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Publication numberUS2213703 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 3, 1940
Filing dateDec 13, 1938
Priority dateDec 13, 1938
Also published asUS2189314, US2231910
Publication numberUS 2213703 A, US 2213703A, US-A-2213703, US2213703 A, US2213703A
InventorsGeorge E Henning, Lila T Johnson, Thronsen Sigurd
Original AssigneeWestern Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cable-making apparatus
US 2213703 A
Abstract  available in
Images(11)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 3, 1940'. G. E. HENNING ET m.

CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS 13, 193s 11 sheets-sheet `1 yFilmed Dec.

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CABLEMAKING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 13, 1938 11 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept. 3, 1940 G.E.HENN1NG Er M.

CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS l1 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 13, 1938 /NVENTORS Sept. 3, 1940` G. E. HENNING er A1.

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CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS Filed DeC. 13, 1938 A TTORA/F Sept. 3, 1940. G. E. HENNING er m.

CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS l1 Sheets-Shouf 6 Filed Dec. 13, 1938 l Sept. 3, 1940. a. E. HENNING er AL, 2,213,703 n CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 13, 1938 11 Sheets-Sheet 7 DECS/i550 n H H fw www N5 A wmf J fm T.Y ,55B D Sept. 3, 1940. G. E. HENNING Er AL.

CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 13,- 1958 11ShectsSheet 8 Il H HH Il Il Il H IIJL INVENTOE'S GEHENN/NG F.' V JOHNSON- B y l a TTORNEY G. E. HENNING Er Ax.

CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS Filed Dec. 1s, 1938 Sept. 3, 1940.

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Sept. 3, 1940. G. E. HENNING Er AL 2,213,703

` CABLE-MAKING APARATUs Filed Dec. 15, 1939 11 snqgs-sheap 1o Sept. 3; 194);`

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CABLE-MAKING APPARATUS F1166; Das. 13 193s l. www-Sham ll v MV MEN T .www i w mm@ www@ `Patented Sept. 3, 1940` UNITED STATES PATE ortica ,l

2,213,703 y CABLE-MAKING ArPAmrros George E. Henning, Fallston, Md., Fred V. Johnson, deceased, late of Baltimore, Md., by Lila T. Johnson,

executrx, Baltimore, Md., and

Application December 13, 1938, Serial No. 245,540

10 Claims.

This invention relates to cable-making apparatus and more particularly to apparatus for making cable, which comprises a plurality' of wires held apart by insulators engaging the wires at spaced intervals. 4

Recent developments in the communications field have vindicated the desirability of providing cables for certain purposes comprised of a plurality of strands of conducting material spaced one from another and sheathed with a suitable covering without using a solid layer of dielectric between the strands but rather by providing washers or spacingv members placed at regularly spaced intervals throughout the length of the cable for holding the conducting strands in spaced relation.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a cable making apparatus for assembling wires and their insulating spacers in a predetermined relation with a high degree of accuracy.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, an apparatus for making a cable of four wires twisted with respect to each other and spaced one from another by spacers positioned throughout the length of the cable at predetermined intervals comprises four major -por tions, which are a Wire-feeding mechanism, a spacer and wire assembling mechanisms, a taping mechanism, and a twisting and takeup mechanism. In this embodiment of the invention, four reels of wire are positioned to be fed to an assembling apparatus by means of suitable guides which direct the wire into slots formed in spacers fed in a predetermined path by the spacer. and

' wire assembling mechanism. The spacer and wire assembling mechanism includes a hopper and a spacer-feeding device associated therewith v for feeding spacers one at a time into a chainlike spacer-carrying device which advances the spacers in their predetermined Aspaced relation while the wires are forced into slots in the spacers. At the end of the spacer and wire assembling fixture, micrometrically adjustable rolls are provided for forcing or rolling the wires a predetermined distance into the slots in the spacers and a set of guide members are provided for holding the wire and spacers in a predetermined plane during the assembly thereof The apparatus for sheathing the formed cable and for twisting the wires is positioned adjacent the wire and spacer assembling mechanism and comprises a series f taping heads and a twisting takeup head, which imparts a spiral twist to the assembled spacers and wires as they are fed through the taping mechanism. The taping mechanism during the passage of the wire therethrough applies paper tapes, a copper tape and two steel tapes to the cable as it is drawn to the twisting takeup head.

A better understanding of the invention may be had by reference to the following detailed description when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of thewire supply and spacer-assembling mechanism; y y

Fig. 2 is a plan View of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the taping mechanism and the twisting takeup mechanism, and when placed to the right of Fig. 2, discloses generally the entire plan View of the apparatus;

Fig. 4 is a side elevational view of the taping mechanism and the twistingtakeupghead and when placed to the right of Fig. 1, together with Fig. 1, discloses generally the side elevational View of the entire apparatus;

Fig. 5 is an'enlarged fragmentary side elevational view of the hopper and 'a portion of the spacer feeding mechanism, or in other words, that portion of the machine whichmay be seen when viewing the apparatus along the line 5-5 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows, parts of this figure being broken away to more clearly show the construction of the apparatus;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary vertical sctional View taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on th linel-l of Fig. 5 in the direction of the arrows showing some of the details of the construction of the hopper mechanism;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along the line 8-8 of Fig. 6 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along the line 9 9 of Fig. 8 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged fragmentary side eleva tional view of a portion of the wire and spacer assembling apparatus showing one of the micrometrically adjustable elements 'for setting a wire into the spacers, parts of the apparatus being broken away to conserve space, and the gure showing, on an enlarged scale, that portion of the apparatus which would be in view when looking in the direction of the arrows along the line Ill-l0 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 11 is a partial plan view of that part of the apparatus which may be seen looking in the direction of the arrows along the line II--ll of Fig. 10 inthe direction of the arrows;

Figs. 12 and 13 are fragmentary sectional views taken on.v the lines |2-I2 and |3-|3, respectively, 'of Fig. 10 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary side elevational view of theelements which force the Wires into the spacers if they have not been properly positioned bythe other wire setting elementsand l 'vshows those parts which may. be viewed along the line |4|4 of Fig. 2 in the direction ofthe arrows; Y

Figs. 15 and 16 are fragmentary sectional and plan views, respectively, taken along the lines |5|5 and |6-,|6, respectively, of Fig. 14 in the direction of the arrows;

lao

Figs. 1'1 and' 18 are enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional views. taken substantially along the lines |1-'-|1 and |8-|8,`respectively,'of Fig. 1 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 19 is an enlarged, side elevational view. partly 'in'section, of the paper tape serving mechanism showing the apparatus, which may be viewed' looking in the direction of the arrows i views, respectively, of portions of the taping heads for applying the copper and steel tapes, respectively, and are similar to the, structure shown in the right end of Fig. 19;

