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Publication numberUS2208050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1940
Filing dateJun 10, 1937
Priority dateJun 10, 1937
Publication numberUS 2208050 A, US 2208050A, US-A-2208050, US2208050 A, US2208050A
InventorsPasinski Walter J
Original AssigneeBurroughs Adding Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cash register
US 2208050 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

6, 1940. w. 4;. PASINSKI 2,268,050

CASH REGISTER- Filtidune 10,1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR lMa'ller J Basinski ATTORNEYS y 6, 1940. w. .1. PASINSKI 2,208,050

CASH REGISTER Filed-June 10, 193'! a Sheets-Sheet 2 3 myENToR Wll'er J. Resins/11 ATTORNEYS y 6, 1940. w. J. PASINSKI 2,208,050

CASH REGISTER Filed June 10, 1937 3 Shoots-Shoot 3 Fig. 4.

. INVENTOR M Alter J Psmsla ATTORNEYS Patented July 16, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CASH REGISTER Application June 10,1937, Serial N0. 14'l,43i

laims.

This invention relates to cash registers. It is concerned with the printing mechanism of such machines and is primarily directed to an improved and simplified construction for preventing rebound of the printing hammer mechanism.

The printing mechanism of cash registers and calculating machines ordinarily includes a printing hammer that is cooked and fired to make printing impressions. Normally, this hammer is some distance away from the paper so as to enable the paper to be line spaced, or. otherwise moved or removed without interference from the printing hammer. when the hammer is fired, it moves past its normal position to a printin position, from which it is immediately returned. In this operation there is a strong tendency for the hammer to rock or rebound so as to restrike the type with a resulting double print or smudge that is undesirable. The present invention is directed to overcoming this difliculty.

The object of the invention is to provide an improved printing mechanism for cash registers with a very simple and effective means for preventing rebound of the printing hammer.

Other and further objects of the invention will become apparent hereinafter by reference to the annexed specification and drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a right side sectional elevation of a cash register showing the printing hammer and its associated mechanism;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of the printing hammer mechanism associated with the printing wheels of the machine;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged left side elevational view of some of the essential elements of the printing hammer mechanism;

Fig. 4 is a portion of a paper strip illustrating samples of the work for both item and total printing;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary detail section of the printing hammer mechanism with the printing hammer in raised position during the item printing operation; and

Fig. 6 is an enlarged right side elevational view of the printing wheels and the printing hammer showing the several positions of the printing hammer including printing, normal and raised for item printing and raised for total printing operations.

The invention is shown applied to a Burroughs cash register of the type illustrated in Pasinski No. 2,070,059, February 9, 1937, with a printing mechanism of the type disclosed in my copending applications Serial Nos. 147,429 and 147,430, both filed June 10, 1937. The general features of the cash register will be described only very briefly, as it is not necessary to understand all the details of the machine in order to understand the present invention. Likewise, the general features of the printing mechanism will be described-only suiliciently to enable the present invention to be understood, the several novel features of said printing mechanism being the subject matter of said copending applications.

The various mechanisms of the machine are housed within a casing l0 (Fig. 1) having an indicator housing I! at its top. The machine is operated in item-entering operations by amount keys ll (Fig. 1) mounted on the ends of key levers ll pivoted on a shaft 39. The rear ends of the key levers have upward extensions ll providedwith differential slots II that control the indexing of the indicator and registering mechanisms which have not been shown, these parts and their manner of operation being explained in detail in said Pasinski patent.

The printing mechanism includes a plurality of type-carrying members in the form of type wheels I9 rotatably mounted on a shaft l9, as best shown in Fig. 2. The three lower order type wheels are used for item printing and will be called item type wheels for purposes of convenience in description. The four higher order type wheels are used in printing totals and these will be called "extra type wheels. When the v wheels are in normal position as shown in g. 2, the item type wheels have their "0's at the printing line while the extra type wheels have blank spaces at said printing line. The item type wheels only are indexed by the item keys during item-printing operations, but all the type wheels are indexed under the control of the registering mechanism in total taking, as described in said copending application Serial No.

