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Publication numberUS2210806 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1940
Filing dateNov 10, 1936
Priority dateOct 9, 1935
Publication numberUS 2210806 A, US 2210806A, US-A-2210806, US2210806 A, US2210806A
InventorsPaul Etbauer Theodor
Original AssigneePaul Etbauer Theodor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Screen
US 2210806 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug- 6, 1940- T. P: ETBAUER 2,210,806

SCREEN Filed Nov. 1o, 1956v /A/VA/ an Patented Aug. 6, 1940" UNITED STATES ,PATENT GFFICE Application November 10, 1936, Serial No. 110,168 In Germany' October 9, 1935 s claims.

'I'his invention relates to an arrangement for producing plastic and stereoscopic effects from pictures and photographs of all kinds.

It has already been proposed to arrange one or more auxiliary screens of gauze-like or cloudy character, distances apart, in front of a xed screen for ,episcopic projection or, without such a screen,- for diascopic projection, whereby images are formed, which are arranged one behind the other in staggered relation like the side scenes on a stage.

For episcopic projection it has already been proposed to erect a plurality of surfaces of cardboard, cloth, linen, wood or metal, in such a manner that the projected rays fall through interstices on the white or silver-coloured imageobstructing parts, so that the rays of light which are arrested by the screen surfaces, cannot be intercepted, eitherbythe second or the third surface. The last surface may be without interstices.

A further proposal has been made, according to which vertical reflecting threads orstrips are to be arranged in front of a non-reflecting wall which is visible between the threads.

It has also been proposed to arrange a reector close behind a translucent woven fabric, so that those constituent parts of the image which are formed by the projection on the translucent fabric, are reflected from the back and are perceived through the interstices of the fabric together with the front parts, whereby a softly drawn relief-like effect is produced.

lt has also been proposed to arrange a plane Yreflector or curved reflector close behind a trans-i lucent surface, for instance a matt 'plate close to and parallel to the said surface.

According to the invention it is proposed to make vdthe image-intercepting body in the form of a composite screen made up of spaced elements, such that its translucent or reflecting elements are arranged at small distances in denite sequence next to and behind one another in such a manner that, in the'case of a transn mitted projection they supplement one another, to form a translucent projection wall or, in the case of reiiecting spaced elements, to form an uninterrupted, reflecting-image wall, when regarded from the front, whereby besides greater luminosity, a greater plastic effect is obtained, more particularly in the case of the reflecting image wall. Reflecting spaced elements may also be associated with the translucent spaced elements of the image-intercepting body at a Ishort distance therefrom. It is also possible "to arrange an uninterrupted flat or curved mirror close behind the image-intercepting body.

The spaced elements may be of any shapeor size; they may be at, curved, or formed like lenses or prisms, and the image-intercepting body can also be iiat or curved.

It can be used for all manner of purposes, niore particularly as an image screen or as a viewing appliance or as a projection reflector or be interposed in or placed in frontv of a projection apparatus or be used in television apparatus and apparatus for the radio transmission of pictures and in conjunction with a viewingmirror.

The translucent or reflecting spaced element screen may be embedded in or applied to transparent and/or light reflecting material of any kind or may be stretched in frames; it mayrbe arranged on surfaces, for instance plates, which lie close against one another or are joined together at a very small distance apart. The image-intercepting body can be made curved on the front side and/or on the rear side and the transparent material (glass and the like) can be made inclined on its front side'and/or its rear side with respect to its vertical plane. The spaced elements of the image-intercepting body can be produced by printingi etching, by blast, by engraving, stamping, embossing, casting photographic printing or in any other way. They can be arranged parallel to one another at an inclination in the depth direction or alternately inclined to one another.

Translucent pictures, such as diapositives, may` be arranged in front of, behind or between the layers of spaced elements of the image-intercepting body. They will then appear more plastic',-when viewed by transmitted light.

With the,various forms of the image-intercepting body which are described, harmonic, plastic images are obtained, which give a very realistic-effect.

The arrangement according to the invention is illustrated diagrammatically by way of example in the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagram of a spaced element arrangement as seen vfrom the front,h

Fig. 2 is a cross-section through the same arrangement of spaced elements in a solid screen part of the image-intercepting body,

Fig. 3 a cross-section through the screening part of an image-intercepting body'made up of plates and a reilecting back'wall placed close against one another,

Fig'` 4 qa cross-section through the screen part of an image-'intercepting body with small spaces y elements arranged at an inclination between the element-carrying platesand with a reflecting spaced element screen arranged uniformly behind a translucent screen,

Fig. 5 shows a cross-section through the screen part of an image-intercepting body with uniformly distributed gaps,

Fig. 6 is a cross-section through the screen part of an image-intercepting body with the spaced elements arranged at an inclination to the depth direction,

Fig. 7 shows a cross-section through the screen part of an image-intercepting body with spaced to the depth direction and to one another,

Fig. 8 -is a cross-section through the screen part of an image-intercepting body, the individual spaced elements of which are curved,

Fig. 9 is a cross-section through the screen part of an image-intercepting body, the spaced elements of which are arranged in curved rows,

Fig. 10 is a portion of the profile of an imageintercepting body, the pattern formed by the elements of the components parts of which is made in relief.

The diagrammatic'figures shown in the accompanying drawing illustrate only constructional examples, which may be modied and are by no means limited to the dimensions, angles and forms shown in the drawing and referred to in the specication.

