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Publication numberUS2211617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 13, 1940
Filing dateJul 27, 1939
Priority dateJul 27, 1939
Publication numberUS 2211617 A, US 2211617A, US-A-2211617, US2211617 A, US2211617A
InventorsPhilip Faber
Original AssigneeStanley Faber
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus
US 2211617 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 13, 1940. 1 P. FABER 2 ,211,617

' GAME APPARATUS Original Filed Aug. 21, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1- C k. 3 9 CI 36 G C g7 Q A c. a. c. g6?

L. 'L, k.

39 j 26 a INVEINTPR v 2 ig. .3. BY Pin Z Z13 Faar Zn)! ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 13, 1940 PATENT OICE GAME APPARATUS Philip Faber, Brooklyn,

N. Y., assignor to Stanley Faber, Brooklyn, N. Y;

Refiled for abandoned application Serial No. 222,434, August 21, 1938. This application July 27, 1939, Serial No. 2

3 Claims.

This invention relates to amusement apparatus,

and, more particularly, aims to provide an improved game of the kind incorporating a target,

and a missile to be directed and propelled toward the target by a person playing the game.

As herein employed, the term target is used to include any field of play toward which the missile is directed and propelled by a person playing the game and which includes a plurality of chutes, openings, cups, or any equivalent through or into any one of which the missile may pass or come to rest for scoring or preparing for the scoring of a game point. All devices such as those last named will herein generally be called receptors. As the term missile is used herein, it includes a puck, ball or other slidable or rollable or projectile object of play, whatever be its nature, so long as it is either thrown through the air or travelled over a guiding surface or surfaces to or toward a target including a plurality of receptors.

In a now favored way of carrying out the invention, the missile is traveled over a guiding surface all the way to the target, and it is desirably a ball to be rolled along said surface; and

the receptors are apertures. When the invention is thus carried out, it provides what is commonly known as a rolling ball game.

A popular type of amusement apparatus of the general class to which the present invention pertains, is one wherein at the far end of the apparatus and in back of the target there is an upstanding structure having a translucent panel illuminable, usually by electric bulbs behind the same, to give a signal that the game has been Won; with this signal including a plurality of signalling elements each of all or of a certain group of which must be illuminated, but each as the result of a separate scoring play of the missile relative to the target, in order to give the win signal.

The present invention has been made with the idea of providing a novel and valuable type of apparatus of the general class last-named, and one preferably having the features just recited, but one in which the object is attained of providing a number of different possible ways of Winning the game which is many times greater even than such a large possible number of different ways of winning the game as is taught by U. S. Patent No. 2,127,396 to me.

This application is filed in place of and as a substitute for application for the same subject matter, Serial No. 222,434 filed August 21, 1938, which latter application became abandoned.

In order to attain this object, the present invention provides, in combination with a plurality of signalling elements considerably less in number than the number of target receptors, means setting up an operative relationship between various target receptors and various signalling elements in such manner that when the missile coacts with any one of a particular plurality of said receptors a particular one of said signalling elements is actuated. As the invention is preferably carried out, the arrangement is such, also, that when the missile coacts with any one of a different particular plurality of the target receptors, a difierent particular one of the signalling elements is actuated, and when the missile coacts with any one of still a different particular plurality of the target receptors, still a different particular one of the signalling elements is actuated; and so on.

Other features and advantages of the invention will be apparent hereinafter.

In the accompanying drawings, in which I have shown a now preferred form of the invention as illustrative of the many possible ways in which the invention can be carried out:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of said embodiment, in the present case shown as a coin-actuated one.

- Fig. 2 is a central longitudinal vertical section taken through the game of Fig. 1, on a somewhat enlarged scale.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section, taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

' Fig. 4 is mainly an electrical diagram showing a simplified circuit and adjuncts thereto, certain of which latter are shown also in Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of one of five electromagnetic devices seen in rear elevation in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an end elevation of one of said devices.

