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Publication numberUS2207420 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1940
Filing dateSep 20, 1939
Priority dateSep 20, 1939
Publication numberUS 2207420 A, US 2207420A, US-A-2207420, US2207420 A, US2207420A
InventorsCarl M Thomas
Original AssigneeCarl M Thomas
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window covering
US 2207420 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 9, 1940. C, M, fHOMAs 2,207,420

WINDOW COVERING n Filed Sept. 20. 1939I 3 Sheets-Sheet l T Tf," z5 24 25 I3' 1 A l Il CQ I 46 L lL. /l' l1 T fu I' 45 65 5a 40 #l INVENTOR Y CM2 .M THUN/15 July 9, 1940.

c. M. THOMAS WINDOW COVERING Filedv Sept 20, 1939 s sheds-sheet 2 BY 64m 7r'f/MA5 v ATTORNEY July 9, 1940- c. M. THOMAS 2,207,420

wINDow covERING v Filed Sept. 20, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR CARL M. THU/M5 Patented July 9, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT vor-Flca WINDOW covEnlNG Carl M. Thomas, Forest Hills, N. Y. Application september 2o, 1939,7seria1 No. 295,729

20 Claims.

This invention relates to a window covering, and more particularly to a window covering in the nature of a shade that can be rolled up out of the way, or pulled down and adjusted in a lowered position to admit anydesired amount of light.

In addition to the conventional window cover- `ings known as shades and Venetian blinds, it has been proposed heretofore to employ a window covering consisting of a number of parallel strips of material that may be rolled up and arranged so that when fully lowered, the strips of material may be twisted about vertical axes.

Such a device has many advantages over other window coverings, particularly when the strips overlap each other slightly, in that the strips may be made of various coloredy fabrics containing individual designs or forming diierent designs in different pivoted positions. Such fabric strips in some instances will eliminate the need for glass curtains for a window, and thus serve the dual purpose of a shade and curtain. In addition, the provision of strips of material that can be pivoted simultaneously on vertical axes permits a greater degree` of regulation, both in the iiow of air through an 4open window and in the-admission or exclusion of light, than is obtainable with ordinary Venetian blinds.

Proposals heretofore made for utilizing strips of material on a roll as a window covering have not proved practical, however, because of the complicated mechanism and construction that has always been considered necessary to provide for smooth operation. Such mechanism and construction has also increased excessively the cost of making the window coverings.

A particular problem has been the diiliculty in getting overlapping strips of fabric to roll up on a roller uniformly without moving sideways or forming bunches.

One object of my invention is the provision of an improved window covering constructed from a plurality of strips of material adapted to roll up on a single roll and arranged to be pulled down 45 to a position in which the individual strips can be pivoted easily and simultaneously about their longitudinal axes.

Another object is the provision of such a window covering that is economical to manufac- 50 ture and easy to install'and operate.

Another object is to provide such a window covering that is adjustable for installation in windows of different Widths as well as windows of different lengths.

A further object of the invention is to provide (ci. s-'41) such a window covering in which the individual strips of fabric or other material can be readily adjusted to a uniform tension when the device is installed in a window.

Another object is to provide a device of this 5 character utilizing an ordinary roller of the type used for ordinary roller shades.

Further objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description of one embodiment of my invention shown in the accom- 10 panying drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a front elevation of a window frame showing my improved window covering installed therein in the fully lowered position with the individual strips inclined at lan oblique angle to 15 the plane of the window frame.

Fig. 2 is an elevational View on an enlarged scale similar to Figure 1 but showing the upper left-hand corner of the device in Figure 1 with the strips al1 disposed in the same plane.

Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view through the fabric strips shown in Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line l--l of Figure 2. e

Figure 5 is a vertical sectional view through 25 the roller similar to Figure 4 butshowing the fabric in a partially rolled up position.

Figures 6 and 7 are perspective views of clamps for supporting the upper ends of the strips.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of a clip for 30 holding the fabric in the clamps shown in Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 9 is a horizontal sectional view through approximately the center of the adjusting bar and clamps for the lower ends of the strips showing these strips in the closed or overlapping position. 7

Figure 10 is a view similar to Figure 9 but showing the strips in the fully opened position.