Fig. 22 is an enlarged fragmentaryside elevational view, partly in section, of the twisting takeup mechanism, as viewed along the line 22-22 of Fig. 3 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 23 is a fragmentary sectionalview taken along the line 23-23 of Fig. 22 in the direction of the-arrows;

Fig. 24v is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 24-24 of Fig. 22 in the direction of the arrows on a somewhat reduced scale;

Fig. 25 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional View taken on the line 25-25 of Fig. 23 in the direction of the arrows;

' Fig. 26 is a sectional View taken on the line 26--26 of Fig. 25 in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 27 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 21-21 of Fig. 23 in the direction of the arrows;`

Fig.v 28 is an enlarged View of the completed cable with part of the wrappings of paper, copper and steel partially unwound therefrom to illustrate the construction of the completedv cable; and

Fig. 29 is an enlarged partial sectional view tak en through the completed cable shown in Fig. 28, the section being enlarged and exaggerating the thickness of the tapes to more clearlyshow them.

Before referring in detail to the drawings, it will be noted that the detailed description of the structure shown thereon hasbeen divided into three parts in order to simplify the description thereof. These three parts vcomprise the wire and spacer assembling mechanism, the taping mechanism, and the 'twisting takeup mechanism.

In the drawings, which will now be discussed in detail, the same parts have been given the samefreference numerals throughout the several views` and the first part of the apparatus to be described is the wire and spacer assembling mechanism.A`

Wire and spacer assembling mechanism discs having slots 46, 4|, 42 and 43 formed there-l in into which the apparatus forcesthe wires 35, 36, y31 and38, respectively. rIn the drawings the slots 46,',4|, 42l and 43 have been'designated only in Fig. 29 since `the showing thereof in, all views.'`

would obscure some features of the apparatus. The wires 35, 36,31 and 438 are drawn in the operation of the machine from four supply spools 44, 45, 46 and 41 and directed through suitably tapered guides 48, 49, 56 and 5| to wire straightening devices 52, 53, 54 and 55, respecy tively. The supply spools 44, 45, 46 and 4-1 are shown in dot and dash lines in Figs. 1 and 2 and may be of any suitable type having caps 56, 51,58 and 59 positioned thereon for permitting the easyv Withdrawal of the operation of the apparatus. vAdiacent the supply spools 44, 45 and 46, there is a standard 66 which supports three arms 6|, 62 and 63, which have the guides 48, 49 and 56 mounted in the ends thereof andv which support the wire straightening devices 52, 53 and 54. The three spools 44, 45 and 46 and. their associated apparatus are mounted at the left end of the apparatus and direct the wire from the spools 44, 45 and 46 to the disc and wire assembling mechanism, the three wires 35, 36 and 31 being the bottom and two side wires of the cable while the wires and spacers are being assembled.

yThe hopper which 'feeds the spacers 38 into association with the 'wires 35, 36 and 31 is shown in detail in Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 and comprises a perforated barrel 15 mounted on a sleeve 16, which is, in turn, fixed to a stud shaft 11. A hollow standard 18 supports the Vstud shaft 11 andthe movable and stationary parts of the hopper mechanism. The sleeve 16 has three arms 19, 86 and 8| extending outwardly therefrom which constitute a spider for supporting a stationary ring 82 and a tube 83. An enlarged portion 84 formed integral with the sleeve 16 (Figs.

5, 6 and 7) has a slot 85 formed therein for rel with a passageway 91 formed in the stud shaftV 11, which in turn is interconnected with a passageway 98 leading into the hollow standard 18, which is, in turn connected to a suitable evacuating pump -(not shown) whereby a suction is applied through the standard 18, stud shaft 11 VandV arm 86' to the groove 95.

Rotatablyvmounted upon the stud shaft 11 is a collar |66 carrying on its left end a disc |6| of slightly smaller diameter than the stationary ring 82. This disc` |6| has a ring |62 fixed thereto by means of screws |63 and has a series of holes |64 equally spaced about4 its lefthand face `(Fig. 6) in alignment with the groove 95 in the stationary ring 82 so that as the disc |6| is rotated, as will be described hereinafter, the holes |64 will be brought into communication with the groove 95 and the'suction applied to the groove 95 will be also applied successively to the holes wire 'from the.Y spoolsby ythe .20

Each of the holes |04 extends partway through the ringl02 and into communication with a radially extending hole |05, of which there is one drilled from the inner edge of the ring |02 to communicate with each of the holes |04. Each of the holes |05 is positioned in the center of a depression |08 in the ring |02 and will tend to hold a spacer 39 in position in Ythe depression |08 as the ring |02 rotates. It will thus be apparent that the suction applied to the ring |02 will hold spacers 39, which have fallen into the depressions |08 by gravity, in the depression |08 as long as the holes |04 are in communication with the groove 95 in the stationaryring 82. The disc is driven in a clockwise direction (Figs. 5 and 8) by means of a sprocket ||0 (Fig.

6) fixed to the sleeve |00 and driven by a chain (Figs. 2 and 6) which is in turn actuated by a speed reducer ||2 driven from a motor ||3 shown in Fig. 1.

Mounted at the left end of the sleeve |00 is a vibrator disc ||4 having a series of depressions ||5 formed therein for cooperation with a. roller H5 mounted in a bearing ||1 which surrounds the tube B3. The tube 83 will thus be vibrated against the pressure of the spring 81 and any of the spacers 39 which fall into the tube will be shaken lto cause them to assume a at position in the bottom of the tube. The bottom end of the tube 83 is pivotally mounted in a guide member ||8 fixed to the stationary ring 82 and the upper end of the tube has a trough |9 mounted thereon for receiving spacers which have been carried by the ring |02 from the bottom of the hopper to the top thereof, the suction applied through the slot 95 serving to hold the spacers on the ring |02 while they are carried through that portion of the rotation of the ring |02, where gravity would tend to draw them out of the depressions |08. It will be noted, by reference to Fig. 5, that the groove 95 extends from a point just below the point where the parts would tend to fall out of the ring |02 to a point directly above the trough i|9 so that the spacers picked up by the ring |02 at the bottom of the hopper will be carried to the top thereof and into position over the trough H9 where the suction on the spacers will be relieved due to the holes |04 moving out of association with the arcuately shaped groove 95. The face of the perforated barrel has a relatively large opening therein through which parts may be placed in the hopper and a cover plate |2| is provided for closing this opening.

