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Publication numberUS2210030 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1940
Filing dateMar 5, 1935
Priority dateMar 5, 1935
Publication numberUS 2210030 A, US 2210030A, US-A-2210030, US2210030 A, US2210030A
InventorsEllis Philip B
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction cleaner
US 2210030 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 6,1940. I P. B. ELLIS Q 2.210,030

SUCTION CLEANER Original Filed l larch 5, 1935 2 'sheets sheet l FIG- 1- INVENTORI 195W flf e- Aug. 6, 1940. P. s. ELLIS 2210,030

suc'rrori GLEANER Original Filed March 5,, 1935 2 Sh'ee'ts-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Patented Aug. 6, 1940 PATENT OFFICE SUCTION CLEANER Philip B. Ellis, Itidley Park, Pa., assignor to Electrolux Corporation, Dover, Del., 2. corporation of Delaware Application March 5, 1935, Serial No. 9,360 Renewed December 1'7, 1937 12 Claims.

My invention relates to suction cleaning apparatus and particularly to nozzle structures therefor and it has for an object to provide an improved structure of this kind.

A further object of my invention is to provide an improved nozzle which will effectivelyagitate the nap of an article being cleaned for dislodging dust therein and which will gather the nap into an advantageous position for removing the dust m by the sweeping action of a body of air.

A still further object of my invention is to provide an improved nozzle structure which will always remain in an effective position when reciprocated across an article being cleaned without requiring the operator to be highly skilled in its use.

These and other objects are effected by my invention, as will be apparent from the follow-' ing description and claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, in which:

Fig. 1 is a view showing my improved nozzle applied to a suction cleaner of conventional design;

Fig. 2 is a bottom view of the nozzle;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the nozzle;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line IVIV of Figs. 2 or 3;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken along the line V--V of Fig. 4;

Fig; 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line VI-VI of Fig. 8.

Fig. 7 is a front elevation of Fig. VI;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged bottom view of a portion of the nozzle shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view taken along the line. IXIX of Fig. 2;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged view of a detail of Fig. 7 and showing the nap of a carpet being combed and gathered by my improved nozzle; and,

Fig. 11 is a view illustrating a modification of a detail of my improved nozzle.

Referring now, particularly, to Fig. 1, my improved nozzle structure indicated generally by 45 the numeral I0, is shown applied to a conventional portable cleaner which may include a blower unit II, a flexible conduit l2 and a rigid conduit or handle I3 for pivotal connection at ll, to the nozzle Ill. The apparatus illustrated operates in a well-known manner in that air, laden with the dirt removed from the article being cleaned such as, for example, a carpet, is drawn through the nozzle l0 and conduits l3 and I2 by the blower unit I l in which separation of the dirt from the air is efiected before the latter is returned to the ambient atmosphere. The nozzle may be moved over the surface of the carpet by the operator by means of the rigid conduit or handle l3. It will be apparent that the nozzle I0 will always be maintained in engagement with the carpet over its entire surface, regardless of the elevation of the operator's hand or the angularity between the conduit I3 and the carpet, due to the provision of the-pivotal con- 10 nection M. The pivotal connection M permits the handle l3 to be. lowered without disturbing the engagement of the nozzle with the carpet and, therefore, the nozzle may be admitted beneath furniture or other objects where low head 15 room is encountered.

Reference will now be had to Figs. 2 to 8, inclusive, in which my improved nozzle is shown in detail. It includes a relatively flat body portion I5, having edges l6 and I! which are, alter- 20 nately, leading and trailing edges as the nozzle is reciprocated over a fioor or other surface to be cleaned. The sides of the nozzle are preferably rounded or ,ovalled as shown at IS. The periphery of the nozzle may be-provided with a 5 soft protecting member I9 such as, for example, a rubber strip, for preventing the metallic nozzle from marring furniture or the like. V

A' relatively flat surface 2| is provided on the bottom of the nozzle,-which surface 2| engages the carpet or article to be cleaned. The nozzle further includes an elongated air outlet passage 22 adjacent the center thereof, which passage extends from the surface 2| through the nozzle and communicates with the rigid conduit l3 through the pivotal connection l4.

As shown in Figs.'4 and 5, the pivotal connec- I tion ll embodies an angularly displaceable fitting 23, into one end of which, as at'24, the conduit or handle I3 is readily insertable. The fitting 23 is I provided with transversely-extending hollow trunnions 25, which are preferably closed at their ends andwhich may be journalledin the body I5 in any convenient manner. This journalled connection may include a sleeve 26 secured, for example, by means of clips 21, to the body I5. The fitting 23 has an opening 28 formed in e bottom thereof which registers with an opening 29 formed in the sleeve 26, these openings 28 and 29 providing communication at all times between the air discharge passage 22 and the interior of the fitting '23. The upper side of the sleeve 26 is cut away at 3|, (Fig. 3) to'provide clearance for the end portion 24 of the fitting 23 as the latter is angularly moved in the sleeve. It will be apparent from the foregoing that the 55 throttling of the passages.

' latter.