Figure 11 is a vertical sectional view taken on 40 the line lI-Ii of Figure 9.

Figure 12 is a perspective view of one of the removable clamps for the lower ends of the strips. c

Figure 13 is a perspective view oi' a clip for 5 holding the strips against the clamps shown in Figure 12.

Figure 14 is a perspective view of a section oi' one of the adjusting bars at the lower ends of n the strips.

The embodiment of my invention illustrated in the drawing consists of an ordinary spring operated window shade roller I0 which may be mounted in suitable brackets Il and I2 fixed to the sides of a window frame I3. As is customary with shade rollers, the bracket I I may be provided with a round opening to receive the round end I4 of the shade roller and the bracket I2 may' be provided with a slot to receive the key piece-:I5 of the shade roller that is associated with the usual internal spring. 'I'he shade roller I0k may be constructed and operated in the usual manner with internal pawls and a ratchet (not shown) to hold the roller in a number of diierent positions while the spring is under tension, as is well understood in the art.

A pair of longitudinal grooves I6 and I1 may be cut into the roller Ill extending radially into the roller and spaced about 90 apart. A plurality of sleeve elements I8 of identical construction, except for the element I8a on one end of the roller which is preferably made a little longer than the others, may be formed with flanges I 9 and 20 positioned to slide into the grooves I6 and I1, respectively, on the roller I0.

At points suitably spaced from the flanges I9 and 20, small tabs 2I may be cut out on each end of the sleeve elements I8 and folded inwardly so that the ends of the tabs will bear on Vthe surface of the roller I The sleeve elements I9 and IIa are preferably constructed with a generally cylindrical shape. except for the opening between the flanges I9 and 20. These sleeve elements may be slid onto the roller III to produce a structure which in effect is a roller of uniformly increased diameter. The sleeve elements are thus positively held in position by the tabs 2l and flanges I9 and 20, and rotated as an integral part of the roller Ill. The sleeve elements may, however, be easily moved lengthwise of the roller so that they are spaced apart from each other a greater or lesser distance as desired.

Slots 22 are cut through the flanges 20, preferably in the central portion of the flange 20 for the element I8a, and nearer one end of the sleeve elements in the remaining sleeve elements I8. These slots 22 are relatively narrow and are cut through from the edge of the flange 20 to a point just beyond the angle that the flange 20 makes with the cylindrical portions of the sleeve elements.

A number of strips of fabric 23 are held at their upper ends in the clamps 24 and 25. These clamps 24 and 25 each have a body portion 26 curved about substantially the same radius of curvature as the sleeve elements I8 and I8a. The upper edges of the clamps 24 and 25 are rolled to provide a cylindrical section 21 having a relatively small radius of curvature. The body portions 26 and one end of cylindrical portions 21 are cut out at 28, and at the opposite end of the clamps 24 and 25 the body portions 26 are cut out as indicated at 29, for a purpose described below.

Centrally of the clamps 24 and 25, the rolled sections 21 are provided with slots 30 having en'- larged openings 3I near one end. I'hree bead sections 32 of an ordinary bead chain may thus be used to pivotally connect the clamps 24 and 25 to the elements I8 and IBa. One bead of the chain sections 32 is positioned inside of one of the sleeve members I8 or I8a by sliding it down through the slot 22. chain sections 32 is introduced into the slots 30 by pushing the lowermost bead through the openings 3|.

Clamps 24 and 25 are also provided with inwardly turned flanges having rows of serrations or teeth 33 on their upper edges and a number of slotted openings 34 spaced a short distance from The other end of the bead the teeth 33. The flanges 35 on clamps 24 carrying the teeth 33 are relatively long and have cut out sections 36 at each end. The flanges 31 on clamps 24 carrying the teeth 33 are relatively short, just long enough to provide room for the slotted openings 34.