Rotatably mounted on the sleeve |00 (Fig. 6) is a disc |30, which is somewhat larger in size than the disc |0I, and which has a rim |3| extending outwardly therefrom and surrounding the ring |02. The peripheral edge of the disc has gear teeth |32 formed thereon whereby the disc |30 is driven in a counterclockwise direc tion (Figs. 5 and 8) and the rim i3| has a brake band |33 almost completely surrounding it for applying a drag to the disc |30 so that its rotation will be smooth and in timed relation to the driving of other apparatus, to be described hereinafter. Positioned on the left face (Fig. 6) of the rim |3| and held in place thereon by the screws |34 is a spacer advancing and tilting assembly designated generally by the numeral |35.

The assembly |35 comprises a ring |36, L shaped in cross section, and having a series of apertures |31 equallyspaced about its horizontally extending arm. These apertures |31 are slightly larger in diameter than the diameter of ring the spacers 39. A spacer ring |39 is seated in the angle formed by the junction of the two arms of the L-shaped ring |36 and has cooperating therewith a iiat ring |39, rectangular `in cross section, through which the screws v|34 extend.,

The flat ring |39 andthe spacer rings |38 have interposed between them aplurality of spacer tilting members |40, which areflat on two sides and rounded on their other surface; and which are so mounted as to be in substantial alignment with the apertures |31. The spacertilting inembers are provided with pins for-holding them in place between the at ring |39 and the spacer |38 and some ofthem have. apertures through which the screws |34 extend. The ring |36 is of such diameter that its horizontally extending arm will just engage the lower endiofv the guide member ||8 as the ring is rotated. The

portion of the horizontally extending arm of the* ring |36, which engages the undersurface oiffthe.

guide member l I8, is of such thickness that' spacers 39 in the guide member H8, which incidentally is provided with a window |42, will drop one I a.

at a time into-the apertures |31'in thering |35.

A plate |43 is positioned to engage therouter suri face of the ring |36 for a shortdistance adjacent the guide member ||6 and supports the spacers 39 while they are in the apertures |31. It. will thus be apparent that spacers f3.9' will d-igptrom the guide member H8 onto the plate N3 each time an aperture |31 comes in direct alignment with the open end of the guide member ||8 and that spacers will thusrbe drawn from the bottom of the pile in the guide member 8{orie'at a time and will be moved along the plaftei'f'i-until they reach its right end (Fig. 8), where they will dropx on the plate |43 and into position between the adjacent spacer tilting membersl |40. .As the spacers 39 fall ontothe spacer tilting members, they will strike the rounded face .thereof and be tilted to a substantially'vertical position and will be prevented from falling through the space be# tween the mung members by a guide pme m,

until they have been carried to the right end of the guide plate (Fig. 8), where they will be permitted to drop from their position between the tilting members.

The disc |30 is driven by a gear `=,|50, which meshes with the gear teeth |32 formed on the periphery of the disc and the gear |50'Iis mounted upon a shaft |5|, which also carries an idler sprocket |52. The idler sprocket |52-supports a carrier chain |53, which serves to carry the spac ers 39 while they are being assembled with the wires 35, 36, 31 and 38. The carrier chain |53 comprises a plurality of links |54 anfd |55, which are substantially U-shaped in configuration, as

may be seen by reference to Fig. 9'. and are interconnected by pins |56. All ofQthe links |54 and |55 have upwardly extending projections y|51 in each of which there ijs formed a slot |58i`or receiving the wire 35. projections |51 formed on the links |54 and |55 cooperate to provide spaced-apart portions between each pair of links wherein the spacers 39 The upwardlygextending may be carried throughfthe spacer andwire as-f" sembling section of themachine. The links |54 are somewhat larger'in cross section than the` links and have 'projecting ears |59 which exy tend over projecting ears |60 formed on the links Positioned within each pair of projecting |54. ears |60 is a roller |6|, which engages in the teeth of sprocket |52 and rides on a'platel |62 after they leave the sprocket. The plate |62 is positioned between a pair ofspa'cer plates y|63 .porting plates |65 and 66 have the shaft |.5|

journalled therein and also support a tie bar I1 to which the brake band |33 is tied by means of a brake rod |12, one end of which is fixed to the tie bar |1| and the other end of which extends through .the tie bar and is normally held taut on the rim |3| by means of a coil spring |13 surrounding the end of the rod |12 and interposed between a nut |14 on the rod and the tie bar |1|.

vThe supporting plate |65 also supports the plates |43'and |44, the plate |44 being formed integral with a bracket |15 which is fixed to the plate |65 and has an extending portion |16 on which the plate |43 is mounted. The left end (Figs. 1, 2 and 5) of the supporting plates |65 and |66 have a wire guide |85 mounted thereon for directing the strand of wire 35 into the slots |58 in the links of the carrier chain.

Since the idler sprocket |52 and the disc |38 are geared together, it is believed that it will be apparent that the spacer advancing and tilting assembly |35 will be rotated in timed relation to the movement of the carrier chain |53. Reference to Fig. 8 will make it clear that the spacers 39, which are dropped into the space between the i spacer tilting members |48, will be carried along `n the guide plate |44 until they come to the end of the plate |44 and thereafter will drop o the plate |44 into the slots between ythe links on the carrier chain |53. Since the assembly |35 and chain |53 are driven -in synchronism, one spacer 39 Will be dropped in each slot between the links of, the carrier chain and will rest on the wire 35, which is in the slots |58 in the links |54 and |55, a pair of guide members |86 and |81 being provided for holding the spacers 39 against movement to the right or left (Figs. 6 and 9) and a pair of guide members |88 and |89 being provided for guiding the carrier chain during its movement. The guide members |86 and |81 are mounted on the guide members |88 and |89, respectively, which are in turn positioned on top of the supporting plates |65 and` |66. The spacers thus deposited in the carrier chain Will be moved to the right (Figs. 1, 2, and 8) past a brush |98, which is rotated at relatively high speed by means of a belt |9| driven from the speed reducer ||2 (Figs. 2 and 5). The brush |98 is mounted upon a bracket |92 which is secured to the plate |65 and extends over the guide members |86 and |81. The brush |98 is rotated at right angles or obliquely to the direction of travel of the carrier chain `and will thus spin the spacers in the chain until one of the slots in the spacer engages the Wire 35 and the spacer drops down away from the brush.

A blast of air delivered from a jet, such as is shown at |93, may be directed to the periphery of the spacers to supplement the brush |98 or the brush |98 may be omitted and the jet |93 connected to a suitable source of air under pressure may be used to rotate the spacers until the bottom slot in the spacer engages with the wire 35.

