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Publication numberUS2210618 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1940
Filing dateSep 15, 1939
Priority dateSep 15, 1939
Publication numberUS 2210618 A, US 2210618A, US-A-2210618, US2210618 A, US2210618A
InventorsSt Cyr William H De
Original AssigneeSt Cyr William H De
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for treating the skin
US 2210618 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 6, 1940- w. H. DE s'r. CYR 2.210,618

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING THE SKIN Filed Sept. 15, 1939 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Aug 6, 194% UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR TREATING THE SKIN 5 Claims.

This invention relates to an apparatus and method for treating the skin and has for its primary object the provision of such a method and apparatus which will overcome skin dryness, refine the texture, reduce the skin lines, remove excess matter from the pores, and invigorate the skin by application of liquefied wax thereto with a minimum of discomfort to the patient from the heat.

Another object of this invention is to provide such a method and apparatus for so treating the skin with a maximum of efliciency.

Another object of this invention is to provide a method and apparatus for treating the skin with a low melting normally solid medicament and particularly with a medicament which is normally solid at temperatures above body temperature.

Other and further objects of this invention will be apparent as the same becomes better understood from an examination of the specification and claims in conjunction with the accompanying drawing wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of the heating apparatus;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged detailed fragmentary section taken at the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary section taken at the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the face and neck applicator cloth used in conjunction with the apparatus shown in Fig. 1; and

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the applicator cloth for the back of the hand for use in conjunction with the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.

The beneficial effects of wax in a liquid form upon the skin have long been known. By its application the skin is cleansed and softened and lines therein are removed. According to the practices heretofore followed, however, there have been certain difliculties attendant upon the application of wax to the skin. To produce the proper results, the wax must be in the liquid form. Since ordinary parafiin wax melts at a temperature between 128 and 140 F. and sometimes even higher, its application in molten form causes much discomfort to the patient. It is also diflicult to apply the wax to the skin in liquid form and obtain a uniform coating or application thereof. Moreover, it is desirable to maintain the liquid wax in contact with the skin for a considerable period of time. This, in turn, also offers many difliculties.

By means of my invention, these and other difficulties have been obviated. I have developed a method and apparatus by which it is possible to bring the wax or other medicament in liquid form into 'uniform contact with the skin and to maintain the same in such contact for a substantial period of time.

In the particular embodiment of my invention described herein and referring to the drawing, reference character I generally designates a heating pad for the face and neck. This pad I is shaped to fit the face by dart stitching as at 2. It has openings as at 3 and 4 for the eyes, and as at 5 for the mouth. The pad I is also provided with a suitable nose piece 6 affording a recess on its under side to fit the nose of the patient and provided with an opening 1 so that the patient may inhale and exhale through said opening. The pad fits snugly over the forehead and conforms thereto by virtue of the dart stitching 2 and conforms to the shape of the chin by virtue of dart stitching 8 and extends inwardly l to the neck line where it is attached to an extension piece 9 which goes around the neck of the patient. The pad is held in place by tapes In which tie in back of the head and neck.

The heating pad is thus shaped to conform to the contour of the surface of the skin to be treated and is maintained at all times in close association therewith.

The pad includes an outer layer ll of heavy flannel stitched at its edges l2 to an intermediate layer of cambric l3 and a layer l4 of surgical silk on the inner face of the pad. The space between the layer of cambric l3 and the heavy flannel ll contains wire heating elements, which wires are covered with the usual asbestos cov- I ering, and are distributed over the face and neck portion of the pad in predetermined arrangement as to number, spacing and resistance so as to provide a uniform heating of the surface with which the pad is brought into contact. The heating elements are also so arranged as to provide a suitable temperature, usually between F. and 140 F. and, preferably in the neighborhood of F.

Although the above arrangement of materials comprising the pad is to be preferred, any suitable pad structure which conforms closely to the contours of the surface of the skin to be treated and which provides insulation for the heating element may be used. It is, of course, highly desirable if the pad is to be reused that the inner surface be composed of an oil impervious material such as the surgical silk above mentioned.