The upper ends of the fabric strips 23 are brought over the teeth 33, which grip it uniformly throughout its width. Clips 38 provided with the punched out pins 39 are then pressed from the inside of the clamps 24 and 25 against the fabric, so that the pins 39 project through the fabric and the slotted openings 34. It will be seen that this arrangement provides a uniform grip on the upper ends of the strips 23, the teeth 33 holding the strips evenly throughout their width.

Clamps 24 and 25 are suspended from alternate sleeve elements I8 and I8a. That is, the clamps 25 are .suspended from sleeve element I la and from every second sleeve element I8 as seen in Figure 1. The clamps 24 are suspended from the intermediate sleeve elements I8. This enables` the clamps 24 and 25 and the strips 23 held thereby to be rotated through an angle of approximately 180 while the strips may be overlapped at their edges when they are in the plane of the window frame I3 (Fig. 2).

'I'he lower ends of the fabric strips 23 are pivotally connected to a guide bar 40. Bar 49 may be made conveniently in the form of a channel bar with the base of the bar facing the room. Other forms and shapes of a guide bar may, of course, be employed. At its ends, the channel bar 40 is provided with suitable openings 4I to permit the bar to slide up and down the bead chains 42.

Bead chains 42 are suspended at the top from suitable brackets 43, which may be separated from or formed integrally with the brackets II and I2 that support the shade roller I0. Preferably the brackets 43 are mounted in the window frame I3 some distance inwardly towards the room and below the centers of the brackets II and I2. The general line of the bead chain .when installed is indicated by the dot dash line 44 in Figure 4. The bead chains 42 are preferably stretched tight and held at their lower ends by suitable eyelets 45.

In order to hold the bar 4Il in its lowest position, sleeves 46 may be provided at each end of the bar 40 and arranged to slide'on the bar. Sleeves 45 may be provided with slots 41 at their ends to engage the bead chains 42, and tabs 48 may be punched out and bent outwardly of the sleeves 46 to facilitate moving the sleeves back and forth by hand.

The lower ends of the .fabric strips 23 may be held in suitable clamps 49, which are preferably made of fiat pieces of metal provided with punched out tabs 50 on each end to receive the lugs 5I on the ends of clips 52. Clips 52 may be constructed with inwardly extending flanges 53 carrying a row of teeth 54 and upwardly extending body portions at substantially right angles or slightly less to the flange 53. The lugs 5I on the clips 52 may be snapped into place to rotate in the openings in the tabs 50, with the teeth 54 eX- tending inwardly toward the clamps 49. The lower ends of the strips of fabric 23 may be then pulled down against the body of the clamps 49 around the lower portion of the clips 52 (Fig. 1l) After the strips have been pulled tight with the bar 4I) in its lowermost position, the ends of the strips may be cut off, the clips 52 pressed in against the clamp 49 to secure the fabric strip in position, and the loose ends of the strips tucked into the slots 55 inthe clips 52.

The clamps 49 are provided centrally along their lower edge with rolled sections 56 in which are cut slots 51 with enlarged openings 58 at one end. Short sections 59 of bead chain may be inserted in the slots 51 through the opening 58, and into slotted openings 60 spaced uniformly apart from each Yother on the bar 40. In this manner, the clamps 49 holding the lowenends of the fabric strips 23 may be pivotally connected to the guide bar 40.

To provide for simultaneous rotation of the clamps 49 and the strips carried thereby, the clamps may have pivotally connected to each end by the pins 6Ia, the double barreled hinge members 8|. One barrel of the hinge members 6I provides the pivotal connection to the clamps 49 while the other barrel is adapted to receive pins 62 passed through suitable openings in the front and rear adjusting bars 63 and 64.

The front bar 63 may have a suitable knob 63a so that it can be moved longitudinally by hand. The clamp 49 holding the strip 23 on the lefthand side of the device as viewed in Figure 1, may have fixed thereto a special shield member 65 disposed at an angle to the body of the clamp 49 to provide a continuous appearance with the front bar 63 when it is moved to the extreme right-hand or closed position. vIt will be understood that the bars 40, 63 and 64 may each be constructed of channel bar stock, preferably being made in two or more sections that telescope together, as indicated in Figure 14, and having aplurality of openings 66 to allow the bars to be adjusted to any suitable length and to provide for spacing the clamps 49 at any desired interval.