The blast of air will also remove any foreign matter from the surfaces of the spacers.

As the spacers are carried to the right by the carrier chain |53, and after they have passed the brush, any spacer which was not properly seated on thewires 35, that is, any spacer which did not have one of its slots brought into registry with the Wire 35, will be lraised up above the top of the guide members |86 and |81, and as itmoves forward, it will engage the underside of a bar |95 (Fig. 10) which is slidable vertically on a bridge member |96 and'a pair of bridge members |98 and |99. The bar |95 is heldin the bridge members by means of a pair of pins 288 and 28| set in the bridge member |96 and in the bridge members |98 and |99, respectively, and engaging in'slots 282 and 283, respectively, in the bar |95. The bridge member |96 is mounted upon the guide members |86 and |81 and extends upwardly and over the carrier chain with the spacers on it, whereas the bridge members |98 and |99 are mounted on shouldered plates |83 and |84, which are in turn xed to the supporting plates |65 and |66/The`v bridge member |96 has a block of insulating material 285 mounted thereon which carries a contact 286 adapted to be engaged by a contact 281 mounted on the bar |95 if the bar |95 is moved upwardly by a spacer not properly placed on the carrier chain. If the spacers 39, as they pass the bar |95, are in the proper position, an extending portion 288 of thebar will register with a slot in the spacer, as shown in Fig. 12. However, if any spacer happens to be turned out of its normal position and the wire 35 is not in one of the slots, the spacers will raise the bar |95, thereby to cause a circuit to be completed between the contacts 286 and 281 to establish other circuit connections (not shown) for stopping the machines and notifying the operator, by either an audible or visible signal, of the reason for the machine stopping. The bridge members |98 and |99 are bolted together by machine screws 2|8 and serve another purpose, that is, they cooperate with a substantially triangularly shaped member 289 interposed between,

them to serve as a guide for the wire 38.

Positioned closely adjacent the right end (Fig. l0) of the bridge members |98 and |99 and the triangularly shaped member 289 is the rst pres-.

sure roll 228, of a series of pressure rolls, which serves to force the wire 38 firmly into the slots in the spacers 39. As may be seen, by reference to Figs. 19 and 17, the pressure roll 228 has a reduced section 22| at its periphery, which extends into the uppermost slot in the spacers 39 and will force the wire 38 down into the slot. The pressure roll is mounted upon a shaft 222 formed integral with a block 223 fixed in a plate 224, which is dove-tailed, as shown at 225, in a plate 226, which in turn is secured to a mounting bracket 221. 'I'he bracket 221 is suitably. fixed to the supporting plate |66 and supports the plate 226, which has a hollow central portion 228 through which a screw 229 extends. Fixed to the upper end of the screw 229 is a knurled handle 238 having a reduced portion 23| on which there are suitably inscribed markings for indicating the degree of rotation of the screw 229 with respect to the block 223 in which it is threaded. The markings on the reduced portion 23| cooperate with a reference mark on a 'collar 232, which is keyed in the plate 226 by means of a tapered pin 233, and cooperates with a shoulder 234 formed on the screw 229 to hold the screw xed against vertical movement. A set screw .235 is threaded into the collar 232 and may be set against the shank of the screw 229 to hold it in any one of its adjusted positions. It is believed to be apparent, by reference to Figs. 10 and 1'1, that rotation of the screw 229 will change the position of the pressure roll 220 with respect to the spacers 39 carried by the carrier chain |53.

A pair of brackets 245 and 246 are mounted on the supporting plates |65 and |66 and adjustably support pressure rolls 241 and 248, respectively. These two pressure rolls are identical in construction with the pressure roll 220 and serve to accurately position the wires 36 and 31 in the slots in the spacers 39 as the spacers are moved past them.

The wires 36 and 31 (Figs. 10 and 11) are passed through slots 249 and 250 in the shouldered plates |83 and |84, respectively, and the plates |83 and |84 have air passages 25| and 252 formed therein connected to a suitable source of air under pressure by pipes 253 and 254, respectively. The air under pressure passing through the passages 25| and 252 is directed by a pair of jets 255 and 256 onto spacers carried by the carrier chain |53 so that the spacers will be forced against the right-hand links |54 and |55 as the spacers move into association with the presser roll 220, whereby the spacers, in being forced onto their associated wires, will be `spaced equal distances one from another. The assembled wires and spacers will continue to move to the right as the carrier chain |53 advances, and in so moving to the right, will arrive at the position shown in detail in Figs. 14 and 15, where the si'de slots in the spacers are engaged by two stabilizing fins 260 and 26| mounted on the supporting plates |65 and |66. These stabilizing fins will restrain the spacers against movement vertically as they are moved to the right in a horizontal plane and will carry them past a sensing device, designated generally by the numeral 262 which comprises an L-shaped sensing finger 263 pivotally mounted on a bridge 264 which is carried by the supporting plates |65 and |66. The sensing finger 263 is pivoted on the bridge 264 and has a horizontally extending sur-1 face 265 which engages the upper surface of the spacers as they pass by and this surface 265 is of sufflcient'length to span a little more than two of the'spacers in position in the carrier chain. If a spacer is missing from the group strung on the four wires, the sensing finger 263 will tilt in a clockwise direction to bring a contact 266, mounted upon its vertically extending portion, into engagement with a fixed contact 261 to establish circuit connections, not shown, which will cause the machine to stop and indicate the condition which exists.

Shortly after the assembled wires and spacers pass the sensing finger 263, the carrier chain will start to recede from the spacers due to the fact that the upper surface of the plate |62 slopes downwardly, as shown at 268. As soon as the carrier chain |53 has moved downwardly from the spacers a sufficient distance so that it will not disturb their spacing in the manner just described, the chain passes onto its driving sprocket 269, which is mounted upon a shaft 210 extending outwardly from a speed reducer 21| (Fig. 2). The speed reducer 21| is mounted upon a platform 212 and isl driven by means of a chain drive 213 from a main drive shaft 214. Reference to the right end of Figs. 1 and 2 and the left end of Fig. 3 shows that the main drive shaft 214 is geared to an auxiliary drive shaft 215, which is in turn driven by a main driving motor 216. The motor 216 is mounted on the left end of a supporting framework 211, at the left end of which (Figs. 1 and 2) there are a pair of upright standards 219 and 280. 'Ihe upright'standard 219 is xed to and supports the supporting plate |65 and the standard 280 supports the supporting plate |66. Both of the supporting plates |65 and |66 extend to the right a short distance beyond the standards 219 and 280 (Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 14) and have mounted thereon brackets 28|, 282, 283 and 284, which support four pressure rolls 285, 286, 281 and 288, which are identical in construction with the pressure roll 220, and which are supported in exactly the same manner on their associatedbrackets as was the pressure roll 220 on its bracket 221. As will be apparent, by reference to Figs. 1, 2, 3, 14, 16 and 18, the pressure rolls 285 and 286 and pressure rolls 201 and 288 are mounted to engage the wires at diametrically opposed points so that the wires will be set into the spacers an accurately measured and equal distance. From the pressure rolls 285, 286, 281 and 288 the assembled wires and spacers are di. rected to the taping mechanism.

