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Publication numberUS2212486 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 20, 1940
Filing dateFeb 21, 1940
Priority dateFeb 21, 1940
Publication numberUS 2212486 A, US 2212486A, US-A-2212486, US2212486 A, US2212486A
InventorsOrren E Zoder
Original AssigneeZoder Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety apparatus
US 2212486 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 20, 1940. o. E. zoDER SAFETY APPARATUS Filed Feb. 21, 1940 V27/Wham m. 1W A u w W. IA,

2 Sheets-Sheet. l

Aug. 20, 1940.' o. E. zoDER 2,212,486

, SAFETY APPARATUS Filed Feb. 2l, 1940 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 6.

FIG]

@@/Q/ 97 87 a5 //I Patented Aug. 20, 1940 UNITED -s'rATrs SAFETY APPARATUS I Orren E. Zoder, St. Louis, Mo., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Zoder, Incorporated, St. Louis,

Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application February 21, 1940, Serial No. 320,015

23 Claims. (Cl. 12S-436) This invention relates to safety apparatus, and with regard to certain morespeciiic features, to safety apparatus for tanks which carry dangerous fluids, such as inflammables.

5. The invention is an improvement upon the invention disclosed in my United States patent application Serial No. 305,159, led November 18, 1939, for Safety apparatus, and its divisional application Serial No. 337,183, filed May 25, 1940,

for Safety apparatus, and upon the construction disclosed in United States Patent 1,461,662, dated July 10, 1923.

Among the several objects of the invention may be noted the provision of improved means to avoid under certain abnormal conditions an emptying action from a tank through a pump and carbureter; the provision of such means wherein under most normal operating conditions the pump is relieved of safety valve operating duty; and the provision of means o-f the class described which, when the pump does operate said valve, the pump operates only against a light load. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises the elements and combinations of elements, features of construction, and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the structures hereinafter described, and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which are illustrated several of various` possible embodiments of the invention,

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic side elevation of the invention shown applied;

Fig. 2 is an enlargedy vertical section of the invention showing it in protective position;

Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 2 but further enlarged showing the device in. a normal operating .condition and approximately on line 3-3 of Fig. 4;

y Fig. 4 is a horizontal section taken on line 4 4 of Fig. 3;

Fig 5 is a horizontal section takenon line 5-5 of Fig. 3; v

Fig. 6 is a vertical section showing another form of the invention; and,

Fig. 7 is a horizontal section taken on line 1-1 of Fig. 6.

Similar reference characters indicate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now more particularly to Fig. 1, there is shown at numeral I a tank which is a class example of tanks for inflammable fluids and to which the present invention applies. Inserted intothe tank is a suction line 3, which reaches to a point near the bottom of the tank, so that by drawing olf fluid through the line 3,. the tank may be substantially emptied.` 5

The invention consists in a hollowl body 5 which may be supported on the tank I by means ofy a bracket 1. The body 5 is fastened to and in communication with the suction line 3. A strainer 9 serves the usual protective purposes 10 against withdrawal of foreign material.

Fastened to the body 5 is an enclosing cap Ii, which, with the aid of a gasket I3, clamps in place a flexible, impermeable diaphragm I 5. Thin sheet metal is a suitable material for thef1`5 diaphragm.

Thev diaphragm has fastened at its center on its lower side a valve holder I1 which at I9 slides and is guided in the body member 5. The holder l1 is providedV with a shoulder 59. The shoulder f 20 59 by contacting with a shoulder 6I. in the body 5 limits downward movement of the holder I1. The holder is also provided with polygonal faces 2l for the passage of iluid toward anfoutlet 23. Fastening means 25, by means of which the'25 holder I1 is hermetically sealed to the diaphragm l5, also holds in place an 'upper washer 21. A predeterminately compressedsp-ring 29 presses against the washer 21 to bias the diaphragmv I5.

