or similar water bearing material of a lumpy character are deposited by the feed device on the front receiving part of the lower drying belt and that the upper and lower squeezing and drying belts are operated so that their opposing operative stretches move at the same rate then the operation of the machine wll be as follows:

As the lower squeezing and drying belts advance, the wet material deposited on the same will be carried underneath the upper squeezing and drying belts and move lengthwise of the machine with tliese belts. During this movement the drying belts, due to the resilient character of the squeezing belts which supports the drying belts on their back sides. are deformed by the shape of the lumps of material whch displace the drying belts so that the latter assume a contour whichcorresponds to that of the respective lumps of material and the same is virtually embedded in the nests or cavities made in the drying belts in conformity with the shape of the several lumps. While the lumps of coal or the like are thus engaged on opposite sides by the drying belts these lumps are moved forwardly with these belts without however turning the lumps because the belts travel at the same rate of speed. When the wet lumps are thus embedded between the upper and lower drying belts each of the lumps is practically engaged over its entire surface by these belts so that the latter operate in the manner of a blotter to remove practically all the moisture from the lumps by the time the same reach the rear turns of the drying and squeezing belts and permit the lumps to be discharged in a practically dry condition from the rear turn of the lower drying belt into a discharge chute 60 whch delivers the dried material to the desired place.

Any coarse particles broken from these lumps during the drying operation and clinging to the upper drying belt are scraped from the rear turn of the latter by a scraper 60| mounted on the main frame close to this turn which coarse materlal removed from the upper drying belt drops onto the adjacent rear part of the lower drying belt and is delivered by the latter to the discharge chute 60. In like manner any coarse particles broken from the lumps during the drying operation and adhering to the lower drying belt will be removed from the latter by a scraper 602 which constitutes the inclined bottom of the discharge chute 60 and causes such coarse material to join that which has been removed from the upper drying belt and to be carried away therewith.

Any small particles which may be detached from the lumps being dried and adhering to the upper and lower drying belts are brushed from these belts by rotary brushes 6|, 62 engaging with the inoperative upper and lower stretches of these belts beyond the Scrapers 60|, 602 which brushes may be journaled on the adjacent parts of the main frame and rotated in the proper direction by any satisfactory means. 'I'he small particles removed from the drying belts by the brushes 6|, 62 are discharged into dust receiving pans or chambers 63, 64 and from the latter these small particles are washed away by streams of water supplied by nozzles 61, 68 and carried away by spouts 65, 66 to any suitable place.

Inasmuch as the drying belts are distorted or wrinkled more or less by the lumps of wet coal being embedded therein during the drying operation these wrinkles or distortions are removed by the smoothing rolls 51, 58 which engage with the respective upper and lower drying belts between the particle removing brushes 6|, 62 and the pairs of wringing rolls 54, 55 and 3|, 32 associated with the corresponding upper and lower drying belts. Each of these smoothing rolls is preferably crowned midway of its length or tapered from its central part toward its opposite ends, as shown in Fig. 4, so that the same upon engaging the respective drying belt will operate to distend or spread out the respective drying belt transversely into curved form from its longitudinal center toward its opposite side edges and thus restore these belts to a smooth condition preparatory to beginning another cycle of lump drying operations.

After the upper and lower drying belts pass the smoothing rolls 51, 38, the same are acted on, respectively, by the upper and lower pairs 5d, 55 and 3|, 32 of wringing rolls which remove from the idle or return stretches of these belts the water which has soaked into them during the operation of drying the wet lumps of coal or other material. This water is pressed out of the drying belts on the rear side of these rollers and to avoid accumulation of water in these localties the drying belts are so shaped adjacent to the wringing rolls that these belts will shed the water extracted from the same. This is preferably accom- ,plished by tapering the lower wringing rolls 55,

36 from the center thereof to their opposite ends and tapering the upper wringing rolls 54, 3i from their opposite ends toward the center thereof, whereby the adjacent parts of each drying belt passing between these wringing rolls will be crowned lengthwise of its center and slope toward its opposite side edges, as shown in Fig. 2, so that the water will flow laterally from these belts into the troughs 58, 36 and be carried away, leaving the belts 53, 29 comparatively dry to continue their drying operation on the wet lumps of material under treatment.

If desired the two sets of drying and squeezing belts may be moved one faster than the other whereby the lumps of material between the opposing operative stretches while in engagement with this material will cause the same to roll or tumble and thus bring all parts of the surface of such lumps in contact with the drying belts and ensure removal of the maximum amount of water or moisture therefrom.

While the, operative stretches are thus engaged with the lumps of coal or the like these belts yield and conform to the shapeof these lumps so that in effect these lumps are nested in these belts and the latter practically enveloped or are wrapped partly around the lumps without however crushing the lumps or reducing the same in size, this being due to the cushioning and yielding capacity of the squeezing belts which back up the drying belts and support the same in whatever form they may assume.

It is therefore possible by the use of this apparatus to thoroughly dry the coal after the same has been washed and thus avoid freezing the same in a mass during the cold season and also furnishing a more acceptable product to the trade.

I claim as my invention:

1. A machine for removing moisture from the Surface of lump material including two endless .drying belts of fibrous material having opposing operative stretches which receive the material to be dried between them and remove the moisture therefrom, endless squeezing belts of resilient deformable material supporting said drying belts on the back thereof and permitting the latter to conform to the shape of the material being dried,

wringing means for removing moisture from the idle stretch of each of said drying belts, and deflecting means for holding the idle stretch of each squeezing belt out of engagement from the idle stretch of the companion drying belt adjacent to said wringing means.