Referring generallyto the exemplifying embodiment of the invention shown in the drawings, the same is one in which, for the purposes of illustration merely, and not by way of limitation, but merely to show in detail a present preference based on great public interest found by actual test, the winning signal comprises a plurality of signalling elements all of which must be actuated, but not in any special orderthese signalling elements in the present case being five in number, and being translucencies showing the component letters of the word Bingo; the target receptors are present in such number that the total of these is an even multiple of the total of signalling elements making up the winning signal; this multiple is obtained by taking up the square of the number of said component letters, that is, there are twenty-five target receptors; and each target receptor of a. different one of five different ones of five groups of these receptors, each group comprising five receptors, is assigned to a different one of the signalling elements.

As shown best in Fig. 1, where the target is indicated at T, the same is seen to comprise twentyfive apertures |8 in a table |9 along which a ball M is rolled from the end of the table opposite to the target-carrying end thereof, at which firstmentioned end of the table the player stations himself. As will also be noted from Fig. 1, five of said apertures are marked B, five others are marked I, five others are marked N, five others are marked G, and five others are marked 0. Further, as here shown, similarly marked apertures are nowhere in line with each other along the general line of travel of the ball, that is, in a direction substantially parallel with the longitudinal center-line of the table I9.

Referring now to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the table I!) forms the top Wall of a main horizontal casing 20, the latter also including a floor 2| spaced below the table, so as to provide a chamber 22 between the floor and the table. The chamber '22 is closed in by suitable end walls 23 and 24,

and by side walls 25 and 26. Each of these latter walls is upwardly extended as indicated at 25a and 26a along the major part of the table length, and the end wall 24 is similarly extended across the width of the table; so that these upward wall extensions provide between them an alley along which the missiles may be directed and propelled by the player while he is at his station, to prevent the missile, desirably a rubber ball, from inadvertently being sent over a side edge of the table or over an edge of the table beyond the target.

At the target carrying end of the table IS, the structure 20 is extended as an upright casing 21, spanning the width of the table; this casing for carrying the B, I, N, G and O translucencies 2| aforesaid, and other translucencies 28 for indicating, when desired, the number of balls played, that is, rolled toward the target and passed through any one of the target apertures |8, all as below explained.

The structure 20 may, of course, be mounted in any suitable place or manner; but, in the present case, the same is shown as supported on four table-legs 29.

It will be noted that the table l9, and also the floor 2|, are downwardly inclined toward the players end of the table. When the ball M passes down through any of the target apertures l8 it enters the chamber 22 and is received on the floor 2|, to roll down along the same until coming to rest in a pocket 30. Above this pocket is a hand-hole opening 3|, so that the ball can be retrieved by the player, to be again rolled over the table toward the target T, each time the ball is returned to the pocket.

Adjacent to each target aperture I8 is 2. normally open switch 32 suitably secured to the underside of the table |9; these switches adapted to be momentarily closed incidental to the missile dropping through the aperture associated with a particular switch.

Said switches 32 are for closing circuit subdivisions of electrical means according to an arrangement such that when the missile passes through any of the five B apertures |8, the B 'translucency 2| will become illuminated; when the missile passes through any of the five I apertures |8, the I translucency 2| will become illu minated; when the missile passes through any of the five N apertures |8, the N translucency 2| will become illuminated; and so on. This wiring of the switches 32 is indicated clearly in Fig. 3, where a common supply wire marked 33 in Figs. 3 and 4 (and additionally marked CS is Fig. 3) is provided for serving in parallel all the switches 32but which wire, to simplify Fig. 3, is actually shown as connected only to the five switches 32 serving the row of apertures l8 running length wise of the table l9 at the extreme right of Fig. 1. A similar showing is made in Fig. 3 of the wires which go to the terminals of all the switches 32 other than the terminals thereof connected to the common supply wire 33. Of these five wires last referred to, that marked 34 in Figs. 3 and 4 (and additionally marked B in Fig. 3), is shown as going in parallel to all the five B apertures l8 of the target. In the same way, although not so shown in Fig. 3, the wire marked 35 in Figs. 3 and 4 (and additionally marked I in Fig. 3) goes in parallel to all the five I apertures l8 of the target; the wire marked 36 in Figs. 3 and 4 (and additionally marked N in Fig. 3) goes in parallel to all the five N apertures |8 of the target; the wire marked 31 in Figs. 3 and 4 (and additionally marked G in Fig. 3) goes in parallel to all the five G apertures |8 of the target; and the wire marked 38 in Figs. 3 and 4 (and additionally marked 0 in Fig. 3) goes in parallel to all the five O apertures l8 of the target.