Heating pads l5 and I6 are similar to the pad just described except as to plan configuration and certain other details which will be pointed out hereinafter and are provided for each hand of the patient for treatment to the back of each hand (but not the palms). These pads l5 and I6 are preferably in the shape of mittens, the heating side of each containing an outer layer I I of heavy flannel, an intermediate layer l3 of cambric, and an inner layer M of surgical silk. As before, the space between the flannel II and .the cambric l3 contains heating coils I! which likewise are arranged as to space, number, and heating characteristics to provide a suitable temperature preferably in the neighborhood of If desired, these pads l5 and 16 may con tain a second'layer of surgical silk, here designated as It, to form with the inside layer of surgical silk a pocket IQ for the reception of the hand 20 of the patient, the palm of the hand facing the layer l8 and the back of the hand facing the pad proper.

Any suitable or convenient electrical circuit for energizing the heating elements of the pad may be used. Thus an electrical cord 2|, provided with the usual plug 22, may be connected through main branch 23 to the head and neck pad and through branches 24 and 25 to hand pads l5 and IE to energize the heating elements of the pads. Simple switches 26, 21 and 28 are provided in the branches 24, 23 and 25, respectively, so that any one of the pads may be connected or disconnected without interfering with the operation of either or both of the other two pads.

To permit an application of the wax or other medicament in the molten form to the skin of a patient without causing extreme discomfort, it is highly desirable that the melting point of the wax be reduced. This result may be achieved by mixing with the wax another substance miscible therewith which possesses a melting point lower than that of the wax. Thus an oil which is liquid at normal temperatures may be mixed with the wax in a proportion which will produce a final composition having a desirable melting point. Any of a number of oils are suitable for this purpose. For example, mineral oil or cocoanut oil may be used.

I have found that a very satisfactory composition consists of a mixture of one pound of paraffin wax with two ounces of cocoanut oil and two ounces of mineral oil. The ingredients are melted together and thoroughly mixed, whereupon they are ready for application to the skin. This composition has a melting point of about 120 F. and may be readily used without discomfort to the patient.

The wax composition is preferably applied to the skin by means of thin white cloths 29 and 30 adapted for use with the face and hands of the patient respectively. These cloths may be of absorbent material and may be treated with the wax composition to deposit a substantially uniform layer of wax thereon. If desired, any suitable sheet material which will serve as a carrier for the wax composition may be used instead of the cloths herein shown. The wax composition is preferably applied to the cloths 29 and 30 by immersing the same in a molten or liquid bath of the composition. By such immersion the cloths will become impregnated or saturated with the composition. After immersion the cloths may be spread on a non-porous fiat surface, where they are permitted to dry and harden, after which they are ready for use.

The wax composition should have a melting point substantially above body temperature in order that the patient may obtain the beneficial effects of the treatment. However, I prefer that the composition melt below the temperature of since contact with the skin of a higher melting substance in the liquid form, if maintained for any substantial period of time, would cause great discomfort to the patient. I find that a melting point of approximately 120 is desirable, but this temperature may, of course, be varied within the range set forth.

In operation, the wax is mixed with the melting point depressing oil to produce the medicament mixture and then applied to the sheet material or cloths 29 and 30 which are used for the application. The cloths are then permitted to cool to solidify the wax composition.

When a treatment is to be given, the cloths 29 and 30, impregnated with the wax composition, are placed upon the skin of the patient, the heating pad is then superimposed over these cloths and adiusted into tightly fitting position. The next step is to raise the temperature of the pad by energizing the heating elements to cause the wax composition to liquefy. It is important that the pad shall act to uniformly raise the temperature throughout its surface. The pad may then be maintained in position at the desired temperature for from 10 to 20 minutes or any other desired period of time. The heavy fiannel used in the pad prevents loss of heat, and

the surgical silk protects the wiring from the melted wax. After the treatment, the surgical silk is easily cleaned with alcohol.

' By using my method and providing the aforesaid apparatus which is so designed as to uniformly distribute the heat over the skin to be treated and to apply such heat uniformly at the exact temperature necessary to liquefy the paraffin in the pieces 29 and 30, the danger of excess heat is avoided in any particular place and a minimum heat discomfort results.