Printing occurs on a paper strip P (Figs. 1 and 5)- which passes from a paper supply roll 10 (Fig. 5), under a shaft I6, about a stationary shaft H, over a stationary paper table 12, and

over a stationary shaft 13 to a storage roll H. The supply and storage rolls are carried by a pair of bell cranks l5 and 16 (Fig. 5), pivoted on a shaft ll carried by the side plates ll of the paper section. Normally, these rolls'occupy the position shown in Fig. 1, but, when the machine is operated, either in item entering or in total taking, the rolls are rocked counterclockwise in Fig. 1, to slide the paper strip P over the table 12 and the guides" and 73 from a position where the last entry is visible to a printing position, a line-spacing operation occurring automatically under the control of the pawl 18 (Fig. 1). As

the machine operation is completed, the rolls are returned clockwise to normal to bring the currently printed figure to a visible position. The mechanism for moving the paper is as follows:

The rear upwardly extending ends II of the amount key levers II are positioned immediately behind a universal bail ll carried by arms H m rocked forward. Positioned in front of said uni versal bail are a pair of arms 31 and 38 carrying a bail 36, the arm 31 being best shown in Fig. 3. The arms 31 and 38, together with the ball 36 are urged clockwise to normal by a spring 42 (Fig. 1) attached at one end to a stud 43 on the arm 38 and at its other end to a stud M on a stationary cross shaft 46. The ball 36 is positioned in a slot 80 in an operating arm 6! pivoted on a stud 82 carried by one of the side plates of the machine. The arm 8| has a cam slot 83 cooperating with a roller stud B4 on the bell crank Hi. When an amount key is depressed and the universal bail M moved forward, the bafl 36 is moved forward also. As the bail 26 moves forward, it rocks the arm 8| clockwise and the latter, in turn, rocks the bell cranks I5 and 16 counterclockwise to move the paper strip P to printing position. When the item key is'released, the bail 86 is returned to normal by the springs 42, and the arm 8! is rocked counterclockwise to restore the bell cranks l5 and 18, together with the storage and supply rolls and the paper strip, to normal. The papersupporting and moving mechanism comprises a detachable unit carried by the side plates I! which are detachably hooked over the shaft l9 (Fig. 1). This unit is described in more detail in said copending application Serial No. 147,430.

For the purpose of taking totals, a total-taking lever 55 has been provided (Fig. 1). This lever is pivoted at 56 and, when it is pulled forward. the connection between the amount keys and the registering mechanism is disabled and all the type wheels are indexedunder the control of said registering mechanism, as disclosed in said copending application Serial No. 147,429. Movement of the total-taking lever also shifts the paper strip through connections as follows:

Pivoted to the total lever 58 (Fig. 1) is a link 51 having a slot 59 in its rear end in which is positioned a stud 60 on the arm 31 (Fig. 3). This slot is of such a length that it does not interfere with the forward movement of the arm 31 when the latter is moved by depression of an amount key. When the total-taking lever is pulled forward (Fig. 1), the link 5'! is pulled forward with it and said link, acting on the stud 56.

' ply and storage rolls will be moved as heretofore explained and the paper will be shifted from visible to printing position and return.

Printing impressions are made on the paper strip P by the action of a printing hammer l8 (Fig. 1) having a platen face 22, which hammer is driven into engagement with the paper strip,

' whereupon the latter is driven against a ribbon R that, in turn, contacts the type faces of the indexed type wheels Is. The ribbon R is carried by a frame 90 detachably hooked over a shaft 9| carried by the side plates of the machine. The

frame supports ribbon spools 92 and 93, and the ribbon is moved step by step by a lever 64 (Fig. 1). a suitable ribbon reverse being provided. The