By the laws of choice and chance of elementary algebra, there are 3,125 possible ways of winning the game by causing all the five translucencies 2| making up the word Bingo to become lighted as the result of having the ball M pass through only five of the apertures l8 of the target T. That is to say, referring to the translucencies 2| the I can be illuminated in any one of five different ways, following the illumination of the B in any one of five different ways, reaching a total of 25 permutations; and at the same time, the illumination of the N is possible in any one of five different ways, reaching a total of permutations; while the illumination of the G is possible in any one of five different ways,

raising the total of permutations now to 625,

and the illumination of the O is possible in five different ways, giving, finally, a total of 3,125 permutations, or different possible ways of winning the game.

As is well-known in the art, the game can be played individually, and released for such play by insertion of the proper coin in any suitable type of coin-operated device, such as that indicated at 39; the same here shown as including, conventionally, a coin receptor 40, a coin-slide Al, and a cross-bar which on inthrust of the coin-slide strikes and actuates a setter 43a for a familiar type of timer 43. Such a timer is ordinarily operated by a spring wound up by such setter as a result of an inthrust of the coin-slide, and can usually be set to operate for any desired time interval, during which period of operation a normally open main switch for the electrical circuit including the switches 32 or equivalents is maintained closed.

In such operation of the game, it is advisable, also, as taught, for example, in the aforesaid patent to me, to count the number of times the missile is propelled toward the target and it passes through one of the apertures |8, so that the incentive to the player will not only be to cause the winning signal to be flashed before the time-interval available has expired, but also to accomplish this with the least possible number of such uses of the missile. To indicate this, in Fig. 1 the upright casing 21 is shown as having its front panel 44 such as to carry, above the legend Electric bingo thereon, the horizontal row of translucencies 28 aforesaid; these latter here being ten in number and carrying respectively the numbers from 1 to 10, and in the present case being individually lighted by separate electrical bulbs one of which is shown at 45 in Fig. 2.

Any suitable electrical arrangement can be provided to illuminate these translucencies in the order oftheir ordinal numbering, for instance as taught in the aforesaid patent to me;'as by successive closings of a normally open switch shown at 46 in Figs. 2 and 3, each time the ball M passes thereover, to which end the chamber 22 is shown as provided with partitions 41 ,to guide the ball always to pass over said switch while on its way down along the chamber 22 below the target T back to the pocket 30.

According to the present structure, it will be noted, the switch 46 is closed by the ball following each propulsion thereof to the target, regardless of whether the ball passes through an aperture l8 or not; because of the presence of the chevron-barrier v 48,so placed across the table IS, in relation to a pair of like openings 49 at opposite sides of the table, that whenever the ball is propelled to the target, as incidental to a ball leap over said barrier, it must, if it fails to pass through an aperture l8, enter one of said openings 49, and so be guided by the partitions 41 to roll over the switch 46.

Referring now particularly to Fig. 4, the normally open switch of the timer 39 is shown at 56.

This switch is connected at one terminal to a Wire 5| leading from one end of the secondary coil of a transformer 52, and is connected at its other terminal .to a wire 53 leading to another, and a normally closed, switch 54.

The illustration of the switch 54 is, like that of the other showings of Fig. 4, essentially diagrammatic, to simplify the description. Further to shorten the description and make easy an understanding of the operation of the electrical features of the apparatus as here shown, the circuit connections are so delineated that comparatively heavy lines are used for the wires which will be assumed to be the return conductors relative to the secondary of the transformer 52 as to all circuits and circuit-subdivisions, and, in addition, small arrows are placed alongside many of these return conductors so that they can readily be traced back to theend of the secondary of the transformer 52 opposite to the end thereof to which the wire 5| is connected.