Taping mechanism The taping mechanism includes three taping heads, designated generally by the numerals 300, 30|, and 302, which are substantially identical in construction and which apply two gap type paper tapes 303, one overlapping copper tape 304, and two gap type steel tapes 305, respectively, to the assembled spacers and wires. The only difference between the various taping heads lies in the dimensions of the guides which direct the layers of material to the assembled wires and spacers and therefore only the taping head 300 will be described in detail. Extending upwardly from the` supporting framework 211, are. three inverted V shaped standards 306, 301 and 308, which are formed from channel members and suitable gusset plates and which bridge the framework 211 and extend upwardly therefrom to support the heads 300, 38| and 302, respectively. Mounted in the standard 306 is a tubular bearing member 309 which has a shoulder 3|0 for engaging one side of the standard 306 and which is threaded at 3H to receive a locking member 3|2 whereby the bearing 309 will be locked in position in the standard 306. A tubular head supporting member 3|3 is rotatably mounted upon the bearing 309 and has keyed thereto a sprocket 3|4 adapted to be driven by a chain 3|5, which is in turn driven'by the auxiliary drive shaft 215.

- 'Ihe head supporting member 3|3 has a flanged portion 320, on which are mounted a pair of brackets 32| and 322, the bracket 32| being mounted directly on the ange 320 and the bracket 322 being spaced therefrom by means of a block 323. The brackets 32| and 322 have adjustable tape reel supporting members 324 and 325, respectively, mounted thereon. 'Ihe tape reel supporting members 324 and 325 are adjustable angularly with respect to the brackets 32| and 322 so that the angle at which the tapes 303 are fed from their reels 326 may be adjusted to control the angle of feed thereof to the assembled spacers and'wires. Also mounted upon the flange 320 is a substantially rectangular plate 330, which has a collar 33| fixed therein by means of screws 332. The collar 33| has a tubular member 333 xed therein by means of set screws 334 threaded in the collar 33| and engaging the outer surface of the tubular member 333. At its left end (Fig. 19) the tubular member S33-carries an insulating bushing 335 having an annular member 336 fixed to its outer end for cooperation With a brush 331 mounted upon the locking member 3|2. The bushing 335 has an aperture 338 formed therein throughfwhich an insulated wire 339 passes for connection yto the annular member 336. l 'Ihis wire 3 39 is wrapped around the tubular member 333 and extends through a slot 340 formed in the collar 33|. -Mounted in the tubular member 333 and fixed thereto, by means of a set screw 34|, is a .guide supporting tube 342 around which the insulated wire 339 is wrapped and to which there is fixed an annular insulating bushing 343 The guide supporting tube 342 has a pair of rounded slots 344 formed therein and extending a substantial distance from the right end (Fig. 19) of the tube. There is a shouldered guide member 345, formed vof two semi-circular halves, inserted into the right end (Fig. 19) of the tube 342 and having an internal diameter just slightly larger than the wires and spacersy with' the servings of paper tape 303 thereon. The member 345 is held in place in the end of the tube by a ring 346 surrounding the tube and compressing it against the member 345, set screws 353 being threaded in the ring 346 to compress the tube 342 on the guide member 345. Fixed tothe tube 342 intermediate the ring 346 and the insulating bushing 343 are a pair of guide sleeves 341 and 348 which surround the tube and have rounded guide surfaces 349 and'350 and35| and 352, respectively, which engage the edges of the paper tapes 303 to properly guide them into the rounded slots 344, from which they are directed to the assembled' spacers and wires and are 4wrapped around the assembly, as shown in Fig.` 21. Each of the guide members 341 and 348 has four pins 355, 356, 351 and 358 mounted on the outer ends thereof and these pins are adaptedv to'reeive control levers 359 and 360. It will be noted, by reference to Figs. '19, 20 and 21, that the control levers are pivoted on the pins 355 and 358 and are urged toward the pins 356 and 351 by the paper tapes 303 when the tapes are in the positionshownv in Figs. 19, 20 and 21. one of the tapes 303 breaks, the weight of the lever associated with the broken tape will cause A 'the lever to rock about its pivot pin 355 or 358 andcause an extending portion 36| to engage with an annular metallic member 362 mounted on the, insulating bushing 343 and electrically 'connected tothe wire 339.-A The-levers 359 and 360 are'in conducting engagement with the frame of the apparatus in their normal positions, and since the wire 3391s insulated from the frame of the apparatus, the engagement of the extending portion- 36| of one of the levers 359 or 360 `with the conducting ring 362 will close a circuit through the frame of the apparatus to the brush 331 to establish a circuit, not shown, which will stop the machine and indicate that a tapehas broken.

` In Figs. 2l-A and 21-B, the taping guides for vapplying the overlapping'copper tape and the two spaced steel tapes have been shown in some detail, the same reference numerals being vused as were 'used in Fig. 19 for the paper tape guides but being given the exponents A and B in Figs. 21-A and 21-B, respectively. Y It will be noted that there is only one copper tape applied td-the "cable and that this tape is applied -in an overlapping relation, the guide members and control members being substantially the same as those disclosed in FigQ 19 for thev application of paper tape. I n like manner, Fig. 2l-B illustrates the guide members and control mechanism for the two steel tapes.