' ribbon mounting and operation are described in more detail in said copending application Serial The printing hammer mechanism, with which the present invention is more particularly concerned, is illustrated in its normal, inactive position in Fig. 1, said position being also shown in the dot-dash position of Fig. 6 marked normal. It comprises the printing hammer l8 which is in the form of a bail carried by supporting arms ll pivoted at It to the side plates ll of the paper section. The platen face 22 is preferably made of rubber and it extends across all of the type wheels, said platen hammer being positioned to strike the type wheels along a line which is called the printing line. The right hammer arm it has an upwardly extending portion 24 (Fig. 2) at its rearward and carrying a stud 28 to which one end of a spring M is connected. The other end of spring 2| is connected under tension to a stud 21 on the side plate E1. The tension of the spring 2i is such that the face 22 of the hammer is maintained a slight distance above the type faces 23 of the printing wheel I! when in normal or inactive position.

The printing hammer is cocked by tensioning the spring 2| and this is accomplished by the forward movement of the ball 36 (Figs. 1 and 5), which bail is moved forward, as previously explained, during each operation of the machine, no matter whether it is an item-entering or a totaling operation. The right-hand arm H of the hammer ball has a downwardly and rearwardly extending finger 28 (Fig. 1), from the side of which a square stud 26 projects into position to be engaged by the notched end I! of an arm 32 pivoted on the bail 26 and urged clockwise bya spring 32 against a limit stud 34 (Fig. 1) on one of the side plates H of the paper section.

In item-entering operations, depression of one of the amount keys rocks the corresponding key lever H counterclockwise, which moves the ball ll forward and the latter, in turn, moves the ball 36 forward. The arm 32 is thereby moved forward so that its notched end engages stud 29 of the flngei--28 of the right hammer arm I. As the depression of the key II is continued, the arm lever 32 is moved farther forward to move the finger portion 28 of the hammer forward and clockwise. This causes the hammer arms II and the hammer l8 V to be rocked clockwise about pivot l6 which raises-the hammer ll away from the printing wheels is. Simultaneously the stud 26 is moved to a greater distance away from the stud 21 and tensions the spring-.2! to a greater extent and causes the spring 2| to extend in a more nearly vertical position from that illustrated in Fig. -1 to that in Fig. 5. As the hammer l8 approaches its raised position as shown in Fig. 5, and as shown in. dot-dash lines marked Item entering in Fig. 6, the stud II of the rearwardly extending arm 33, of the side plate I! moves into a cam slot formed by a hooked portion 35 on the arm 32, which causes the arm to be rocked counterclockwise to disengage its notched end 3| from the stud 29.

Upon said disengagement, the hammer I8 is released from its raised position and it descends in a counterclockwise direction under the urge of spring 2| toward the paper strip P. As the printing hammer I 8 descends counterclockwise to printing position, its momentum is such that it continues to move beyond or through its normal Fig. 1 position against the urge of the spring 2| to printing position until its rubber contact portion 22 engages the paper P which lies between the ribbon R and the type faces 23, and said hammer forces the paper against the type faces with a sharp hammer-like blow or impact. After aaoaoso .the paper, which would cause double printing and smudging. Means has been provided to prevent this but, before describing it, the operation of the printing hammer in total taking will be explained.

In total printing, the forward movement of the total lever rocks the bail 36 forward as in\ item-printing operations, and the printing ham mer is cocked as heretofore explained. However, in total printing, provision has been made for operating the hammer with greater force because, in this operation, the platen strikes the .type faces of all seven type wheels, whereas, in item printing, only the type faces of the three item type wheels are struck. The diil'erent imi pressions are shown on the sample of work illustrated in Fig. 4. In order that the printing force per unit area of each type may be the same in both item and total printing, the hammer must .be fired with a greater force in total printing than in item printing.