The elementary wiring arrangement shown includes primarily what may be termed two main circuits; these being what may be called the op,- erating circuit normally open at the switches '32 but normally closed at the switch 54, by way of the contacts 55 and 56 thereof, and what may be called the clearing circuit normally open at the switch 54 but closable by way of the contacts 51 and 58 thereof. As will become clearer later, the operating circuit includes or has associated therewith a win-signal circuit, closed for the first time when the operating circuit has been properly modified by a playing of the game such that the missile M has been passed through five of the apertures l8 of the target T with each of said apertures allocated to a different one of the component letters of the word Bingo.

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The switch 54, shown as having a pivoted switch-arm 59 carrying thereon the contacts 56 and 57, is normally maintained in the position illustrated by a rectractile spring 60.

Referring first to the win circuit, this is for the purpose of giving one or more signals, ad

ditional to the flashing on of all the five letterparts of the translucencies 2| of Fig. 1 by five light bulbs 6| (see also Fig. 2, where one such bulb 6| is shown), when as aforesaid any five of the switches 32 associated with five of the target apertures l8 each marked with a different one of the letters B, I, N, G and 0, have all been closed in any sequence. In the present case, such additional win signal is shown as comprising an electric light bulb in a glass hood 62, this last as shown in Figs. 1 and 2 conveniently placed on top of the upright-casing 2i,

and the bulb therein being interposed in the win circuit. Such a visual signal, and also an audible signal, as an electric bell (not shown), to be simultaneously actuated when the win signal is closed, is particularly useful where the present game is employed as one of a bank or battery of a plurality of games, and where the players, each using one of the games, are in a contest with each other, and which contest is won by the player who first succeeds in closing the Win circuit.

The win circuit, beyond the wire 5| and the timer switch 50, includes the wire 53, the switcharm 59 and its contact 56, the contact 55, a wire 63, a wire 64, and beyond the last of five relays 65, 66, 61, 68 and 69, a wire 16, a wire H, and

a wire 12 back to the secondary of the transformer.

This win circuit is normally open, therefore, at five gaps therein, these gaps being, respectively, between the wire 64 and a wire '73 joining the relays 65 and 66, between said wire l3 and a wire 14 joining the relays 66 and 67, between saidwire 14 and a wire 15 joining the relays 6? and 68, between said wire 15 and a wire 76 joining the relays 68 and 69, and between said wire 16 and a wire 10.'

' tures immediately in front of the upright casing 21), are also markedv with a different one of the component letters of the word Bingo; and different ones of the bulbs 6| serving different ones of the component letters of the word Bingo which constitute the translucency 2i of Fig. l, are indicated in Fig. 4 by the dot-and-dash outlining of said component letters.

Note further from Fig. 4 that in agreement with the showing of Fig. 3, a wire 34 goes to one terminal of that one of the last-mentioned switches 32 also marked B, a wire 35 goes to one terminal of that one of said switches 32 also marked I, a wire 36 goes to one terminal of that one of said switches 32 also marked N, a wire 31 goes to one terminal of that one of said switches 32 also marked G, and a wire 38 goes to one terminal of that one of said switches also marked 0.

Also note from Fig. 4 that from the wire 3 extends a wire 34 having four branches in parallel between the braces marked B; from the wire 35 extends a wire 35 having four branches in parallel between the braces marked I; from the wire 36 extends a wire 36' having four branches in parallel between the braces marked N; from the wire 31 extends a wire 31 having four branches in parallel between the braces marked G; and from the wire 38 extends a wire 38 having four branches in parallel between the braces marked 0. As will be understood, each of these parallel branches from the wire 34, goes to a separate one of the four switches 32 (other than the switches marked 32 and also B in Fig. 4) serving the apertures I8 of the target marked B in Fig. 1; each of said branches from the wire 35' goes to a separate one of four switches 32 serving the I apertures I8; each of said branches from the wire 36 goes to a separate one of four switches 32 serving the N apertures I8; and so on, similarly, as to the wires 31' and 38, their branches for, respectively four G target apertures l8, and four 0 target apertures I8while from the common supply wire 33 for the five switches 32 marked also B, I, N, G and 0, respectively, in Fig. 4, a branch 33' extends, having twenty branches thereof in parallel each for serving one of the remaining twenty of the twenty-five switches 32 as indicated by the approaches of these branches to the. braces associated with the indications B, I, N, G and O.