Disposed about and spaced from the elongated air outlet passage 22 is a series of air inlet passages 20 providing communication between the atmosphere and the surface 2| adjacent .the article being cleaned. Each of the air inlet passages 20 is preferably provided, at its lower end, with a whirl chamber 32 and, as shown in Fig. 2, the inlet passages are" preferably of smaller diameter near the center of the nozzle than near the ends. The lower end of each passage 23 preferably projects into its whirl chamber, terminating in spaced relation with respect to the surface 2|. This latter feature is best shown in Fig. 5. The whirl chambers 32 are connected to the air discharge passage 22 by means of ducts or grooves 34 which conduct the air taken in through the passages 20 to the discharge passage 22 as hereinafter described.

The surface 2| of the nozzle is provided with a plurality of serrated grooves 35 extending between the edges l6 and II or in the normal direction of movement of the nozzle as it is reciprocated across a fabric to be cleaned. As shown in Fig. 8, these grooves 35 preferably become progressively wider as they approach the edges 96 and H. Thegrooves 35 formteeth 35' which.

are efiective to comb the fabrlcso as to facilitate removal of dirt therefrom. At the same time, the grooves 35 facilitate movement of the nozzle over the surface to be cleaned.

While the surface 2! may be made flat over its entirety, I prefer. as indicated at 36, in Fig. 6, to curve or bevel it upwardly adjacent the edges i and ii so as to facilitate movement of the nozzle and the combingprocess incident thereto. With respect to the depths of the grooves 35, these preferably decrease in depth from the edges it and il inwardly to a boundary line d5 shown in Fig. 2. Within the boundary line.

it, the grooves are reiait-ively shallow and of uniform depth.

Adjacent the edges it l 'wf the nozzle and outside of the boundary iine iii, I provide a group of serrated grooves- ;i'i extending trans-' verseiy of the grooves 35 and intersecting the The depth of the grooves 31, like the grooves 35, preferably decreases in depth in a direction from the edges l6 and I1 inwardly to the boundary 45, the depths of the transverse grooves 31 being substantially the same as the depths of the grooves 35 at their points of intersection. The crossed grooves 35 and 31 provide a multiplicity of checkered projections 38 stantially of the same depth as the grooves .which they intersect.

They define, with the grooves 35, a group of checkered projections 4| adjacent the air discharge opening 22, The

area intervening between the outer boundary line 45 and the inner boundary line 46 is, what 1 term, a sealing area "which area, as will be apparent from Fig. 2, extends outwardly of the whirl chambers 32 and, as it embodies only shallow grooves extending in a single direction only,

provides a sealing surface about the whirl cham- I Operation v The nozzle 'lO-is reciprocated across the carpet or other material to be cleaned by means of the handle I 3 in a well-known manner. As the nozzle moves forwardly or backwardly, the nap of the carpet is agitated or combed by the projections 33 whereby the nap of the carpet is separated and the dust and dirt contained therein is exposed to the down-draft of air circulating at high velocity through the inlet passages 20. This air dislodges the dust and dirt and carries the same from the whirl chambers through the ducts 34 to the air discharge opening 22 for removaito the unit During movement of the nozzle III, the checkered projections 33 and 4| are both effective to agitate the surface of the nap and dislodge hair or other stringy material from the surface so as to facilitate the removal of such material.

In Fig. 11 I show another embodiment of invention which is similar to the embodiment previously described except that ducts or grooves are arranged tangentially with respect to their associated whirl chambers 32. l

While I have shown my improved nozzle as applied to a type of suction cleaner wherein the nozzle is movable relative to the blower unit, it is to be understood that my invention is equally applicable to other types of suction cleaners.

While I have shown myinvention in several forms, it will be obvious to thoseskilled in-the art that it is not so limited, but is susceptible of various other changes and modifications, without departing from the spirit thereof, and I desire, therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereupon as are imposed by the prior.

art or are specifically set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim is: I

1. A surface engaging inlet fitting for a suction cleaner having a bottom face for direct gravitational engagement with a'surface to be cleaned, air outlet means embodied in the fitting and including an opening located in an intermediate portion of said engaging face, and a series of passageways extending downwardly through the fittingfor directing air against the surface to be cleaned, said passageways communicating at their lower ends with said outlet ineans and said passageways being spaced from the perimeter of the engaging face so that the portion of the engaging face located outwardly of the passageways cooperates with thesurface to be cleaned to retard flow, of air inwardly under the engaging face of,the fitting.

2. A surfaceengaging inlet fitting for a sucaz opao the surface to be cleaned, an elongated outlet located in an intermediate portion of said engaging face, three or more openings extending vertically through the fitting, said openings being spaced fromeach other-and from the elongated outlet, and passages provided in said engaging" face for affording communication between the elongated outlet and the lower ends of the respective openings.

-3. A surface-engaging inlet fitting for a suction cleaner having a bottom face for engaging the surface-to be cleaned, outlet means located in an intermediate portion of said engaging face,

and a plurality of separate passages :extending v through the fitting to the engaging face and through the fitting to the engaging. face, said passages being spaced from and located on opposite sides of said elongated outlet, and a plurality of ducts diverging from each ofsaid passages and communicating with said elongated outlet.