The fabric that I prefer to employ consists of a fabric having a weave with a thicker section in the middle than at the edges. I prefer to employ a fabric in which the central portion is at least twice as thick as the edges thereof. This permits the strips of fabric 23 to be yrolled up on the roller I0 in an overlapping position and still provide a uniform rolling action, as well as a smooth appearance when the window covering is completely rolled up.

My improved window covering is economical to manufacture and easy to install. Any length of shade roller may be used and should, of course, be selected to fit the window. The shade rollers may be supplied to consumers with an appropriate number of sleeve elements IB in place having the clamps 24 and 25 and fabric strip 23 connected thereto. After installation of the shade roller brackets II and I2, the brackets 43 and eyelets 45 are fixed in place and the bead chains 42 are stretched tight between their respective bracket 43 and eyelet 45. Before fastening the lower ends of the chains 42, they are preferably passed through the openings 4I in the guide bar 4D.

The bar may then be clamped in its lowermost position by sliding the sleeves 46 outwardly to engage the beads on chains 42. The clamps 49 may be previously connected to bar 40 and to the bars 63 and 64, although it may be necessary to adjust thc lengths of these bars to t the particular Window frame in question, and to adjust the positions of the clamps 49.

The roller I0 is then placed in its brackets and the -strips 23 are unrolled. The lower ends of the strips are pulled tight after being threaded through the clamps 49, and the clips 52 are then snapped shut to hold the strips 23 in place. The

free endsof the strips 23 are then cut oil and what is left is tucked into the slots 55.

In the operation of my device, the strips are rolled up or unrolled by simply raising or lowering the bar 40 in the same manner that an ordinary window shade is raised or lowered. To rotate the strips, the bar 40 is pulled down until the strips have been unrolled to their extreme length as shown in Figure 1.

By cutting the grooves I6 and Il in the shade roller I0 an. appropriate distance around the roller from the ratchet teeth and pawls inside the shade roller, it is possible to provide a stopping point for the shade roller just short of the position of the device shown in Figure 1. Thus,

when the bar 40 is pulled down to the extremel position shown in Figure I', it must be held down or the spring will roll up the shade roller a quarter turn more or less.

By pulling the bar 40 down to the extreme position and locking it in this position with the sleeves 46, the strips 23 are placed under uniform tension and do not look uneven lor have a tendency to flutter in the wind.

This aise provides a start for romng up the' strips 23 on the roller. With the bar 40 unlocked, it may be pulled down with a sharp quick movement to release the pawls in the shade roller and thus utilize the spring for rolling up the strips..

By grasping the handle 63a and moving the bar 63 to the right or left when the bar 40 is locked down, the strips 23 are rotated about their longitudinal axes to let in a greater or lesser amount of light as may be desired. Ventilation may be regulated in the same way by adjusting the strips vto any desired position so that ,air is deflected sideways to one side or the other'or directed straight into the room.

It will be apparent that each strip 23 is provided by the bead chain sections 32 and 59 with by rotating the bottom portion of a strip when yit is under tension, it will likewise rotate the strip a similar amount at the top.

. I'he provision of strips 23 in overlapping position makes it possible to completely close the covering by moving the bar 63 either to its extreme right or left-hand positions, thus providing a window covering that is solid in appearance and eliect.

A problem that has been encountered in previous attempts to make devices-of this character with strips overlapping has been the uneven rolling of the fabric strips as the device is rolled up. It will be apparent that the clamps 24 and are so constructed as to fit exactly into the space between the flanges I9 and 20 on the sleeve elements I8 and I 8a as the strips are rolled up. 'I'he body portions 26 of the clamps 24 and 25 complement and complete the cylindrical shape of the sleeves I8 and I 8a. This provides a substantially smooth cylinder on which the strips 23 are rolled.