The other end of the spring 29 reacts against'30 the cap II in a recess 3|. The boss which carries the recess has threaded thereto a suction line 32 which reaches to the intake manifold 33 of the internal combustion engine` 35 which is served by this apparatus. A carbureter serves/.35 the manifold-33 as shown at 31 and has a fluid connection 39 with a fluid (gasoline) pump 4I operated by the internal combustion engine. The pump 4I draws fluid over a line 43 from th outlet 23;

The holder I1 slidably carries a valve 45. The head 41 of this valve is engageable with a valve seat 49 in the body 5. The valve 45 is provided with a slot 5l which permits a limited movement of the valve in the holder I1. Limitation of u215 movement is imposed by a pin 53 which is held by the holder I1 and passesthrough the slot 5I.

possible low elevation, while the gasoline tanks suchv as #5.5

Thus, the valve is normally-5.0

I, may be higher. 'Ihis incurs a suction head upon the contents of a tank such as I, due tol a `syphon action over the line 43; that is, when an engine such as 35 is shut off and there is a leaky oat valve in the carbureter 31 and leaky or weak valves in the pump 4I. This causes syphoning of inflammable uid from the tank I, which may runout of the bowl of the carbureter 31 and into the boat to cause a re hazard. f The present invention avoids this hazard.

Operation of the device is as follows: v First let it be assumed that the engine 35 is shut 01T. This means that atmospheric pressure is then carried in the manifold 33 and that the diaphragm I5 is depressed by the spring 29, as shown in Fig. 2. This causes the shoulder 59 of the body member I1 to be seated on the shoulder 5I of the body 4 and places the pin 53 41, on the valve seat 49.

at some distance down in the slot 5I. This compresses the valve spring 51 to seat the valve head The strength of the spring 51 is made vsuch that, should the valves in the pump 4I and in the carbureter 31 leak,

i the springr51 will hold shut the valve 45 and prevent a syphoning action under the gravity head in the line 43. Thus, danger of syphoning action is avoided during non-operating periods of the engine 35, regardless of the condition of the valves of the carbureter 31 and pump 4I. On the other hand the spring 51 is made no stronger than necessary to accomplish the above.

When the engine 35 starts two things occur:

V1. A vacuum is drawn in the manifold 33.

-This vacuum extends to the line 32 and is applied to the top of the diaphragm I5, thus drawing the latter up against the action of spring 29 and promptly relieving spring 51.

2. At the same time the pump 4I draws uid over the line 43 from the line 3. 'Ihis causes a tendency to open the valve 41 if it is not already open, but ultimately the suction in the line 32 becomes great enough to lift the diaphragm I5 to a position where the pin 53 moves to the upper end of the slot 5I and positively opens the valve 41 without aid from the action of pump 4I. This action entirely unloads the pump 4I of the duty of lifting the valve 41 against the valve spring 51 (see Fig. 3). Thus, the wear on pump 4I is decreased and its life is increased.

Should a condition occur in which the vacuum in the line 32 is substantially reduced, as by quickly accelerating the engine 35, then the diaphragm I5 will accordingly proportionally descend and carry down with it the member I1 and the valve 45. 'I'his causes the valve 45 to seat more or less, depending upon the degree of loss of vacuum. The greater the vacuum loss after the valve 45 seats, the more spring 25 expands and the greater the valve spring 51 is deflected as valve 45 seats. The pump 4| by its suction action over line 43 causes an opening of the valve 45 against spring 51 each time that the pump makes a suction stroke. But, the pump teriallyextends the life of the pump, as stated Yabove.

' And even `whenthe pump 4I iscalled upon to .,open'the valve 45, it is not'opening it against `partially reduces deflection (and loading) the action of the spring 29, but only against the relatively weak spring 51. Thus, even under maximum valve opening duty, the pump 4I is called upon only to act against the small load of the spring 51.

Furthermore, it is seldom thatthe vacuum is entirely lost in the manifold 33 while the engine is operating, so that when the pump-4I is working the spring 29 is seldom: deflected its maximum. That is, the partial lifting `effect of the diaphragm I5, even during acceleration, at least of spring 51A so that the work of the pump 4I is reduced. l v

On the other hand, it is certain that, when the motor has stopped, the vacuum is entirely lost in the manifold 53, which ensures that the spring 25 will press the diaphragm I5 down its maximum extent, thus seating the valve 45 and deecting the lower spring 51 to its maximum. Under this condition the spring 51, being deflected a maximum amount, consequently vexerts its greatest force against opening the valve 45, and therefore greatest resistance against syphoning action over the line 43. This extra resistance is particularly useful (reliable) on boats where the rolling and pitching changes the syphon head.

