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Publication numberUS2207504 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 9, 1940
Filing dateDec 21, 1938
Priority dateDec 24, 1937
Publication numberUS 2207504 A, US 2207504A, US-A-2207504, US2207504 A, US2207504A
InventorsBohm Otto
Original AssigneeRca Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Aerial system
US 2207504 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 9, 1940. Q 3614 2,207,504

AERIAL SYSTEM Filed Dec. 21, 1938 41% MUM 11 Ki NI I I ZI 152i fwkw H'UWR INVENTQR OTTO BOHM ATTORNEY Patented July 9, 1940 2,207,504":

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE- AERIAL SYSTEM Otto Biihm, Hutton, Brentwood, England, assignor to Radio Corporation of America, a corporation of Delaware Application December 21, 1938, Serial No. 247,004 In Great Britain December 24, 1937 10 Claims.

It is well known to obtain directional efiects in aerial systems by providing at the end of an aerial conductor system a terminating resistance which is equal to the surge impedance of said system so that the current in the system is in mitter T by a receiver. 5; one direction only. Aerial systems of this kind Known aerial systems of the kind referred to are well known and in general fall into one or and of which the above three known systems other of two classes, namely, that in which the are examples, sufi'er from the defect that there conductor system is essentially of the single is a considerable loss of energy in the terminat-' conductor type and is earthed at the far end ing ohmic resistance. This defect is serious 10 through a resistance equal to the surge impedboth in the case of transmission and in the case ance and that in which the conductor system is of reception and the present invention seeks to essentially of the two conductor type, the two overcome this defect by eliminating the ohmicconductors being connected together at the far resistance in question. end through a resistance equal to the surge im- According to this invention an aerial system 15;

pedance. In either class the aerial system may comprises two conductor systems arranged close consist of the conductor system alone or the said together so as to be tightly radiation coupled, conductor system may be provided at suitable one of said system being directly arthed f intervals, with short, usually transverse radiators short circuited at the far end and the other bein respect of which it acts as a feeder system. ing left open circuited at the far end, and means 20 Three typical known aerial systemsof the kind are provided for building p n a d Conductor in question will now be described and, with refsystems stationarywaves of the same amplitude erence to Figures 1, 2 and 3 of the accompanying but with a mutual phase displacement of drawing, the manner in which these systems The easiest way to appreciatethe underlying may be modified to be in accordance with this theory of the invention is to consider what is invention will be described with reference to probably the simplest embodiment thereof, Figures 1A, 2A and 3A of the drawing, Figure namely the case (not illustrated) where therelA showing the antenna of Figure 1 modified are two simple parallel straight wires run closely according to the invention and similarly with adjacent to one another, one being directly respect to Figures 2A and 3A. In the first of earthed at the far end and the other-being left these systems, Which is illust te y Figure open at the far end. The wires are energized I there is e p yed simp y a Single Wire W1 which, at the near ends by currents of the same ampliin the case of a transmitter aerial, is energized tud'e t in phase quadrature There 111 be at one end by a transmitter T and is earthed at current node a the end of one Wire and a the other through a resistance R equal to the current anti-node at the far end of the other. 351 siiirge1 htfipedgnce. This1 iivire1 W1 starts 3 f a l? The current I1 at the end of the earthed cona ai eaovegroun eve,sopesup or a p its length to a point H of maximum height, and dilctor is gwen by the eXp-ressmn then slopes down to a little above ground level I 005 t at its earthed end. In the second of these sys- )t w 9 tems-which is illustrated by Figure 2 two similar wires W1, We are employed, these wires beg g i g wave length and x the distance ing arranged so that, in plan view, they together The current I2 at the end of the Open embrace a diamond shape except for the acute ductor is given by v angled ends. The transmitter T is connected Y 45 between the wires at one end i. e. at one acute 12:1 sin cos wt 4 I angled end of the diamond, and a resistance R 1 equal to the surge impedance is connected Since the conductors are in close proximity tween the wires at the other end of the diamond. and thus tightly coupled by radiation, the In the third of these Systems illustrated by sult'ant effect is equivalent to that of a single 50 Figure 3, two Straight, closely adjacent parallel conductor fed with the algebraic sum of the twoeS 1. W2, are provided With Suitably Spaced currents I1 and I2. In other words, the resultshort transverse radiators D1, Dc, those (D1) am urrent In may be written in the form connected to one wire (W1) projecting to one 2 side and those (D2) connected to the other (W2) 1 i 55 projecting to the other. Each radiator wire D1 I connected to one wire W1 is opposite to and in The first of the three known systems (that'of' the same straight'line with a radiator wire D2 Figure 1), hereinbefore described, may be modiconnected to We. The transmitter T is confied as shown in Figure 1A to be in accordance nected between the wires W1, W2, at one end with this invention by dispensing with the earth- 86 and a resistance R, equal to the surgeimpedance ing resistance R of Figure 1 (leaving the wire W1 open at the far end) and providing a second,

- similar, conductor W1 closely adjacent the first conductor, and directly earthed at the far end.

Both conductors are energized, in the case of;a

transmitter, at their near end by currents of the same amplitude but in phase quadrature/ This energization is represented by two circles representing transmitters T1, T2 though in prac-' tice, of course, there would probably be only one transmitter giving the required two quadrature outputs.