It will be understood that as soon as the assembled wires and spacers leave the last pressure However, if

Takeup mechanism As pointed out in the brief description ofthe drawings, the twisting takeup mechanism is shown in general in Figs. 3 and 4 and in detail in Figs. 22 to 27; to which reference will now be made. The takeup mechanism comprises a cradle 315, which has a tubular projection 316 extending to the left therefrom (Fig. 22) on which the entire cradle and ,its associated parts are-mounted. The tubular-projection 316 is mounted to rotate within a bearing 311 mounted upon a standard 318. The left end (Fig. 22)' of the pr`ojection'316 has a guide member 319 threaded therein for guiding the completed cable, designated 380, to a takeup reel 38| on the cradle y315. v Fixed to the cradle'315 is a sprocket 382 adapted to be driven by a chain 383. The chain 383, inthe embodiment of the invention shown, is driven yby a sprocket mounted on the end of a shaft l384 (Fig. 3) suitably journalled in the supporting framework 211. The shaft 384 carries, at its left end (Fig. 3), a gear 385, which meshes with a gear 386 mounted on a shaft 381, which is geared to the main drive shaft 214 by means of gears 388 and 389.- The driving-connection justv described will rotate the entire cradle 315-in one direction to impart a twist to the cable 389'. If it. is desired to twist the cable-in the opposite direction, the shaft 384 may bek shifted to th'eposition in which the shaft 381 is now shown and the shaft 381 eliminated, whereby the cradle 315 will be rotated in the opposite direction.. Any suitable chain tightening device may be used for tightening the chain 383 on its sprocket 382 to compensate for theshifting of the shaft 384 from one position to another, as just described.

Rotatable on the outer surface of the bearing 311 (Figs. 22 and 24) is a brake drum 390 which has cooperating therewith a pair of brake shoes 39| and 392 mounted intermediate the ends of pivoted brake arms 393 and 394, respectively. The brake arms are pivoted at 395 and 396 ad- -jacent their lower ends and are connected at their upper ends to a pair of sleeves 391 and 398, respectively. The sleeve.398 is held on the end of a brake rod 399 by means of a pair of nuts 400 and 40|, and the sleeve 391 is slidable on theV brake rod 399, which is threaded at its left end (Figs. 23 and 24) to receive a threaded hand wheel 402 between which and the sleeve 391 there Yis interposed a coiled spring403 encircling the Awhich is fixed in an aperture 408 in the'cradlel 3.15. Thel bearing block 401 carries a normally 'unusedv4 idler gear 409 having relatively wide teeth 4|0, which,` as shown in Fig. 25, 'are out of mesh with the gear 405, which, as shown in Fig. 22, vmeshes-with the ring gear 404. The vidler 409 is mounted upon a stud shaft'4|| fixedin the bearing block 401 and serves no purpose when it is mounted as shown in-Figs-22 and in mesh with the teeth of the gear 409 and the' teeth 4|0 of the gear 409 will be in mesh with the ring gear 404. From the foregoing, it is believed to be apparent that regardless of the direction of twist imparted tothe cable, the shaft 406 will be rotated in the same, direction if the proper gear changes are made.

Carried bythe shaft 406 (Fig. 25) von thevend opposite the end on which the lgear 405 is mounted, is a kbeveled gear, 420, which meshes with a pair of beveled gears 42| and 422 rotatable in a transmission housing 423. The gear 42| is keyed to a'shaft-424j and has formed on its left face (Fig. 25) a toothed clutch 425,. which, as shown, is in engagement with a clutch member 426 slidably keyed to the end of a shaft 421, which is journalledln and freely rotatable in the gear 422. The clutch member-.425 has formed on its left. end clutch teeth 428 adapted to cooperate with the teeth of. a clutch 429 formed on-v the right-hand face (Fig. 25) -of the gear 422 when the clutch member 4,25 is shifted to the left '.(Fig. 25), The shaft 424 drives the takeup reel 38| through a roller chain 430, which meshes with a sprocket 43| secured to a collar 432 (Figs. 23 and 27). Theshaft 424 is square in the area thereof surrounded by the collar 432 and is engaged by four rollers 453-433, which are rotatable in the collar 432 so that the collar will slide freely. along .the shaft 424, as the cable v380 is distributed. on the reel 39|. The sprocket 43| and its supporting collar 452 are mounted Within a casing 434, ilxedto a reel supporting frame composed of angle members 435, 435, 431 and 438. 'Iheanglemembers 435 and 436, as shown in Fig. 22, are irregularin shape and extend outwardly to the right from the angle members 431 and 438 to provide a pair of vertically disposed surfaces 439 and 440 (Figs. 3, 4, 22`and23) on which reel journal blocks 444 and 445, respectively, are mounted. Rotatably mounted in the reeljournal blocks 444 and 445 are a pair of bearings 44B and 441, respectively, having a reel supporting screw 440 mounted therein. The screw 448 is provided with an enlarged portion 449, which tapers, as shown in 450, to a smaller diameter, as shown in 45|. The tapered portion 450 ofthe screw 448 is adapted to engage in an aperture 452 in one head of the reel 38| and the portionl45| of the screw 445 y is shown threaded at 455 to engage a correspondingly threaded portion in the bearing 441. The bearing 441 carries a iinger 454 adapted to engage in an aperture 455 inthe other head of the reel 33|, whereby the reel 34| may be fixed to the bearings'446 and 441. l

The right end (Fig. 23) of the bearing 441 has a sprocket 460 rotatable thereon and provided with a clutch face 46|, which is normally engaged by ya cooperating clutch face 452 formed on a collar 463 formed integral with a hand wheel 454. The collar 453 is normally urged to the left (Fig. 23) by a series 'oi coil springs 455 seated in pockets in the collar and abutting a hand 'wheel 455. Adjacent their peripheries,

' rotate together.

the hand wheels 454 and 460 have radially extending plates ,461 and 463 'welded vto them and the hand Wheel 465 has an axially extending ring 409 i'lxed to it for supporting' coil springs 410 in the space between adjacent 'platesf451 and 458, whereby the two hand wheels will be urged to The springs 465' normallyv hold the clutch face 452 in engagement with the clutch face 45| so'that the rotation of the sprocketl, by the chain 430, will drive the hand Wheel464 and the springs 410 interposed between theplates 461 and 468 will tend to drive the hand wheel 455 with the sprocket. .The hand wheel 456 isfixed to the bearing 441 and therefore the sprocket. `460 will resiliently drive the bearing 441 to rotate the ,reel 39|. Suitable markings are placed on the hand wheels 454 and 465 and the tension on the brakeshoes 39| and 392 on thebrake drum 390 'mayy be regulated .to drive the ,takeup` reel 38| under the desired tension", as indicated by the displacement ofthe handwheel 46,4,with respect to the hand wheel 456.

Mounted inthe bottom end of the casing 4544, as shown in Figs. 23 and 2'1, is a block 480 having theconguration at its left end (Fig. 21) of half a nut, that is, half a thread is formed in the lblockr 480 to'cooperate with a'screw 40|.' The block 4804s provided with a handle 482, whereby it may be withdrawn from engagement with the screw 48| provided a springfpressed plunger 483 has been withdrawn from asocket 484 in the block 480. 'Thescrew 48| is journalled in a side member-.485 and a side member 425 of the cradle 315 and carries on its left end (Fig. 23 )`a gear. 481, which meshes with a gear 488 mounted .on me shaft 421.