And, at all other times, when the engine 35 is operated the diaphragm I5 is at least somewhat higher than in its lowermost position, thus drawing back the upper end of the spring 51 so that its required deflection-is less.

It will be understood thatmechanical equivalents of the diaphragm I5 would be a Sylphon bellows. or a piston, or the like.

It will be perceived that if desired the diaphragm I5 may be made self-returning, instead of employing the spring 29. This may be done by making it a Sylphon bellows or the like.

It will be seen that if desired the expansion of the spring 51 under the conditions of Fig. 3 may be complete so that there is no compression in the spring. This means that under partial vacuum conditions above the diaphragm I5 there will be required the lowest possible deflecting force for that spring in opening the valve 45 by action of the pump 4I. vAt the same time the spring 51 is designed for producing a force, when deflected the necessary amount for the position of parts as shown in Fig. 2 (dead engine), that the suction head in line i3 will not open the valve.

Acceleration of engines such as 35 may occur at any speed. Therefore it is possible that the diaphragm I5 may sink at any speed of the engine 35, thus closing the valve 45. Under such conditions it is not desirable that the pump 4I reopen the valve against the action of the diaphragm I5 and its spring 29. Itis for this reason that I use the spring 51 between the diaphragm and the valve so that under accelerating conditions at any speed the pump 4I' needs only to open the Valve 45 against the relatively light spring 51.

This invention makes the spring 51 easy and not so critical to design, becauseY the valve 41 can more definitely be closed with a stronger spring 51 against the hydraulic syphon head, while depending upon the intake manifold suction to definitely open it when the engine starts,

Without overloading the pump 4I for the latter purpose. Thus, more hydraulic syphon head can be resisted.

vupper end of a valve stem 61.

ber is essentially a hollow lhousing wherein is a movable member or diaphragm divi-ding it into two compartments. One lcompartment V(the lower one) on one side of the diaphragm has an-inlet for connection with the supply container and an outlet for connection with a fluid pump -of the engine; whereas the compartment on the other Side (upper side) of the diaphragm has a suction outlet for connection with the suction manifold olf-that same engine. The valve in the lower compartment closes against the inlet of that compartment and is biased away from the diaphragm toward closing position. The compartment below the diaphragm may be designated as a flow compartment, and the compartment above the diaphragm may be designated as a suction compartment.

In Figs. 6 and 7 is shown another form of the invention wherein likenumerals designate like parts. In this case, the diaphragm l5 carries a head 65 whichon its lower side contacts the The valve stem S1 being of triangular form and guided on its rounded corners through a circular opening may pass iiuid. The lower end of the stem 61 is provided with a valve head 69 which is normally pressed by means of a spring 'i3 into closed position at a seat ll. A suitable vacuum in the line 43 caused by the action of the pump 4|, in addition to any syphon head, will result in depression of the diaphragm l5 so that the anvil 65 presses down the stem 6l to open the valve 69 against the action of the spring 13. It is intended that a mere syphon head will not accomplish this end, the spring 13 being adapted to the purpose.

Attached to the body. 5 is a head block 15, which among other things clamps down the edge of the diaphragm l5 in connection with the gasket i3. This block has a hollow portion formed as a vertical cylinder intersected by concentric horizontal cylinders 19 and 8|. Cylinder 8| is capped as shown at 83 and is provided internally with a sliding piston 85. Cap 83 carries a connection 3| for line 32. The piston 85 has a reduced extension 81 which passes through the vertical cylinder 17 and at its other end is provided with a slide 89 which operates inthe guide cylinder lt. A slot 9| permits air to work freely behind the slide 89.

A compression spring 93 normally presses the piston 35 to the left as shown, but any vacuum drawn in the line 32 which is attached to the engine intake manifold 33 tends (through 3|) to draw piston 85 against the pressure of the spring 93.