Although I have described my improved method and apparatus in connection with the application of liquefied wax to the skin of a patient, it will be apparent that they may be readily adapted for use with other medicaments and are particularly useful in the application to the skin of low melting medicaments which are normally solid at body temperatures.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application for an im rovement in method and apparatus for treating the skin, filed Au ust 3. 1937, Serial No. 157,178.

While there are shown and described certain embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Chan es. therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed in the appended claims, in which it is intended to claim all novelty inherent in the invention as broadly as permissible. in view of the prior art.

I claim:

1. A method of treating the skin, which comprises applying to a sheet of absorbent material a low melting medicament, normally solid at body temperatures, said medicament being in the molten state, to impregnate said sheet with said medicament, cooling said sheet to solidify said medicai'nent, placing said impregnated sheet on the skin to be treated, superimposing over said sheet a heating pad shaped to conform to the contours of the surface of the skin, to liquefy said medicament.

2. A skin treating medicament of the character described, which comprises a mixture of approximately paraffin wax with approximately 10% of cocoanut oil and 10% of mineral oil.

3. A method of treating the skin, which comprises impregnating a sheet of absorbent material with a, molten medicament comprising wax mixed with oil in a proportion suitable to produce a composition melting between F. and F., cooling said sheet to a temperature below 120 F. to solidify said medicament, placing said sheet on the skin to be treated, said sheet being substantially co-extensive with the surface of the skin to be treated, superimposing over said sheet a heating pad adapted to conform to the contours of the surface of the skin, and heating said pad to liquefy said medicament.

4. A method of treating the skin, which comprises applying to a sheet of absorbent material a low melting molten medicament normally solid at body temperatures to impregnate said sheet and heating said pad with said medicament, cooling the sheet to a temperature below the melting point of said medicament to solidify the medicament, applying said impregnated sheet to the skin to be treated, placing a heating pad in contact with said sheet, and heating said pad to liquefy said medicament.

5. A method of treating the skin, which comprises heating a medicament normally solid at body temperatures to a temperature above the melting point thereof to liquefy the same, applying the molten liquefied medicament to a sheet of material, cooling said sheet to a temperature below the melting point of the medicament to solidify the medicament thereon, placing the sheet on the skin to be treated, heating the same to a temperature above the melting point of the medicament to liquefy the medicament, and maintaining said medicament in liquid form in contact with the skin for a substantial period of time.

WILLIAM H. DE ST. CYR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2718585 *Mar 26, 1953Sep 20, 1955Helmi HariuHeating pads
US2911974 *Oct 22, 1956Nov 10, 1959Spence Beatrice MTherapeutic method and apparatus
US3621191 *Apr 21, 1970Nov 16, 1971Woodrow D CornwellElectrically heated footwear and handwear
US4793352 *May 11, 1987Dec 27, 1988Eichenlaub John ELimited heat transfer device and method
US6157858 *Dec 23, 1997Dec 5, 2000Elan Pharma International LimitedDevice for the delivery of a substance to a subject and improved electrode assembly
US8613732 *Jul 27, 2012Dec 24, 2013Deanna MontroseSkin therapy systems
US20030167556 *Mar 5, 2002Sep 11, 2003Consumers Choice Systems, Inc.Methods and devices for transdermal delivery of anti-aging compounds for treatment and prevention of facial or neck skin aging
US20090093782 *Oct 5, 2007Apr 9, 2009Mady AttilaMask to compress face
US20090242539 *Apr 1, 2008Oct 1, 2009Wassel Damian AHeating System
US20130096515 *Jul 27, 2012Apr 18, 2013Deanna MontroseSkin therapy systems
WO2003075820A1 *Mar 5, 2003Sep 18, 2003Jason Enterprises, Inc.Methods and devices for transdermal delivery of anti-aging compounds for treatment and prevention of facial or neck skin aging
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/292, 219/211, 219/527, 514/772, 604/303
International ClassificationA61M35/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M35/00
European ClassificationA61M35/00