Fig. 1 shows the spaced screen elements in their arrangement next to and behind one another, namely in four layers behind one another by way of example. The numeral 2l forms the rst, numeral 22 the second, numeral 23 the third and numeral 2t the fourth layer of the spaced element screen. Viewed from the front, they supplement one another to form a continuous projection wall. The reflecting image wall is formed by the same arrangement of transparent or non-transparent small reflectors.

Fig. 2 shows in cross-section through the screen part of an image-intercepting body the spaced elements embedded in a transparent, light-refracting material, such as glass, Cello'- phane or quartz and the like. Fig. 3 shows in cross-section the arrangement of the layers of spaced elements on plates lying close against o-ne another. The rear side of the rear-most plate is Va reflector.

Fig. 4 shows in cross-section four screen plates which are placed at asmall distance from one another and are provided in front with light- -permeable spaced elements bearing the numerals 2l, 22, 23, 2d, and behind them reflecting spaced elements bearing the numerals 25.

Fig. 5 shows ingcross-section a screen plate made in relief with evenly distributed gaps, the light-permeable layers 2l and 22 of which are accompanied atsa distance by alayer 25 of reecting elements. Fig. 6 shows in cross-section an arrangement of the spaced elements bearing the numerals 2 I, 22, 23, 24, in which they are inclined to the depth direction. Fig. 7 shows in cross-section an arrangement of the spaced elements bearing the numerals 2l, 22, 23, Ziin which they are inclined to the depth direction and to one another, at any suitable angle.

Fig. 8 shows in cross-section screen layers bearing the numerals 2|, 22, 23, 26, with curved spaced elements which are formed as small hollow bodies or hollow reilector's, but may also be inthe form of prisms placed in front of the light permeable screen layers.

Fig. 9 shows in'cross-section a curved imageintercepting body witha curved reector d at the rear side. Fig. '10 shows in cross section a -proiile part made in relief of an image-intercepting body with layers of spaced elements bearing the numerals 2|, 22, 23.

What I claim is:

1. A picture screen having a plurality of spaced image intercepting elements arranged in diierent planes, the spaces between said elements in each plane being transparent, the image intercepting elements in the rear planes being arranged behind the transparent spaces between the image intercepting elements in the front planes so that the image intercepting elements supplement one another to form a continuous gapless picture screen, and light refracting material being arranged in front of the image intercepting elements, said elements being carried by said light refracting material.

2. A` screen as claimed in claim l, in which the spaced elements are translucent.

3. A screen as claimed in claim 1, in which the spaced elements are reflecting.

4. Ascreen as claimed in claim 1, said light refracting material comprising a plurality of refracting plates arranged at small distances apart, behind which the spaced intercepting elements are placed.

5. A screen as claimed in claim 1 and having a light-permeable element at a short distance in front of each spaced element.

6. A screen as claimed in claim l, said light refracting material comprising a plurality oi refracting plates with the spacedimage intercepting elements on the rear side thereof and with light-permeable elements on the front sides in front of each image intercepting element.

'7. A screen as claimed in claim 1, in which the spaced elements are embedded in said refracting material.

8. A screen as claimed in claim 1, in which the spaced elements are inclined with respect to the front surface of/the said refracting material.

THEoDoR PAUL E'I'BAUER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2548967 *Sep 16, 1949Apr 17, 1951Arturo GivaudanThird dimension photographic projection screen
US2623433 *Sep 21, 1948Dec 30, 1952Stipek JohannStereoscopic projection system, including anaglyphic and polarizing filters
US2631496 *Aug 8, 1947Mar 17, 1953Rehorn Miles PStereoscopic viewing method and apparatus
US2647068 *Mar 16, 1948Jul 28, 1953Bishop H RussellProcess of treating vitreous materials
US2742816 *Oct 6, 1950Apr 24, 1956Corso Philip JPicture projection screen
US2906169 *Sep 4, 1953Sep 29, 1959Saffir Jacob AProjection screen
US2991693 *Jul 23, 1956Jul 11, 1961American Optical CorpFront projection screen
US4006965 *Dec 23, 1974Feb 8, 1977Ryosaku TakadaProjection screen
US5257130 *Jan 30, 1992Oct 26, 1993The Walt Disney CompanyApparatus and method for creating a real image illusion
US5493826 *Sep 14, 1993Feb 27, 1996Kalwall CorporationInsulating light transmitting flat structure panel providing the illusion of a three-dimensional array of step-like block structures, and method of constructing the same
US5543965 *May 11, 1994Aug 6, 1996Nvision Grafix, Inc.Method and apparatus for autostereoscopic lenticular displays utilizing random dot patterns
US5552934 *Mar 18, 1994Sep 3, 1996Spm CorporationBackground reflection-reducing plano-beam splitter for use in real image projecting system
US5886818 *Nov 2, 1994Mar 23, 1999Dimensional Media AssociatesMulti-image compositing
US6318868Oct 1, 1999Nov 20, 2001Larussa Joseph A.Interactive virtual image store window
WO1993015430A1 *Jan 29, 1993Aug 5, 1993Walt Disney ProdApparatus and method for creating a real image illusion
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/443, 359/478, 352/61
International ClassificationG03B21/60
Cooperative ClassificationG03B21/606
European ClassificationG03B21/60D