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Publication numberUS2210722 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1940
Filing dateDec 14, 1938
Priority dateDec 14, 1938
Publication numberUS 2210722 A, US 2210722A, US-A-2210722, US2210722 A, US2210722A
InventorsCharles H Klein
Original AssigneeNat Telephone Supply Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cable support
US 2210722 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 6, 1940- c. H. KLEIN 2,210,722

CABLE SUPPORT Filed Dec. 14, 1958 INVENTOR.

BY C/u zr/es 171 276191 $07 ATTO EYS.

Patented Aug- 6, 1940 7 CABLE SUPPORT Charles H. Klein, Cleveland, Ohio, assignor to The National Telephone Supp y Company,

Cleveland,- Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application December 14, 1938, Serial No. 245,685

This invention relates, as indicated, .-to cable supports, but has reference more particularly to saddles for such supports. 7

In Brenizer Patents Nos. 1,698,531 and 1,705,233, there are disclosed cable hangers provided with cable supporting saddles, which present broad areas of supporting surface for the cable. These saddles are designed to prevent cutting of the lead sheathing of the cable by the relatively sharp edges of the hanger, and are usually made of steel having a galvanized finish of aluminum.

Due, however, to the torque action which is described in my Patent No. 2,106,006, it has been found that such saddles, although they delay the cutting of the cable, do not prevent such cutting. Hangers, as disclosed in my aforesaid patent, prevent cable cutting, but are relatively expensive to manufacture, involving as they do the use of a yoke which is assembled with a ring.

The present invention, accordingly, has as its primary object the provision of a saddle which may be employed in conjunction with standard hangers of the character disclosed in the aforesaid Brenizer patents, which will prevent or substantially minimize the cutting of the cables, and which, moreover, are relatively inexpensive to manufacture.

Another object of the invention is to provide a saddle of the character described, the use of which will substantially obviate electrolytic action which is detrimental to the supported cable.

A further object of the invention is to provide a saddle which is of an electrically-insulative character.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a saddle of the character described, which is self-orienting and which is designed to facilitate the discharge therefrom of water which accumulates thereon.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

The annexed drawing and the following description set forth in detail certain mechanism embodying the invention, such disclosed meam constituting, however, but one of various me-' chanical forms in which the principle of the invention may be used.

In said annexed drawing:

Fig. 1 is a transverse section through a messenger wire provided with a hanger and a saddle embodying the invention, showing by dot and dash -lines the position of the cable upon the saddle;

Fig. 2 is a side view of the parts shown in Fig. 1;

3 is a top plan view of the parts shown in Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view, taken on the line 4| of Fig. 1; and 5 Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but showing a somewhat modified' form of saddle.

Referring more particularly to Figs. 1 to 4, inclusive, 2 designates the messenger wire, I the cable hanger, 4 the cable supporting saddle and 10 5 the cable.

The hanger 2.is in the form of suitable wire, preferably galvanized, and includes a cable receiving loop 6 having a bottom portion 1 and upwardly extending side portions 8.

The upper end portions of the side portions 2 of the loop are connected to the messenger wire 2 by means of hooks l0 and II which are formed on the respective upperend portions of the side portions 8 of the hanger loop 6, and which are constructed and applied to the messenger wire 2 to connect the hanger thereto and to prevent displacement of the hanger relatively to the messenger wire.

The lower portion of the loop 6, i. e., the portion thereof which receives the saddle 4 extends transversely to the messenger wire 2 and cable 5. The side portions 8 of the loop 6 are bent forming shoulders 9 immediately above the upper ends of the side portions of the saddle l, and the side portions 8 of the hanger diverge above the shoulders 9 from the plane of the lower portion of the loop 0 to properly space the hooks II and H longitudinally of the messenger wire, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

The cable supporting saddle is generally U- shaped, as seen in Fig. 1, for the reception of the cable 5 and to conform generally to the lower portion of the hanger loop 6, and the saddle comprises a bottom portion l2 and upwardly extending side portions IS. The saddle is further provided with two laterally spaced flanges II which form a channel for the reception of the lower portion of the hanger loop 0, the term laterally," as here used, meaning the direction lengthwise of the messenger wire 2 and the cable 5. The flanges II are spaced apart a distance but slightly greater than the width of the wire from which the hanger is formed, so that the saddle is not displaceable relatively to the hanger to any appreciable extent in a direction lengthwise of the messenger wire 2.

The lower portion l2 of the saddle 4 rests upon the lower portion I of the hanger loop I, and, in order to minimize friction between the cable and the saddle as well as to facilitate drawing of the cable through the saddle, the upper surface l5 of the lower portion l2 and the inner surfaces 86 of the side portions l3 of the saddle are transversely crowned or rounded, so as to provide, in efiect, a point contact of the saddle with the cable.

The flanges It are extended downwardly at their lower central portions to provide points H, which functionas drip points to facilitate drainage of water from the saddles. These points, by

lowering the center of gravity of the saddle, en-

ables the saddle to become self-orienting in the hanger, the saddle being freely rotatable within the hanger to a slight extent.

The base of the groove in the upstanding legs of the U-shaped saddle is so formed with reference to the loop that it is spaced substantially from the loop in order that the saddle may be free to rock therein.

Of prime importance is the fact that the saddle is made from non-metallic material, preferably from thoroughly vitrified homogeneous white porcelain, the surfaces of which have been smoothly covered with a colorless glaze. Other non-metallic materials, such as glass or molded plastics may also be e ployed for the saddles. Saddles made of glaze porcelain are particularly desirable in that by their use, electrolytic action, which would be detrimental to the supported cable, is obviated. Moreover, by using such non-metallic materials, the saddles are electricaliy-insulative in character, and in actual practice, it has been found that the saddles may be used to support a non-lead sheath power cable which had to be insulated from the hangers and messenger wire.

Another advantage in using. a saddle of glazed porcelain is that the saddle is virtually selfcleaning, rain water readily washing any accumulated dust or dirt from the smooth glazed surface.

In that form of the saddle shown in Fig. 5, the surface it of the saddle is in thc iorm of an are having as its center the axis oi. support of the hanger, that is, theams of the messenger wire 2. In this way, when the messengerwire swings tinctly claim as my invention:

1. In combination, a cable hanger provided with a loop and a U-shaped saddle-within the loop, said saddle having laterally spaced flanges to provide a groove therebetween to receive said loop, said groove being slightly wider than the portion of the loop lying therein, whereby the saddle may rotate freely in the loop, the base of the groove on the legs of the saddle being substantially spaced from the loop to provide for rocking of the saddle in the loop.

2. In combination, a cable hanger provided with a loop and a U-shaped saddle within the loop, said saddle having laterally spaced flanges to provide a groove therebetween to receive said loop, said groove being slightly wider than the portion of the loop lying therein, whereby the saddle may rotate freely in the loop, the base of the groove on the legs of the saddle being substantially spaced from the loop to provide for rocking of the saddle in the loop, said saddle having a lower portion of substantial length in the form of an are having its center the axis of suspension of said hanger.

CHARLES H.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2870237 *Apr 8, 1958Jan 20, 1959Wilkins Charles LMultiple conductor service cable insulator
US2994382 *Jul 20, 1959Aug 1, 1961Jersey Prod Res CoRunning multiple pipe strings in cased wells
US7578486Mar 14, 2003Aug 25, 2009Jim TaylorDrip hose hanger
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/61, 174/160, 174/154
International ClassificationH02G7/10
Cooperative ClassificationH02G7/10
European ClassificationH02G7/10