The second of the three known systems hereinbefore described (that of Figure 2) may be as shown in Figure 2A modified to be in accordance with this invention by dispensing with the resistance R between the two wires at one end of the diamond and providing another diamond arrangement of two wires W1, W2, adjacent the first wires W1 and W2 and similar thereto except that the two wires W1, W2 of the second diamond are directly connected together at the end where the Wires W1, W2 of the first diamond are left open. The two diamond arrangements are energized at their near ends by currents of the same amplitude but in phase quadrature.

The third of the three known systems hereinbefore described (that of Figure 3) may be modified as shown in Figure 3A to be in accordance with this invention by dispensing with the resistance R at the ends of the two wires and providing a second two wire feeder and associated radiator system closely adjacent the first. The second system is marked with the same references as the first with prime marks af'ixed thereto. The two two-wire feeder and associated radiator systems are alike except that, in the second system the two wires of the feeder are directly connected together at the far end while the radiators thereof are arranged to come midway between the radiators of the first system. The two systems are fed in phase quadrature by currents of the same amplitude.

Any of the embodiments of this invention may be used for reception. In the case of a transmitter both systems in any embodiment may be energized from the same source via any suitable amplitude and phase determining circuits as known per se, while, in the case of reception, the desired conditions can be realized by suitable coupling of the two systems to av common receiver.

Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of my said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, I declare that what I claim is:

1. An aerial system comprising two conductor systems arranged close together so as to be tightly radiation coupled, one of said systems being directly earthed at the far end and the other being left open circuitedat the far end, and means for building up on said conductor systems stationary waves of the same amplitude but with a mutual phase displacement of 90.

2. An aerial system comprising two conductor systems arranged close together so a sto be tightly radiation coupled, one of said systems being short circuited at the far end and the other being left open circuited at the far end, and means for building up on said conductor systems stationary waves of the same amplitude but with a mutual phase displacement of 90.

3. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein there are two simple parallel straight wires run closely adjacent to one another, one being directly earthed at the far end and the other being left open at the far end.

conductor system comprises two similar wires so arranged as, in plan view, to lie along the outline of a diamond shape.

6. A system as claimed in claim 2 wherein each conductor system comprises two straight, closely adjacent parallel wires provided with suitably spaced short transverse radiators, those connected to one wire projecting to one side and those connected to the other projecting to the other, each radiator connected to one wire beingopposite and in the same straight line with one connected to the other.

7. An aerial system comprising a pair of parallel straight wires closely adjacent one another, whereby said wires are tightly radiation coupled, means connected to one end of said wires for energizing said wires with stationary waves of the same amplitude but with a mutual phase displacement of 90", one of said wires being earthed at its other end.

8. An aerial system comprising a pair of parallel wires arranged in a vertical half diamond, said wires being closely adjacent one another, whereby said wires are tightly radiation coupled, means connected to one end of said wires for energizing said wires with stationary waves of the same amplitude but with a mutual phase displacement of 90, one of said wires being earthed at its other end.

9. An aerial system comprising a pair of conductor systems arranged in a horizontal plane with their ends adjacent and their mid points separated, whereby a rhombic plan is formed, each of said conductor systems comprising a pair of closely adjacent parallel wires, means connected to one end of said wires for energizing the wires of each conductor system with stationary waves of the same amplitude, the energy in one wire of each conductor system having a phase displacement of 90 from the energy in the other wire, one wire of one conductor system being connected to a wire of the other system carrying energy of the same phase.

10. An aerial system comprising a pair of conductor systems arranged in a horizontal plane with their ends adjacent and their mid points separated, whereby a horizontal diamond antenna is formed, each of said conductor systems comprising a pair of soclosely adjacent parallel wires that said wires are tightly radiation coupled, means connected to one end of said wires for energizing the wires of each conductor system with stationary waves of the same amplitude, the energy in one wire of each conductor system having a phase displacement of 90 from the energy in the other wire, one wire of one conductor system being connected to a wire of the other system carrying energy of the same phase.

OTTO BOHM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2494198 *Apr 24, 1946Jan 10, 1950Hartford Nat Bank & Trust CoAntenna system
US2531432 *Oct 1, 1948Nov 28, 1950Fed Telecomm Lab IncBroad band antenna system
US2541021 *Jun 4, 1945Feb 13, 1951Standard Telephones Cables LtdAntenna
US2700733 *Mar 6, 1951Jan 25, 1955Helmut BrueckmannNonresonant antenna
US2758300 *Aug 25, 1951Aug 7, 1956Dylewski Thaddeus JRadio antenna
US2920322 *Aug 28, 1956Jan 5, 1960Brown Jr Burton PAntenna system
US3019438 *Mar 18, 1957Jan 30, 1962Gen ElectricAntenna structure
US4667204 *Apr 8, 1985May 19, 1987Hedrick James DCombination dual rhombic and V-type antenna for VHF-UHF television receivers
US5657030 *Jun 5, 1995Aug 12, 1997Peck; William H.Collapsible single or multielement rhombic antennas
WO2007027527A2Aug 25, 2006Mar 8, 2007Celgene CorpIsoindole-imide compounds and compositions comprising and methods of using the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/733, 343/811, 343/737, 343/736
International ClassificationH01Q11/06, H01Q11/04
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q11/04, H01Q11/06
European ClassificationH01Q11/06, H01Q11/04