In brief, the arrangement is such, as will be seen from a mere inspection of Fig. 4 (but as will be explained in detail below), that when any switch 32 associated with a B aperture I 8 of Fig. 1 is closed by passage of the ball B through that aperture, the relay 69 will be operated; when any of said switches associated with an I aperture I8 of Fig. 1, the relay 68 will be operated; when any of said switches associated with an N aperture I8 of Fig. 1, the relay 61 will be operated; when any of said switches associated with a G aperture I8 of Fig. 1, the relay 66 will be operated; and when any of said switches associated with an O aperture I8 of Fig. 1, the relay 65 will be operated.

The purpose of operating any such relay is to close two circuit subdivisions of the operating circuit, one for flashing on the appropriate bulb 6|, and the other for closing one of the aforesaid gaps between the wire 64 and the return wire I0, to wit, the gaps intervening between said wire 64 and the wires I3, I4, I5 and I6 (these last four wires joining adjoining relays) and the return wire from the last relay in the seriesthereby to transform the last-referred to circuit subdivision of the operating circuit into an effective win circuit because a closed such circuit.

And in this connection it is pointed out that each relay includes, in addition to an actuating electromagnet and an armature attracted thereto, two pairs of normally spaced contacts, each pair in a separate circuit subdivision, but rearranged by energization of the magnet to close both said circuit subdivisions.

Referring at this point to Figs. 5 and 6, the relay 65 there shown will be now described. As all the relays are alike in construction and operation, the description of this one Will sufiice for all.

The electromagnet thereof is indicated at IT, and its armature at 18, this armature being pivotally hung at I9 and carrying an L-shaped bracket 80. Through suitable slots (not shown) in the bottom or horizontal limb of this bracket extend the lower ends of a pair of sidewisely spaced depending leaf-spring carriers 8| each having a contact normally spaced from a cooperant contact, with each of the latter contacts on one of a pair of sidewisely spaced depending leaf-spring carriers 82. One of these sets of contacts is for flashing on the proper bulb GI, and the other set is for closing one of the aforesaid five gaps in the win circuit and that one of these gaps at one side of the relay. In the case of the relay 65, the gap to be closed is that between the wires 64 and I3 of Fig. 4.

The upper ends of the four leaf-spring carriers 8| and 82 are suitably anchored between blocks 83 of insulation secured to a mounting 84 which carries part of the pivotal support I9 and to which the magnet I1 is attached.

When the relay is energized as above, the armature I8 and the bracket are swung to the positions shown in broken lines in Fig. 5, both of the two sets of contacts, each set on one pair of carriers 8| and 82 and the other set on the other pair of these carriers, are brought together, to circuit closing position; and the parts are thus locked by latching engagement between the bracket 80 and a toothed dog 84 pivoted at 85 and biased in the direction of the arrow 86 by a spring 81 The relay 65 is so interiorly wired or otherwise suitably provided with interval conductors, that,

referring to Fig. 6, a binding post 88 is electrical- 1 ly connected to the carrier 8| at the left in Fig. 6, and a binding post 89 is electrically connected to the carrier 8| at the right in Fig. 6.

Referring to the contact-carriers BI and 82 at the left in Fig. 6, the wire 64 leads to the binding post 88 and therefore to the carrier 8|, while from the binding post 89 extends a wire "I3 for connecting the carrier 82 with a binding post of the next relay 66 to the right in Fig. 4 beyond the relay 65 as shown in Fig. 4, the last-mentioned binding post corresponding to the binding post 88 of the relay 65. In the same way the wire I4 couples up the relays 66 and 61, the wire I5 couples up the relays 6'! and 68, and the wire I6 couples up the relays 68 and 69.