Referring to Fig. 1, the total lever 55 is provided with a forwardly extending finger 63 which, when the total lever is rocked forward. engages an arm 65 of a three-armed lever 64 pivoted on the shaft Hi. This three-armed lever is shown most clearly in Figs. 2, 3 and 6, the lever being viewed from the opposite side in Figs. 2 and 3 from what it is in Figs. 1, 4, and 6. The threearmed lever 64 has an upwardly extending arm 66 positioned to engage a stud 68 on one of the arms ll of the printing hammer bail it. The third arm 61 carries a stud 69 to which is attached the spring whose other end is attached to a stud H on one of the plates I! of the paper section. The spring 10 maintains the threearmed lever in its normal position with the arm 66 engaging the stud 88.

As the total-taking lever 55 is moved forward, the bail 36 is moved forward and the arm 32 cooks the printing hammer as previously explained. However, before the arm 32 is disengaged from the stud 29 to release the hammer, the projection 63 on the total lever 55 engages the arm 65 of the three-armed lever 64 and rocks it clockwise as viewed in Figs. 1, 5 and 6, which would be counterclockwise in Figs. 2 and 3. The threearmed member 64, engaging the stud 68, picks up the printing hammer and rocks it farther clockwise to the dot-dash position marked Totaling in Fig. 6. As the printing hammer reaches this position, the projection 63 passes oil the arm 85, thereby releasing the printing hammer which is fired to printing position with an increased force as against the force with which it is fired in itementering operations.

In both item and total-printing operations, the printing hammer l8 moves quickly to printing position to give printing impressions by impact printing as distinguished from pressure or squeeze operations, after which it is pulled backward a slight distance toward its normal position. The momentum of the hammer tends to make it rebound to cause double printing or smudging and the present invention provides a very simple and effective means to overcome this for both item and total printing, even though the force of printing impression is different in the two cases.

Located at the forward side of the spring 2| intermediate its ends and adapted to engage the same is a stud 50 carried by the right side plate II. This stud 50' is so positioned in relation to the spring 2| as to engage the spring II on its forward side when the hammer II in its descent to printing position is at approximately its normal Fig. 1 position, 'i. e. with the hammer face slightly removed from the type faces; This stud 50 affects the spring action in the following manner to prevent rebound of the hammer.

As the printing hammer it moves counterclockwise toward printing position from its cocked 'of the spring 2| acts as a dampener or snubber because the angular swing of the spring 2i is .restricted by its engagement with the stud It.

That is,.placing the stud in the path of the spring increases the distance the spring must stretch between its two ends which are secured to the studs 50 and 26 and thereby increases the tension of the spring over what it would be without the stud during the final portion of hammer movement. The hammer by this time, however, has attained sufficient momentum during its counterclockwise descent so as to continue the remaining distance, against the now clockwise urge of the spring 2i, to the type wheels and to strike the same with sumcient force. After the printing blow has been struck, the hammer I8 is pulled .upwardly to normal position by the spring particularlybecause of the increased tension of the spring caused by the stud 50.

As the hammer moves upward, it tends to move past its normal position and any movement upward past normal tends to tension the spring 21. When the momentum of the hammer in the upward direction has been overcome, the tension of the spring tends to again move the hammer downward toward the type wheels, the force being, of course, less than during the initial descent because the spring 2| has not been cooked to any great extent. But any movement of the hammer past its normal position must be against the short portion of the spring between the stud 50 and the stud 28, and the tensioning of this portion. of the spring requires considerably more force than if the long spring simply had to be tensioned a small amount. Consequently, the tendency of the hammer to move past normal position toward printing position is resisted to an extent such that double printing or smudging is prevented and the hammer is quickly brought to normal position without any substantial rebound.

Although the foregoing description has set forth one form of printing mechanism, it will be understood that changes and modifications may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a machine of the class described comprisinga plurality oi printing members, a movable printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted when tensioned to urge said printing hammer toward said printing members, means for moving said hammer away from said printing members to tension said spring, -means for releasing said latter means to permit the hammer to move under urge of said spring toward said printing members and to strike said printing members, and means for resisting rebound movements of said hammer to prevent said hammer from restriking said printing members.