In the vertical cylinder 'l1 is a piston 95, bifurcated at 91, freely to accommodate the reduced waist 81 as shown in Fig. 7. Ihe bottom of the slot 9`| of the piston 95 is normally pressed upv ward by the expansive action of the spring 'I3 acting through the valve stem 5l, head 65 and a plug 99 attached to the piston 95. A cam portion ll between the waist 81 and the slide 89 is adapted, upon motion of the piston 85 to the right, to contact the lower end of the notch Q1 and force down the parts 95, 99, 65, I5, 61, thus opening the valve 69 against the action of the spring '|3. This occurs under a vacuum in the line 32, so that whenever the engine is operating, the valve 59 is opened, or partially opened, depending upon the degree of vacuum.

Air is introduced behind the pistons 85 and 95 by the ports |93 in an adjustable cap |95.

Piston 95 may fit loosely because of the diaphragm l5.

From the above it will be seen that this alternative form of the invention results in a mechanical opening of the valve 69 whenI a vacuum exists in the intake manifold of the engine, as when the engine is operating. When this vacuum` is destroyed, or reduced,.the valve 59 closes or tends to close. Thus, the vacuum engendered by the pump in the line 13 is called upon to open the valve only when it is not being opened by the intake manifold vacuum. This, as already explained, serves to relieve the pump of its load under all conditions in which the intake manifold vacuum is eiiective.

If the diaphragm l5 should break, the member |05 may be screwed down until a gasket it? beneath it seats, thus cutting off the air inlet ports m3. This eliminates outward leakage of gasoline that may pass the broken diaphragm l5. At the same time, the lower end of the member E95 contacts the upper end of the bifurcated piston t5 and forces down the valve 69 to hold it open without suction aid either from the line 32 or 43. Then the pump simply draws through the open valve @a without the features described being operative. This is an emergency feature to permit temporary operation after a diaphragm has been broken.

In View of the above, it will be seen that the several objects of the invention are achieved and other advantageous results attained.

As many changes could be made in the above constructions without departing from the scope of the invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a movable member dividing said housing into two compartments, a compartment on one side of the movable member having an inlet and an outlet for connection with 'a fluid pump of an ene gine, the compartment on the other side of the member having a suction outlet for connection to a suction manifold of said engine, a valve in the first-named compartment closing outwardly toward the inlet of that compartment, and means biasing said valve away from said movable member and toward closing position.

2. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a movable member dividing said housing into two compartments, a compartment on one side of the movable member having an inlet from a fluid tank and an outlet connecting with a fluid pump of an engine, the compartment on the other side of the movable member having a suction outlet for connection to a suction manifold of said engine, a valve in the first-named compartment closing against the inlet of that compartment, means biasing said valve away from said movable member, and a lost-motion connection between the valve and movable member whereby motion of the latter away from the valve finally unseats the valve. i

3. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a movable member dividing said housing into two compartments, a compartment on one side of the member having an inlet and an outlet for connection with a fluid pump of an engine, the

the inlet of that compartment, means biasing said valve away from said member and toward closing position, and means on the other side of the movable member biasing it toward the valve.

4. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow body, a movable member dividing the hollow of said body into two compartments, the compartment on one side of said member having an inlet from a fluid tank and an outlet connected to a pump of an engine, the compartment on the other side of the member having an outlet connect-ed to an intake manifold of said engine, a Valve in said first-named compartment seating against flow from the inlet, a spring between the valve and the support normally biasing the valve to its seat, a spring on the other side of the movable member normally biasing the movable member to bias the valve toward its seat, the last-named spring being stronger than the first-named spring.

5. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow body, a movable member dividing the hollow of said body into two compartments, the compartment on one side of said member having an inlet from a fluid tank and an outlet connected to a pump of an engine, the compartment on the other side of the member having an outlet connected to an intake manifold of said engine, a valve in said first-named compartment seating against flow from the inlet, a valve support connected to the movable member and having a lost-motion connection with said valve, said connection being adapted to move the valve to open position upon predetermined movement of said movable member away from the valve, a spring between the valve and its support normally biasing the valve to its seat, and a spring on the other side of the member normally biasing the member toward the valve to cause the valve to seat.

6. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow body, a movable member dividing the hollow of said body into two compartments, the compartment on one side of said member having an inlet from a fluid tank and an outlet connected to a pump of an engine, the compartment on the other side of the member having an outlet connected to an intake manifold of said engine, a valve in said firstnamed compartment seating against flow from the inlet, a valve support connected to the movable member and having a lost-motion connection with said valve, said connection being adapted to move the valve to open position upon predetermined movement of said movable member away from the valve, a spring between the valve and its support normally biasing the valve to its seat, and a spring on the other side of the member normally biasing the member toward the valve to cause the valve to seat, the last-named spring being stronger than the first-named spring.

7. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a flexible diaphragm dividing saidvhousing into a suction compartment and a flow compartment, the ow compartment having an inlet from a tank and an outlet connected to a fuel pump of an engine, the suction compartment having a suction outlet connected to the intake manifold of said engine, a valve seating against flow from said inlet, a valve holder attached to said diaphragm, spring means on the other side of the diaphragm normally biasing the diaphragm toward the valve, spring means between the valve and said holder normally biasing said valve to its seat, and a lost-motion connection between the valve and the holder whereby the holder in a lifted position may withhold the valve fromY its seat, said valve spring means under such conditions having a maximum expansion and the spring means above the diaphragm under such conditions being compressed under vacuum conditions. v

8. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a flexible diaphragm in the housing dividing it into two compartments, a liquid outlet in one compartment subject to syphon head and an inlet therein, a suction outlet in the other compart-l ment, a valve in the first-named compartment closing toward the inlet, a valve spring biasing said valve away from the diaphragm toward its closing position, a spring on the other side of the diaphragm normally biasing the diaphragm toward the valve to compress the valve spring when the valve seats, said valve spring being designed to eff-ect a force under the last-named conditions wherein the syphon suction head to which the outlet is subjected will not open the valve.

9. Safety apparatus comprising .a hollow housing, a iiexible diaphragm in the housing dividing it into two compartments, a liquid outlet in one compartment subject to syphon head and an inlet therein, a suction outlet in the other compartment, a valve in the first-named compartment closing toward the inlet, a valve spring biasing said valve away from the diaphragm toward its closing position, a spring on the other side of the diaphragm normally biasing the diaphragm toward the valve to compress the valve spring when the valve seats, said valve spring being designed to effect a force under the last-named conditions wherein the syphon suction head to which the outlet is subjected will not open the Valve, and a lost-motion connection between the valve and the diaphragm adapted to unload the valve spring when suction occurs at the suction outlet.

10. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a flexible diaphragm in the housing dividing it into two compartments, a liquid outlet in one compartment subject to syphon head and an inlet therein, a suction outlet in the other compartment, a valve in the first-named compartment closing toward the inlet, a valve spring biasing said valve away from the diaphragm toward its closing position, a spring on the other side of the diaphragm normally biasing the diaphragm toward the valve to compress the valve spring when the valve seats, said valve spring being designed -to effect a force under the last-named conditions wherein the syphon suction head to which the outlet is sub-jected will not open the valve, and a lost-motion connection between the valve and the diaphragm adapted to unload the valve spring when suction occurs at the suction outlet and upon greater suction entirely to lift the valve from its seat.

11. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a flexible diaphragm in the housing dividing it into two compartments, a liquid outlet in one compartment and an inlet, a suction outlet in the other compartment subject to a syphon head, a valve in the first-named compartment, a valve spring biasing said valve toward its seat, a spring on the other side of the diaphragm normally biasing the diaphragm toward the valve to compress the valve spring when the valve seats, said valve spring being designed to effect a force under the last-named conditions wherein the syphon head will not open the valve, suction in said suction outlet being adapted to draw the diaphragm into position to unload the valve spring according to said suction. l

12. Safety apparatus comprising a hollow housing, a flexible diaphragm in the housing dividing it into two compartments, a liquid outlet in'one compartment and an inlet, a suction outlet in the other compartment subject to a syphon head, a valve in the first-named compartment, a valve spring biasing said valve toward its seat, a spring on the other side of the diaphragm normally biasing the diaphragm toward the valve to compress the valve spring when the valve seats, said valve spring being designed to effect a force under the last-named conditions wherein the syphon head will not open the valve, suction in said suction outlet being adapted to draw the diaphragm into position to unload the valve spring according to said suction, and a lost-motion connection between the diaphragm and the valve whereby the latter is lifted under diaphragm movement.