5. A surface engaging inlet fitting for a suction'cleaner having an elongated bottom face for engagement with carpets and the like to be cleaned, outlet means located in an iiitermediate portion of said bottom face, projections provided on said bottom face for separating the.

nap of the carpet, and aplurality of passageways extending through the fitting to the bottom face and communicating with said outlet means for carpet. v p a 6. A surface engaging inlet fitting as claimed in claim wherein the projections embodytreth extending in a transverse direction with respect to the major axis of the bottom face.

7. A surface-engaging inlet fitting for a suction cleaner having 5 bottom face for engaging circulatingair through theseparated nap of the v the surface to be cleaned, an elongated [outlet located in an intermediate portion of said engaging face, a series .-of openings extending through the flttingforconveying air from the atmosphere to the engaging face, means embodied in the engaging face at the ends of the respective-openings forreceiving air deflected from the surface-to be cleaned, said-latter means being located on the sides of the elongated outlet and in spaced relation with respect to both I the outlet and the perimeter of the engaging face, and ducts connecting said air receiving means and said elongated outlet.

8. A surface-engaging inlet fitting for a suction cleaner having a. bottom face for engaging a surface to be cleaned, an elongated outlet lo cated in an intermediate portion of said engaging face, a series of openings disposedinspaced relation with respect to each other about the outlet for conveying air from the atmosphere in a down-draft direction against the surface to be cleaned, said openings communicating with the engaging face intermediate of the outlet and the perimeter of the engaging face arid said open-- ings being located opposite the sides .of said elongated outlet, means connecting each openprovided in the engaging face and extending between said outlet and the perimeter of the fitting.

9. A nozzle adapted for reciprocation across an article to be cleaned and embodying a substantially flat surface for engagement with the article, an elongated air discharge passage. arranged adjacent the centeryof' the nozzle. and extending from said surface through the nozzle, a plurality of air inlet openings spaced outwardly from said passage and extending from the surface through the nozzle for impinging air=against thesurface to be cleaned, a plurality ofgrooves formed in the surface connecting said air inlet openings with the air discharge passage, a plurality ofshallow serations in said surface extending generally in the direction of normal movement of the nozzle and a plurality of transversely-extending serrations intersecting said first-mentioned serrations and formed in at least a part of said surface, whereby a plurality ofcheckered projections are defined in at least a partof said;

10. A nozzle structure for suction cleaners adapted for reciprocation across an article to be cleaned and embodying a substantially flat surface for engagement with thearticle, at! elongated air discharge passage arranged adjacent the center of the nozzle and extending from said surface through the noule, a plurality of air inlet openings spaced outwardly from said passage and extending from the surface through the nozzle, a plurality of grooves formed in the surface connecting said air inlet openings with the air discharge passage, a plurality of shallow serrations in said surface extendinggenerally in the direction of normal movement of the cleaned and embodying an elongated surface for engagement with the article, said surface being substantially flat at its inner portions and curvedupwardly 'at its leading and ,trailing edges, an elongated air discharge passage arranged adjacent the center of the nomle and extending therethrough from said surface, a plurality of air inlet openings extending through said nozzle to said surface and spaced outwardly structure for suction cleaners ing with said outlet and communicating means I nozzle and a plurality of transversely-extendins from the air discharge passage, a plurality of I grooves formed in the surface and providing communication between said air inlet openings and the air discharge passage, side entry grooves'fornied in the end portions of the elongated engaging surface for conveying air from the ends of the nozzle to the air discharge passage, a plurality of serrations in said suface extending from adjacent the leading edge of the surface to the trailing edge thereof, said serrations being shallow adjacent the center of the surface and progressively increasing in depth toward the leading and trailing edges thereof, and a plurality of transversely-extending serrations in at least a part of the surface and intersectingpthe firstmentionedserrations.

12. In a suction nozie-adapted to be moved backand forth over a surface to becleaned, a.

ing, and a plurality of narrow, straight, paralleldisposed ribs projecting downwardly from said lips and extending parallel to said direction of v movement to form narrow, shallow passages extending from the outer edges of said lips to said opening, said ribs being interrupted to provide narrow passages extending at right angles to I the first-mentioned passages.

PHILIP B ELLIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2554238 *Jun 23, 1948May 22, 1951Burri William FNozzle attachment for vacuum cleaners
US2556022 *May 14, 1947Jun 5, 1951Amen AtiyehVacuum cleaner nozzle with variable suction control
US2799040 *Aug 19, 1953Jul 16, 1957Hageal NealFurniture tool for vacuum cleaners
US3179472 *Sep 6, 1961Apr 20, 1965Fuller CoPneumatic conveying apparatus
US3225379 *Jan 22, 1964Dec 28, 1965Rexair IncRug tool
US4265621 *Oct 19, 1979May 5, 1981Mcvey Kenneth ETip for dental aspirator
US6080243 *Jun 18, 1998Jun 27, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyFluid guide device having an open structure surface for attachement to a fluid transport source
US8510902Dec 3, 2008Aug 20, 2013Dri-Eaz Products, Inc.Air induction hard surface cleaning tool with an internal baffle
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/375, 15/420
International ClassificationA47L9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/02
European ClassificationA47L9/02