. The side members 485 and 486 of vthe cradle 315 are joined together at their upper ends by an angle member 41| and they are joined together at their bottom ends by another angle member 412. The angle members 41| and 412 have track members 413 and 414, respectively, fixed to them for engagement by rollers 415-415 rotatably mountedon the angle members 431 and 439 of .the reel supporting frame. As shown in Figs. 22

and 23, two rollers 415 engage a horizontal sur- 'face of the track member 413, two rollers 415 engage a vertical surface of the track 413, two rollers `engage a vertical surface of the track member 414 and two rollers engage a horizontal suriace'of the track member 414. From the foregoing, it is believed to be apparent that the reel supporting frame may be slid backend forth on the cradle 315 to move the reel 38| mounted thereon back and forth with respect to the guide, member 319 to distribute the cable 390 on the reel 30|.

As shown in Fig. 25, the shaft 421 is connected through the clutch member 425 to the gear 42|,

whereby the reel supporting frame he driven,

to the left (Fig. 23) and this drive of theyreel supporting frame to the left (Fig. 23) will continue until the angle member 430 engages a collar 454 iixed to a shaft 49| and slidable in the transmission housing 423. The collar 490 is pinned to the shaft 49| at 492 and a corresponding collar 495 isv pinned to the shaft 49| at 494. 'The collars 490 and .493 have pockets 495 and 498 formed therein in which coilfsprings 491 and 49S,- respectively, are seated. 4rThe coil springs 451 and 495 abut a shoulder 455 formed on a sleeve 550, which is slidable on the shaft 49|.

The collar 455 has an extension 55| formed thereon which enters a slot 552 in a ring 593 xed to the clutch member 425. A pair of latches but also drives the shaft |5| through the idler 504 and 505 (Fig. 26) cooperate with the collar 499 to hold it in either of two positions, being urged into engagement with the collar by coil springs 506 and 501, respectively.

The just described mechanism comprises what is commonly known as a loadand re mechanism, which/will' hold the clutch member 426 in engagement'with either the clutch face 425 or the clutch face 429, into whichl positions the clutch member will be moved by the snap action of the springs when the collar 490- or the collar 493 engages the angle members 435 or 436. When the clutch member 426 is moved from engagement with the clutch face 425 into engagement )5 with the clutch face 429, the direction o f rotation of the screw 48| will be reversed and the screw will continue to rotate in said reversed direction until the load and fire mechanism is reversed again by the forcing of the shaft 49| in; the

120 oppositt direction, whereupon the direction of 30 41 and threaded through the machine to the reel 38| and fixedto the reel in any suitable manner, -a supply of spacers 39 having been placed in the perforated barrel, and reels of paper, cop- `per and steel tapes having been placed on the $5 taping heads 308, 30| and 302, the motors H3 and 21G'may be started to initiate the operation ofthe machine. The motor H3 will rotate the ring |02 and the ring will pick up spacers 39 from the bottom .of the barrel and carry them up '40 to the trough l |9, where they will be dropped into thetube 83. The motor H3 will also cause the tube 83 to vibrate through the engagement of the roller H6 with the depressions H5 on the vibrator disc H4, whereby the spacers carriedffrom 45 the bottom of the barrel 15 up to the trough H9 willbe arranged in an orderly pile in the tube 83. The means for vibrating the tube 83 illustrates one form of device that may be used, but it will be understood that an velectrical coil. vibrator or 50 any other suitable device may be used.

Spacers which have been piled up in the tube 83 will pass downwardly through the tube and assume the position shown in Fig. 8, where they are restingr on the plate |43. As the motor 216 is l '55 started, the carrier chain |53 will start to advance, the drive for the carrier chain being supplied from the motor 216 through the main drive shaft 215 and auxiliary drive shaft 214, the chain 213 and speed reducer 21| to the main driving 30 sprocket 269.v The carrier chain |53 not only serves to advance the spacers 39 which it carries,

sprocket |52, which meshes with the carrier chain |53. The gear |50, which is mounted on the I .65 shaft 15|, drives the disc |30 and the spacers,

f vwhich are fed downwardly through tube 83 tothe plate |43, will be picked off the plate |43 one at a time by the ring |36, rotating in timed relation tothe drive of the carrier chain, and the spacers v70-fwhich are picked oi'the plate |43 will drop through the apertures |31 in the ring |36 and will fall into the space between adjacent spacer tilting members |46, where they will rest on their edges on the upper surface of the guide plate |44 un- 75 til they reach the end of the guide plate and drop rtwo layers of steel tape.

into the slots between the links |54 and |55 of the carrier chain |53. The brake band |33, ln retarding the motion of the disc |30, will also take up any slack which there may be in the carrier chain |53 and insure that the space between the spacer tilting lmembers |40 and the space between adjacent links |54 and |55 are in proper alignment so that the spacers will drop on of the plate |44 and into space between the projections |51 on the links.

Asy the carrier chain advances to the right, it will carry the spacers, which have dropped off the guide plate |44, to the right into association with the/brush |98, driven by the motor |33, where the spacers will be spun by the brush |90 and the blast of air from the jet |93 or if the brush is not used, then by the blast of air until a slot in the spacer is engaged by the wire 35 and the spacers which will stop the machine and notify an'ropera` tor of the condition which exists.`

A continued movement of the spacers 39 and lthe wires and 38 to the right' will bring them `into that portion of .the machine illustrated in Fig. 11 where the blast of air from the jets 255 and 256 will force the spacers to the right against the upwardly extending projections |51 on the links to the right of the spacers (Fig. 11i) just prior to the time when the wires 36 and 31 are guidedr into the side slots in the spacers by the pressure rolls 241 and 248. lAs the carrier chain |53 continuesto carry the assembled spacers and wires ,to the right,'the spacers will arrive at the position shownin Fig. 14, where the stabilizing fins 266 and 26| engage the side slots in the spacersand where the chain` |53 recedesfrom the spacers, and as the spacers pass through this position, the sensing device 262 will determine whether the partially formed cable has arrived at this position with a spacer missing, and if a spacer is missing, the sensing finger 263 will tilt in a clockwise direction to move contact 266 into engagement with contact 261 to establish a circuit condition stopping the machine and notifying the operator that a spacer is missing from the assembly.