Referring now to Fig. 4 and to the contactcarriers BI and 82 at the right of each relay, a wire 90 leads from the binding post 89 of relay 65 to the appropriate bulb 6| of the translucency 2|, and a wire 9| leads to the carrier 82 of relay 65-it being noted that this wire 9| is an extension of the aforesaid wire 38 which, in parallel with the wire 38 serving all the switches 32 associated with the appropriate target apertures I8, is itself an extension of the common supply wire 33. In the case of the relays 66, 61, 68 and 69, the wires corresponding to the wire 90 from the relay 65 are, respectively, wires 92, 93, 94 and 95; and the wires corresponding to the wire 9| to said relay 65 are, respectively, the wires 96, 91, 98 and 99.

From each of the wires 9|, 96, 91, 98 and 99 is a branch for acting as a supply wire to the winding of the electromagnet of the associated relay; these branches being shown at I00, IOI, I02, I03 and I04.

The return Wires for these windings are marked I05, I06, I01, I08 and I09, all leading, through the return wires II and 12, back to the secondary of the transformer.

The return wires for the bulbs 6| are marked IIO, III, H2, H3 and H4, all leading, through the return wire I2, back to the secondary of the transformer.

desirable, particularly when coin-operated, to

Operation Whenever any switch 32 of any of the letter series matching any of the component letters of the word BINGO isclosed by passage of the ball M through an appropriate target aperture I8, the magnet of the proper relay is momentarily energized, to close both the switch elements of that relay (these switch elements being the two pairs of contact-carriers 8I-82); and these, switch elements will be held closed by the latching means, including the toothed dog 84 of Figs. and 6, if the relay 65 is the one operated or by "a like latching means if it is another relay which is operated. Thereby, the appropriate bulb 6| will become and stay lighted; and one of the aforesaid five gaps in the win circuit will be closed. As soon as the ball is passedthrough five differently lettered apertures I8, regardless of the order of such letters, all five of these gaps will be closed (that is, all the wires 64, I3, I4, I5, I6, and the return wire beyond the relay 69, will be made in effect one conductor), and, as the translucency 2| shows for the first time the complete word Bingo, the win circuit will be closed, and the light within the hood 62 will be flashed on.

Such win circuit, from the secondary of the transformer 52, includes the wire 5|, the switcharm 59, the contacts 56 and 55, the wire 63, the filament of the light within the hood 62, the wire 64, parts of the five relays as above described, the intervening wires 13, I4, .5 and I6, and the return wires I0, H and I2 back to the secondary of the transformer.

In order to clear the game, it is merely necessary, in the arrangement illustrated, momentarily to move the switch-arm 59 against its spring 60. This can be done manually, or electrically, as by an electromagnet H5.

When the switch-arm 59 is thus moved, the win circuit is opened, so that the bulb in the hood 62 goes out; and, simultaneously, the clearing circuit is closed, this including five like magnet-releasors for the latching means associated with each relay. As shown in the case of the relay 65 (Figs. 4, 5 and 6), each such releasor in- I The five magnets H6 thus associated with the I five relays are simultaneously energized; and so all the lights 6| then on, are put out.

And, playing of the game can be started all over again, as soon as the switch-arm 59 is returned to the condition illustrated in Fig. 4,

which can be done by manual release of said arm,

or by breaking the circuit in which the magnet H5 is interposed. Each of the magnets corresponding to the magnet H6 of Figs. 4, 5 and 6, is, as shown in Fig. 4, supplied with current by one of five parallel connections H8, H9, I20, I2l and I22 frorrr'a wire I22, leading from contact 58; these magnets having return connections I23, I24, I25, I26 and I21, leading, respectively, 'to the return connections I05, I06, I01, I08 and I09 serving the operating magnets for the relays; it being noted that the clearing circuit is made through the contacts 51 and 58 of the switch 54, as the win circuit is broken between the contacts 55 and 56 of said switch.