2. A machine for removing moisture from the surface of lump material including two endless drying belts of fibrous material having opposing operative stretches which receive the material to be dried between them and remove the moisture therefrom, endless squeezing belts of resilient deformable material supporting said drying belts on the back thereof and permitting the latter to conform to the shape of the material being dried, wringing means for removing moisture from the idle stretch of each of said drying belts, and smoothing means engaging the idle stretch of each of said drying belts in advance of said wringing means and operating to remove wrinkles or unevenness from said drying belts.

3. In a drying apparatus, the combination comprising a pair of conveyor belts disposed one over the other with the lower run of the upper belt substantially parallel to and adjacent to the upper run of the lower belt, each belt including a separable outer part composed of a capillary absorbent medium and an inner part having a resiliency and thickness suicient to embed and surround a substantial area of articles fed between the belts, means for removing liquid from the absorbent outer parts of the belts, means for guiding and driving the belts so that the lower run of the upper belt and the upper run of the lower belt move in the same direction simultaneously, means for feeding articles between the adjacent runs of the two belts and means for receiving the articles discharged from Athe belts.

4. In a drying apparatus, the combination comprising a pair of conveyor belts disposed one over the other with the lower run of the upper belt substantially parallel to and adjacent to the upper run of the lower belt, each belt including a separable outer part composed of a capillary absorbent medium and an inner part having a resiliency and thickness sufiicient to embed and surround a substantial area of articles fed between the belts, means for separating the inner .and outer parts of said upper belt along the upper run thereof, means for separating the inner and outer parts of said lower belt along the lower run thereof, means for removing .liquid from the separated absorbent parts of each of said belts, means for guiding and driving the belts so that the lower run of the upper belt and the upper run of the lower belt move in the same direction simultaneously, means for feeding articles between the adjacent runs of the two belts and means for receiving articles discharged from the belts.

JOSEPH A. AIBRECH'I. n

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2500075 *Jan 12, 1948Mar 7, 1950Hartford Empire CoApparatus for and method of drying containers
US2504932 *Jul 22, 1947Apr 18, 1950Gibbs & Company IncCan drying machine
US2658855 *Jun 27, 1951Nov 10, 1953Socony Vacuum Oil Co IncDeoiling wax
US2682287 *Mar 31, 1949Jun 29, 1954Rollins Jr Brook HSkin removing device
US3017821 *Jun 26, 1956Jan 23, 1962Brown Citrus Machinery CorpFruit juice extractor
US3018563 *Jul 27, 1959Jan 30, 1962Southwestern Illinois Coal CorCoal dewatering apparatus
US3051973 *Jun 12, 1958Sep 4, 1962Jacques Francis GAbsorptive earth-drying apparatus
US3094919 *Feb 14, 1961Jun 25, 1963Brown Citrus Machinery CorpFruit juice extractor
US3207061 *Jul 8, 1963Sep 21, 1965Zaromb SolomonApparatus and method for separating slurries into solid and fluid components
US3245155 *May 31, 1962Apr 12, 1966Hoover Ball & Bearing CoApparatus for drying sausages and the like
US3405453 *Oct 21, 1965Oct 15, 1968Ries GottfriedMethod and apparatus for drying objects such as cars
US3441420 *Dec 11, 1967Apr 29, 1969Burroughs CorpInk formulation
US3525160 *May 10, 1968Aug 25, 1970Jiri DokoupilProcess and arrangement for drainage of wet leather and similar fibrous material
US3613564 *Aug 13, 1969Oct 19, 1971Gen Am TransportSludge-dewatering apparatus
US3699881 *Jul 26, 1971Oct 24, 1972Gen Am TransportSludge dewatering apparatus
US3973329 *Nov 5, 1974Aug 10, 1976Hoechst AktiengesellschaftProcess and device for drying synthetic fibrous material
US4027400 *Jan 6, 1975Jun 7, 1977Swift And Company LimitedFluid removal in food processing, method and apparatus
US4112586 *Dec 9, 1976Sep 12, 1978Oy. Tampella AbMethod of drying a cardboard or a paper web and drying device for applying this method
US4115275 *Apr 14, 1977Sep 19, 1978Morris William ESludge dewatering apparatus
US4186098 *Jun 8, 1978Jan 29, 1980Morris William ESludge dewatering apparatus
US5291666 *Apr 23, 1993Mar 8, 1994International Paper CompanyApparatus for drying roll material
US5330341 *Jun 4, 1993Jul 19, 1994Kemcast Partners-1989Process and apparatus for continuous three-dimensional forming of heated thermoplastic materials
US5458477 *Jun 23, 1994Oct 17, 1995Kemcast Partners-1989Apparatus for continous three-dimensional forming of heated thermoplastic materials
US5505599 *Dec 13, 1993Apr 9, 1996Kemcast Partners-1989Continuous 3-D forming machine and endless flexible forming belts for forming three-dimensional products from thermoplastic materials
US6195908 *Oct 23, 1997Mar 6, 2001D.S.P. N.V.Method and device for thermal drying of a solid product in small pieces
US8092691Mar 9, 2010Jan 10, 2012Univenture, Inc.Method and apparatus for separating particles from a liquid
US8286801Jan 9, 2012Oct 16, 2012Univenture, Inc.Method and apparatus for separating particles from a liquid
DE974673C *Mar 6, 1953Mar 23, 1961David TannWasch- und Trockenmaschine
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/95, 34/85, 100/118, 34/118
International ClassificationF26B17/00, F26B17/02
Cooperative ClassificationF26B17/026
European ClassificationF26B17/02C