By utilizing fabric having selvage edges much thinner than thecentral portions, there is no tendency for the strips to creep sidewise as they are rolled and they do not have any tendency to stretch along their edges, giving a ragged appearance when the window covering is pulled down.

A particular advantage of the window covering according to my invention is its adjustability to diiferent sizes of windows. With a suitable number of sleeve elements I8, a shade roller of the proper length may be selected and the elements i8 uniformly spaced on the roller a greater or less distance apart as may be needed. The number of sleeve elements I8 will, of course, be determined by the length of the roller I0. guiding and adjusting bars 40, 63 and 6l made extensible in length and provided with a number of openings holding the lower clamps, the device is adapted to fit windows of varying width.

Variations in length may be achieved by cutting oif the strips 23 when the device is installed in a window as previously described. While a number of parts are employed in my window covering, they may all be made quite economically because so many of them are alike. Many of the metal parts can be readily stamped out of sheet .metal such as aluminum or its alloys, and the other metal parts may be easily fashioned out of bar stock.

The terms and expressions which I have employed are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and I have no intention, in the use of such terms and expressions, of excluding any equivalents of the features shown and described or portions thereof, but recognize that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.

I claim:

1. A window covering comprising roller means, a plurality of strips of flexible material pivotally suspended from said roller means for free rotation about their longitudinal axes in a fully lowered position and adapted to be rolled up on said roller means, and means connected to the lower ends of said strips for rotating the strips simultaneously about said longitudinal axes.

2. A window covering comprising roller means, a plurality of strips of flexible material pivotally suspended from said roller means for free rotation about their longitudinal axes in a fully lowered position, spring means associated with said roller means for rolling up said strips thereon, and means connected to the lower ends of said strips for rotating 'the strips slrnultaneously about said longitudinal axes.

3. A window covering comprising roller means, a plurality of strips of flexible material pivotally suspended from said roller means for rotation about their longitudinal axes and constructed and arranged to be rolled up on said roller means with their edges overlapping each other,A and means connected to the lower ends of said strips for rotating the strips simultaneously about said longitudinal axes, said strips having central portions substantially thicker than said overlapping edges.

4. A window covering comprising roller means, a plurality of strips of flexible material pivotally suspended from said roller means for rotation about their longitudinal axes and adapted to bel rolled up on said roller means, means connected to the lower ends of said strips for maintaining said strips undertension, and means associated with the strips near their lower ends for rotating the strips simultaneously about their said longitudinal axes.

5. A window covering comprising a roller, a plurality of fabric strips, and a plurality of clamps for said strips, said clamps being pivotally connected to said roller and constructed to lie against said roller to form a substantially cylindrical surface on which said strips may be rolled.

6. A window covering as defined in claim 5 in With the which the ends oi' the strips are removably attached to the clamps.

7. A window covering as defined in claim 5 in which the strips of fabric have thick central portions and relatively thin edges to roll up uniformly overlapping each other on the roller.

8. Window covering apparatus comprising a shade roller, a plurality of sleeve' members iixed on said roller, a plurality of fabric strips, and a plurality of clamp members for holding said strips,said clamp members being pivotally connected to said sleeve members.

9. Apparatus as defined in claim 8 in which the strips are held at the edges of the clamp members and the sleeve members are pivotally connected to opposite edges of said clamp members.

10. In apparatus of the character described, a shade roller, a plurality of individual sleeve members arranged to rotate with said roller but adjustable longitudinally thereof, clamp members pivotally secured to said sleeve members, and individual fabric strips held by said clamp members and adapted to be rolled on said sleeve members.

l1. Apparatus as defined in claim i0 in which the clamp members are substantially the same width as the fabric strips and have end portions shaped to permit the fabric strip to be rolled up in overlapping relationship.

12. In apparatus of the character described, a shade roller, a plurality of fabric strips pivotally suspended from said roller for free rotation about their longitudinal axes and adapted to be rolled up simultaneously thereon, a bar, means for pivotally securing the lower ends of said stri s to said bar in spaced relation to each other, an means for guiding said bar through a predetermined substantially vertical path.