2. In a machine of the class described comprising a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted when tensioned to urge said printing hammer toward said printing members, means for rocking said hammer away from said printing members to tension said spring, means for releasing said latter means to permit the hammer to rock under urge of. said spring toward said printing members and to strike said printing members, and means acting upon said spring to resist rebound movements of said hammer to prevent the latter from restriking said printing members.

3. In a machine of the class described compris ing a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted when tensioned to urge said printing hammer toward said printing members, means for rocking said hammer away from said printing members to tension said spring, means for: releasing said latter means to permit the hammer to rock under urge of said spring toward said printing members and to strike said printing members, and means cooperating with said spring to increase its effect upon said printing hammer to resist rebound movements of said hammer to prevent the latter from restriking said printing members.

4. In a machine of the class described comprising a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted to maintain said hammer in normal position with respect to said printing members, means for rocking said hammer from normal position in a direction away from said printing members, means for releasing said latter means to permit said hammer to be rocked by said spring toward said printing members to printing position and to strike said printing members, and means adapted to engage said spring member intermediate its ends to increase the tension of said spring when said hammer is rocked to printing position, the increase in said tension being efiective to retract said hammer from printing position and to prevent said hammer from restriking said printing members.

5. In a machine of the class described comprising a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said 1 iii members beyond normal position to printing position and to strike said printing members, and means adapted to engage said spring member intermediate its ends to increase the tension of said spring when said hammer is rocked from normal to printing position, said increased tension being effective to retract said hammer from printing to normal position and to prevent said hammer from restriking said printing members.

6. In a machine of the class described comprising a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted to maintain said hammer in normal position with respect to said printing members and to Oppose rocking movements of said hammer from normal position, means for rocking said hammer from normal position in a direction away from said printing members, means for releasing said latter means to permit said hammer to be rocked by said spring toward said printing members and beyond normal position to printing position to strike said printing members, and deflecting means adapted to engage said spring intermediate its ends to increase the tension of. said spring member when said hammer is rocked from normal to printing position, said increased tension being effective to return said hammer from printing to normal position and to prevent said hammer from restriking said printing members.

7. In a machine of the class described comprising a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted to maintain said hammer in normal position with respect to said printing members and to oppose rocking movements 01 said hammer from normal position, means for rocking said hammer from normal position in a direction away from said printing members, means for releasing said latter means to permit said hammer to be rocked by said spring toward said printing members and beyond normal position to printing position to strike said printing members, and a fixed stud adapted to be engaged by said spring intermediate the ends of said spring when said hammer is rocked from normal to printing position by said spring so as to prevent said hammer from restriking said printing members.

8. In a machine of the class described comprising a plurality of printing members, a pivotally supported printing hammer adapted to strike said printing members, a spring adapted to maintain said hammer in normal position with respect to said printing members and to oppose rocking movements of said hammer from normal position, means for rocking said hammer from normal position in a direction away from said printing members to tension said spring, means for releasing said latter means to permit said hammer to be rocked by said spring member toward said printing members and beyond normal position to printing position to strike said printing members, and a stud positioned to engage the side of said spring intermediate its ends and deflect said spring when said hammer is rocked from normal to printing position, said spring when deflected being adapted to retract said hammer from printing to normal position to prevent said hammer from restriking said printing members.

WALTER. J. PASINSKI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2501447 *Apr 3, 1945Mar 21, 1950by mesne assignmentsCalculating machine fractional
US2625100 *Jul 24, 1947Jan 13, 1953Ncr CoPrinting hammer rebound preventing means
US2708498 *Nov 3, 1948May 17, 1955Ncr CoSensing device for record material
US3330397 *Jul 12, 1965Jul 11, 1967Alan RadcliffSelective device which prints on pressure sensitive paper
US5313881 *Jan 6, 1993May 24, 1994Morgan William TCompact disc marking apparatus
US5375515 *Nov 22, 1993Dec 27, 1994Morgan; William T.Compact disc marking apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/93.36, 235/60.00P
International ClassificationB41J9/42, B41J9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41J9/42
European ClassificationB41J9/42