The assembled `wires 35, 36, 31 and 38 and spacers 39 are advanced, from the point where the carrier chain |53 moves out of engagement with the spacers, by the twisting takeup mechanism and they will be drawn through the pressure rolls 285, 286, 281 and 288, which have been micrometrically adjusted, so that-the wires will be forced into the slots in the spacers the desired distance, and as soon as the assembled wires and spacers move out of association with the pressure rolls 285, 286, 281 and 288, the twist will start to be imparted to the assembly while the assembly is passing through the taping mechanism.

In thetaping mechanism, there are provided the three taping heads 30|, 302 and 303, which apply two layers of paper tape, a single layer of copper tape applied in overlapping relation, and The taping heads are rotated about the assembled wires and spacers by from' the auxiliary drive shaft 215 instead of from the main drive shaft 214, and by driving the tapvingl heads 300 and 302 from the main drive shaft 214, rather than from the main auxiliary drive shaft 215. If one of the tapes being applied to the assembled spacers and wires breaks, its associatedcontrol lever 359 or 360 will be released and 4will move its extending portion 36| into engagement with the annular members 362 to complete', a'circ'uit from the frame of the machine "through the lever which has been released and the v.wire 339 and brush 331 to establish a circuit which-will indicate that a tape has broken.

,The reelY cradle 315, which is rotated by means of the chain 383 ineither of two directions, depending upon whether the shaft 384 is in the position shown or in the position now shown occupied by the shaft 381, rotates within the bearing 311 and as the cradle revolves, it carries with it the shaft 406, which carries the gear 405 in mesh with the ring gear 404. The ring gear 404, being fixed to the brake drum 390, will be permitted to rotate only when there is a predetermined tension on the cable 380 and therefore, if the brake shoes 39| and 392 were released from the brake drum 390, the brake drum and ring gear 404 would be free to rotate and no motion would be imparted to the takeup reel 38|. However, when brake pressure is applied to the brake drum 390, there will be a speed variation between the drum 390 and the cradle 315, whereby the gear 405 will proceed to walk about the ring gear 404, rotating the shaft 406 and rotating the takeup reel through the beveled gears 420 and 423, shaft 424 and chain 430 driven from the shaft 424.

The tension under which the cable is drawn through the machine will be indicated by the relative displacement of the hand wheels 464 and 466 in the following manner. The reel 38| is driven by the sprocket 460, the clutch face 46| of which meshes with the clutch face 462 on the collar 463 formed integral with the hand wheel 464, which is in turn connected through the springs 410 to the hand wheel 466 xed to the bearing 441, on which the reel is secured. As tension increases on, the cable being drawn through the machine, the hand wheels 464 and 466 will be displaced relative to each other as the springs 410 are compressed and the amount of the displacement will be the measure of the amount of tension on the cable, and when this tension has increased to the desired amount, the brake shoes 39| and 392 may be released slightly to permit the brake drum 390 to rotate with that predetermined amount of displacement between the hand wheels 464 and 466. After the brake shoes 39| and 392 have been set to apply the proper tension to the cable, they will require practically no attention, but willmaintain the cable under that tension since any slack in the cable will be taken up by the springs 410 driving the driven member or bearing 441.

It is believed to be thus apparent that the reel 38| may be rotated in timed relation to the drive of the carrier chain while maintaining the cable being reeled on the reel under a selected tension.

As the reel rotates to Wind the cable 380 on it, the framework, comprised of the angle members 435, 436, 431, and 438, which carry the reel, will be shifted across the cradle 315 by the distributing mechanism, which includes the screw 48| and the block 480, and as the reel moves across the cradle during the rotation of the cradle, the cable 380 will be distributed across the drum of the reel from one head thereof to the other, the direction of rotation of the screw 48| being reversed each time one of the collars 490 or 493 is pushed against its associated anglemember 436 or 435, with suiicient force to snap the latches 504 or 505 into and `out of latching engagement with the shoulder 499.

Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been described herein, it will be understood that the construction shown is subject to numerous modifications and that applicants invention is to be limited only by' the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A cable-making machine comprising means for feedingy insulators to an assembly area, means for directing wires into engagement with said insulators, means for applying a sheath to the'assembled wires and insulators, and means for imparting a twist to the assembled wires and insulators.

2. A cable-making machine comprising means for feeding insulators to an assembly area, means for directing wires into engagement with said insulators, means for applying a sheath to the assembled wires and insulators, and means for imparting a twist to the assembled wires and insulators during the application of the sheath to the assembled wires and insulators.

3. A cable-making machine comprising a spacer-carrying device, means for feeding spacers to said device one at a time, means for directing wires intoy association with spacers carried by said device, tape feeding mechanisms for applying a sheath 'to the assembled wires and spacers, and a twisting takeup for reeling the sheathed wires and spacers and imparting a spiral twist to the assembled wires and spacers.

4. A cable-making machine comprising a spacer-carrying device, means for feeding spacers to said device one at a time, means for directing wires into association with'spacers carried by said device, means for forcing the wires into slots in the spacers, tape feeding mechanisms for applying a sheath to the assembled wires and spacers, and a twisting takeup for reeling the sheathed wires and spacers and imparting a spiral twist to the assembled wires and spacers.

5. Av cable-making machine comprising a spacer-carrying device, means for feeding spacers to said device one at a time, means for directing wires into association with spacers carried by said device, means for forcing the wires into slots in the spacers, micrometrically adjustable supports for said last-mentioned means for accurately spacing wires on the spacers, tape feeding mechanisms for applying a sheath to the assembled wires and spacers, and a twisting takeup for reeling the sheathed wires and spacers and imparting a spiral twist to the assembled wires and spacers.

6. An apparatus for making a cable comprised of spaced and spirally formed wires held spaced by insulators placed at spaced intervals throughout the length of the cable including assembling means for forcing a plurality of wires into gripping engagement with insulators, means for ap-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2469565 *Nov 23, 1943May 10, 1949Western Electric CoApparatus for forming metal tape into tubular conductors
US2471299 *Mar 21, 1945May 24, 1949Western Electric CoCable forming machine
US2661525 *Aug 8, 1949Dec 8, 1953Edwards Ray CMethod and apparatus for making finned tubes
US4539739 *Dec 29, 1983Sep 10, 1985Harvey Hubbell IncorporatedApparatus for making armored electrical cable
US4609416 *Jun 5, 1985Sep 2, 1986Harvey Hubbell IncorporatedMethod for making armored electrical cable
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/6, 29/728, 29/755, 57/12, 29/33.00D
International ClassificationH01B13/06, H01B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationH01B13/18
European ClassificationH01B13/18