13. In apparatus of the character described, roller means, a plurality of fabric strips pivotally suspended from said means and adapted' to be rolled up simultaneously thereon, a bar, means for pivotally securing the lower ends of said strips to said bar in spaced relation to each other, guides for guiding said bar through a predetermined substantially vertical path, and means for clamping said bar to said guides to place said strips under tension.

i4. In apparatus of the character described, roller means, a plurality of fabric strips pivotally suspended from said means and adapted to be rolled up simultaneously thereon, a bar, means for pivotally securing the lower ends of said strips to said bar in spaced relation to each other, and means for holding said bar in its lowermost position to maintain said strips under tension.

15e In apparatus of the character described, a shade roller, a plurality of individual sleeve members arranged to rotate with said roller but adjustable longitudinally thereof, clamp members pivotally secured to said sleeve members, individualfabric strips held by said clamp members and adapted to be rolled on said sleeve members, a bar of adjustable length, and means for pivotally securing the lower ends of said strips to said bar in spaced relationship corresponding to the spacing of said sleeve members.

16. In apparatus of the character described, roller means, a plurality of fabric strips having their ends pivotally supported by said roller means for free rotation about their longitudinal axes and adapted to roll up thereon, a bar, and a plurality of clamps pivotally secured to said bar for holding the lower ends of said strips, said clamps having means permitting adjustment of the length of said strips.

17. In apparatus of the character described, a roller, and a plurality of fabric strips pivotally suspended therefrom for rotation about vertical Aaxes and arranged to roll up on said roller with their edges overlapping each other, said strips having central portions at least twice as thick as said edges.

18. A window covering comprising a shade roller, sleeve means on said roller forming an interrupted cylindrical surface, a plurality of strips of exible material, a plurality of rigid members attached to the upper ends of said strips, and means connecting said rigid members to said sleeve means to suspend said strips therefrom and permit said strips to be rolled up on said sleeve means in overlapping position, said rigid members being constructed to fit the interrupted portion of said sleeve means when the strips are completely cylindrical surface.

19. A window covering as defined in claim 18 in which the strips have central portions thicker than the overlapping edges to permit the strips to be rolled up smoothly on a cylindrical surface.

20. A window covering comprising a roller, a plurality of strips of ilexible material pivotally suspended from said roller for rotation about their longitudinal axes and adapted to be rolled up in overlapping .position on said roller. means for placing said strips under tension in the unrolled position, and means near the lower ends of thel strips for rotating said strips about their longitudinal axes simultaneously and throughout their length while said strips are under tension.

CARL M. THOMAS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4641700 *Feb 17, 1984Feb 10, 1987Zveibil Salvador MCurtain of windable oscillating blades
US4655195 *Dec 24, 1985Apr 7, 1987Solara, Inc.Solar heat regulator
US4794971 *Feb 6, 1987Jan 3, 1989Viktor LohausenAwning
US4911220 *Apr 1, 1988Mar 27, 1990Hiller Kevin LReplaceable decorative louver covering system
US5101876 *Jan 30, 1991Apr 7, 1992Zak Helga MLouver covering system
US5320155 *Dec 14, 1992Jun 14, 1994Bressler Terry LVertical blind and slat structure therefor
US7624784Apr 28, 2006Dec 1, 2009Hunter Douglas Inc.Segmented roll up covering for architectural openings
US20070251652 *Apr 28, 2006Nov 1, 2007Hunter Douglas North AmericaSegmented roll up covering for architectural openings
US20110214822 *Sep 8, 2011Shih-Ming LinWindow blind assembly
US20140345811 *May 21, 2014Nov 27, 2014Gary McDanielGarage door opening covering
DE3400242C1 *Jan 5, 1984Mar 28, 1985Viktor LohausenSonnenschutz
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/121.1, 160/176.10V, 160/900, 160/133, 160/196.1
International ClassificationE06B9/36
Cooperative ClassificationY10S160/90, E06B9/367, E06B9/36
European ClassificationE06B9/36, E06B9/36F