13. Safety apparatus comprising a housing, a flexible diaphragm dividing said housing into two compartments, one compartment having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, the other compartment having a suction outlet, a valve in the first-named' compartment seating toward said inlet, means connecting the valve and the diaphragm and including a biasing element tending to load the valve after the diaphragm seats it, and a lostmotion connection between the Valvey and the diaphragm tending to effect lifting of the valve after a predetermined movement of the diaphragm away from said seat, said diaphragm being normally biased toward the seat, but adapted under suction conditions in said suction outlet to moveaway from the seat.

14. Safety apparatus comprising a housing, a

flexible diaphragm dividing said housing intotwo compartments, one compartment having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, the other compartment having a suction outlet, a valve in the first-named compartment seating toward said inlet, means connecting the valve and the diaphragm and including a biasing element tending to load the valve after the diaphragm seats it, and a lost-motion connection between the valve and the diaphragm tending to effect lifting of the valve after a predetermined movement of the diaphragm away from said seat, said diaphragm being normally biased toward the seat, but adapted under suction conditions in said suction outlet to move away from the seat, the motion of the diaphragm toward the seat, after the valve is seated, being enough to deflect the valve-biasing element to load the valve to remain closed against a predetermined suction in said liquid outlet.

15. Safety apparatus for an internal combustion engine having a suction manifold and a iiuid pump and served by a fluid. tank, comprising a hollow body, a movable member in said body dividing it into two compartments, one of which compartments has a suction inlet communicating with the tank and an outlet communicating with the pump, the other compartment having a suction connection with said suction manifold, a valve closing toward said inlet, and means between the movable member and the valve normally biasing the valve toward its seat.

16. Safety apparatus for an internal combustion engine having a suction manifold and a fluid pump and served by a iiuid tank, comprising a hollow body, a movable member in said body dividing it into two compartments, one of which compartments has a suction inlet communicating with the tank and an outlet communicating with the pump, the other compartment having a suction connection with saidjsuction manifold, a valve closing toward said inlet, and means between the movable member and the valve normally biasing the valve toward its seat, said ymovable member being also biased toward said seat.

17. Safety apparatus for an internal combustion engine having a suction manifold and a fluid pump and served by a uid tank, comprising a hollow body, a movable member in said body dividing it into two compartments, one of which has a suction inlet communicating with the tank and an outlet communicating with the pump, the other compartment having a suction connection with said suction manifold, a valve closing towardsaid inlet, means between the movablev member and the valve normally biasing the valve toward its seat, said movable member being also biased toward the valve seat, means normally limiting the motion of the diaphragm toward said seat, and a lost-motion connection between the valve and said movable member whereby said member upon motion away from the seat may positively lift the valve away from its seat.

18. In safety apparatus for engines with intake manifolds and fuel pumps, a hollow body, a movable means in said body dividing it into two compartments, one of which compartments has a fluid inlet and a fluid suction outlet to a fuel pump, the other compartment having a suction outlet to a manifold, a valve biased to a seat inl` said fluid inlet, means to open the valve in response to suction in said outlet, a connection between the movable means and the valve, and means on the other side of said movable means adapted to actuate the movable meansto open said valve in response to vacuum from anl intake manifold.

19. In safety apparatus, a hollow body, a movable member in said body dividing it into two compartments one of which has a iiuid inlet and a iiuid suction outlet, a valve biased to a seat inwardly in said inlet, and adapted to be opened by the pressure of the movable member upon suction in said outlet, means in the compartment on the other side of the diaphragm adapted to move toward the movable member to open said valve, a cam for operating said last-named means, and suction means associated with the cam, eX- posed to intake manifold suction pressure.