When the game is played individually, it is have an automatic timer, as shown. I

When the game is employed as one of a battery of its fellows, where different players simultaneously compete with each endeavoring to be the first to obtain the win signal at his game, the timer can be eliminated-that is, the time for play can be that required for some one of the contestants to achieve the win signal.

When a knock-out means is employed, that is, a means to clear all other games in'the battery of games last-mentioned except the winning game, when one of the games becomes the winning one, any suitable such means can be used, as, for instance, to energize in each of the nonwinning games an electromagnet similar in function to'the magnet H5. As here shown, however, in Fig. 4 the timer 39 is illustrated as having a switch II'I additional to the switch 50; this switch II'I beingof the well-known type which when actuated is snapped momentarily to closed positon, as by a cam element (not shown) moved past the same by theactuator therefor, but immediately thereafter, as by a suitable spring (not shown), becoming restored to normal open position. Such actuator could be the crossbar' 42 of Fig. 3. The purpose of this switch H1 is to cause momentary energization of the magnet I I5, thereby to move the clearing circuit whenever (following the ending of a previous playing of the. game by the expiration of the appointed time interval measured by the timer 39), another playing of the game is about to be started, with the game used as an individual game. The circuit thus momentarily closed by closing of the switch I I1 includes the winding of magnet H5, a wire H9 leading from the switch I", and a return wire I20 from said winding to the return wires II and I2 going back to the secondary of the transformer.

Aside from those mentioned other variations and modifications are possible within the scope of the invention, and parts of the improvements may be used without others.

I claim:

1. A game of the kind wherein there is a target including a bank of interceptors for a missile such as a rolled ball, wherein there is a signalling means including a plurality of individually operable electrically operating signalling devices each of which is normally in a different Open circuit and all of which devices must be actuated to signal the winning of a game, and wherein each of said circuits includes a switch means operatively associated with a direrent interceptor and operable to close said circuit to actuate the appropriate one of said devices following interception of the missile by said interceptors-characterized by the combination of a plurality of said signalling devices to a total of N; a plurality of said interceptors to a total greater than N, such total large enough to provide more than one interceptor for each signalling device and with each interceptor for one signalling device only; and a plurality of said circuits to a 1 total of N, each of said circuits having a plurality of circuit subdivisions, there being a different one of said circuit subdivisions for each interceptor, each of said circuit subdivisons being'normally open, there being a different one of said switching means in each circuit subdivision which when closed closes that subdivision, and all circuit subdivisions in any circuit being in parallel in that circuit to cause closing of said circuit when any circuit subdivision thereof is closed, whereby N difl'erent pluralities of interceptors are provided and any interceptor of any one of said pluralities is adapted on interception of the missile by that interceptor to actuate one of said signalling devices and a different one of said devices is actuated when the missile is intercepted by one of a different plurality of interceptors, provided the said interceptor is the first interceptor of its own plurality of interceptors 19 to intercept the missile.

2. A game as in claim 1, in which the signal-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2614840 *Nov 6, 1947Oct 21, 1952Arthur Peter SmithBall game device
US2853304 *May 2, 1955Sep 23, 1958American Nat Bank And Trust CoPreview score control for ball games
US3034790 *Mar 12, 1956May 15, 1962American Nat Bank And Trust CoSelectively changeable score indicating and display means
US3384375 *Jan 4, 1966May 21, 1968Murray ZifferblattGame board with projectile receivers, selectively operated switches, and indicators
US3415521 *Oct 17, 1966Dec 10, 1968Arthur LooffGame with score recording mechanism
US5803451 *Sep 17, 1996Sep 8, 1998Rlt Acquisition, Inc.Arcade game having multiple score indicators
DE950885C *Jul 22, 1953Oct 18, 1956Theodor BendorffSelbstkassierendes Spielgeraet
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/123.00A
International ClassificationA63F3/06, A63F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0645, A63F7/0058
European ClassificationA63F3/06E, A63F7/00E