20. In safety apparatus, a hollow body, a` flexible diaphragm in said body dividing it into two compartments, one of which has a fluid inlet and a suction outlet for liquid, a valve biased to a seat inwardly in said inlet, and adapted to be opened by the pressure of the diaphragm upon suction in said outlet means, a member in the compartment on the other side of the ydiaphragm adapted to move toward the diaphragm to open said valve, a cam for operating said member, and a piston associated with the cam, said piston being exposed to intake manifold suction` pressure to move the cam to force said member to open said valve.

21. In safety apparatus. a hollow body, a flexible diaphragm in said body dividing itvinto two compartments, one of which has a fluid inlet and a suction outlet for liquid, a valve biased to al seat inwardly in said inlet, and adapted to be opened by the pressure of the diaphragm upon suction in said outlet, a member in the compartment on the other side of the diaphragm adapted to move toward the diaphragm to open said valve, a cam for operating said member, and a piston associated with the member, said piston being exposed to intake manifold suction to move the 22. In safety apparatus, a hollow body, a exible diaphragm in said body dividing it into two compartments, one of which has a uid inlet and a suction outlet for liquid, a valve biased to a seat inwardly in said inlet, and adapted to be opened by the pressure of the diaphragm upon suction in said outlet, a member in the compartment on the other side of the diaphragm adapted to move toward the diaphragm to open said valve, a cam for operating said member, and a piston associated with the cam, said piston being exposed to intake manifold suction to move the cam so as to open said valve, air inlet means behind said piston and above the diaphragm, and means for cutting off said air inlet means at will and for depressing through said member to force the diaphragm Vto 'open said valve against its bias.

23. In safety apparatus, a hollow body, 'a flexible diaphragm dividing said hollow body into two compartments, one compartment having a liquid inlet and a liquid suction outlet, a valve normallyvbiased to a seat downstream in' said outlet, means associated with said diaphragm contacting said valve to open it upon depression of the diaphragm caused by suction in said outlet, a bifurcated piston in the compartment above the diaphragm which is concentric with the valve, a laterally operable piston. a cam associated therewith movable into the bifurcated piston to depress the same, said laterally operable piston being exposed to suction pressure in an intake manifold.

ORREN E. ZODER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2670761 *Aug 29, 1949Mar 2, 1954Albert FegelControl valve for fuel systems
US2680591 *Aug 23, 1947Jun 8, 1954Nellie ChurchmanFluid-pressure operated diaphragm valve
US2743552 *Nov 22, 1952May 1, 1956Edwin J HunterAutomatic irrigation devices
US2783019 *Jan 21, 1953Feb 26, 1957Alco Valve CoValve with non-chattering solenoid pilot valve control
US2855174 *Jan 25, 1956Oct 7, 1958De Garmo TheodoreAutomatic fuel supply cut-off device for engines
US2923321 *Jan 9, 1956Feb 2, 1960Paolo AloisiReserve device for gas cylinders
US3368538 *Nov 2, 1965Feb 13, 1968Pierburg Kg AFuel pump for motor vehicles
US3477466 *Apr 3, 1967Nov 11, 1969Sturm Lewis DElevator fluid control valve mechanism
US3877455 *May 11, 1973Apr 15, 1975Sentinel DistributorsEngine protective system
US3923425 *May 30, 1974Dec 2, 1975Acf Ind IncFuel pump shut-off valve
US3952719 *Mar 28, 1975Apr 27, 1976Borg-Warner CorporationVacuum pulse actuated fuel control valve
US3994357 *Jun 6, 1975Nov 30, 1976Colt Industries Operating CorporationSafety shut-off fuel system
US3994358 *Jun 6, 1975Nov 30, 1976Colt Industries Operating CorporationSafety shut-off fuel system
US4054116 *Apr 9, 1976Oct 18, 1977Chrysler CorporationEmergency fuel line closure
US4251226 *Dec 20, 1979Feb 17, 1981Yamato Sangyo Inc.Device for preventing backfire of inflammable gases
US4252094 *Apr 24, 1978Feb 24, 1981Brunswick CorporationAnti-syphon valve unit for marine fuel supplies apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/198.00D, 251/77, 123/198.0DB, 220/88.1, 251/251, 137/480, 123/510, 137/483
International ClassificationF01L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01L2710/006, F01L1/00
European ClassificationF01L1/00