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Publication numberUS2215899 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1940
Filing dateOct 29, 1938
Priority dateOct 29, 1938
Publication numberUS 2215899 A, US 2215899A, US-A-2215899, US2215899 A, US2215899A
InventorsMercer Beasley
Original AssigneeMercer Beasley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Removable weight and balance adjustments
US 2215899 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 1940- McBEASLEY REMOVABLE WEIGHT AND BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS Filed Oct. 29, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

44WM, r M

ATTORNEYS M. BEASLEY 2,215,899

REMOVABLE WEIGHT AND BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS Filed Oct. 29,. .1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Sept. 24, 1940.

IN VENTOR ATTORNEYS Y 6 h. P a W m MW 2 2 W Fig: 7

Eigdfi a m n 2 a w 1 Patented Sept. 24, 1940 UNITED STATES REMOVABLE WEIGHT AND BALANCE ADJUSTMENTS Mercer Beasley, New York, N. Y.

Application October 29, 1938, Serial No. 237,662

18 Claims.

My invention relates toa novel means for adjusting the weight and balance primarily with reference to tennis racquets. More specifically my invention relates to a readily removable partial circumference flexible tube adapted to carry and be positively compressed about a weight and means for indicating on the racquet the relative adjustment of such weights.

Many efforts have been made in the prior art to produce a balance adjustment for tennis racquets in such a manner that the user of the racquet could easily and efficiently make a proper initial balance adjustment of the racquet, and change this adjustment from time to time in accordance with his increasing skill in the game and increasing control of the racquet. Most of the efforts that have been made have had serious drawbacks. Thus, in one type of prior apparatus there is a tube carrying weights strung together by a cord positioned within the tube. It has, however, been found that these weights are difficultly adjustable in that it is necessary to insert an implement in a split part of the tube to move the weights in proper position. The weights do not have sufficiently positive friction engagement with the surrounding walls of the tube and tend to slip. The entire arrangement is too complex with too many possibilities of the device going wrong.

Other types of prior methods include weights mounted on threaded members which, when rotated, effect up and down movement of the weight. The drawback in devices of this nature is very real in that the threaded engagement between the weight and threaded member soon becomes loose causing involuntary movement of the weight which, of course, completely nullifies the proper balance effect and makes accurate adjustment impossible. Further, the users do not know where the weight is except by guess work. In addition, in these devices rust and dirt soon make operation of the weighting adjustment an impossibility. In cases where a key is required for tightening, the necessary key for adjustment is not always available.

Many other different balancing devices have been suggested for golf clubs, bats and billiard cues, but none has solved the problem of providing a practical weight and balance adjustment that is easily manipulated by the user and in which there are no inherent difliculties in extended use. I

The problem of balance and weight control in a tennis racquet is no paper problem. Players who are learnin the game of tennis find 2. normal racquet too heavy and insist that it affects their stroke. As they learn more about the game and become accustomed to the manipulation of the racquet, they demand a greater weight behind their stroke. Obviously when the same racquet is to be used as is practicably desirable, it is necessary that weight and balance adjustments be made. I

But the problem of weight and balance control is by no means confined to the novice in the game. The better players and especially the very highly skilled players find the balance and weight of the racquet to be a vital point in their game. When they become accustomed to a certain predetermined balance and weight it becomes of great importance that the difierent racquets that they necessarily must use be uniform. with respect to this weight and balance feature. With highly skilled players in this field, there is a necessity for a variation in the weight of the racquet when playing on different types of courts such as clay courts as opposed to grass courts. Obviously, it is extremely desirable that the player use the same racquet with which he is very familiar, to play on both types of court. For this reason, an easily adjustable weight and balance control is an actual necessity.

In the racquets now employed such adjustment is diihcult and surrounded by guess work and dissatisfaction. Ordinarily such adjustment must be made at the place of purchase and is an expense to the store and a bother to the purchaser.

In spite of the many varied and complicated devices shown in the prior art for the adjustment of the weight and balance control, as a practical matter this problem is commercially solved today by the use of a rubber weight adhesively fixed within the handle at a certain spot. Adjustment of this weight is achieved only by boring. out this weight and inserting a new weight at an-v other spot.

The difficulties with this type of weight adjustment are manifest. For any but the most skilled player, an accurate test of the racquet with respect to itsweight and balance features at the time of purchasing is a virtual impossibility. Ordinarily the racquet is tested by the purchaser in the store by a series of swings and weightings in the hand. What may appear to be a satisfactory recquet from the standpoint of weight and balance in the store, may prove to be entirely unsatisfactory when it is used on a tennis court to strike the ball. The ordinary players more often than not misjudge the type of weight and balance they desire and after the first use of the racquet return to the store with the request for adjustment, whereupon the store is put to the expense of reboring and insertion of a new weight.

My invention provides a means for weight and balance control operable by the user of the racquet and adjustable at any time. It comprises an entirely withdrawable casing containing a compressible weight. The player may at intervals during play vary the adjustment of his Weight and balance to find the optimum position by withdrawing the casing from the hollow handle of the racquet and shifting the position of the weight in the casing. The weight and balance control of my invention is further featured by the characteristic that it is securely and immovably gripped in the position in which it is placed without the possibility of its shiftng or rattling even after long periods of use. My novel balancing means is characterized by simplicity and absence of moving parts. It is further featured by the ready replaceability of weights and by the fact that with facility, balancing means of different sizes and weights may be used alternately or in combination.

My novel weight and balance adjustment means comprises a casing as of a flexible metal that only partially surrounds a compressible weight contained within the casing. The casing has rolled edges as sides which contact with the sides of the weight. The weight employed in my novel device is rubber or plastic or any suitable elastic and resilient weighting means. The weight is positioned by the user in a predetermined position within the partial casing and is maintained in proper longitudinal position in that casing by certain placement means, as for example, pointed prongs which penetrate the weight or by certain positive positioned means, as will be set forth.

The balance adjustment is made with the casing withdrawn entirely from the racquet, and in that position the casing only lightly grips the weight. When the weight has been properly positioned in its desired position, the partial casing section is compressed and forced into the hollow handle of the tennis racquet, the side walls of the cas'nig moving toward each other. Thereupon the resilient casing firmly grips the weight in place and the gripping means, such as the sharp prongs hold the weight firmly in place against the possibility of its moving in any direction. The weight may be released only when the casing is withdrawn from the racquet so that the flexible casing can be sprung out. To prepare the racquet handle to receive the weight and balance adjustment of my invention, the handle is bored with approximately a three-quarter inch bore to a depth of seven inches. Many racquets already have this bore so that no extra work is required. A flexible metal strip is then formed into the part-sectioned tube which forms the casing of my invention and one end of this casing is fixed to a knob which fits into engagement With the bottom of the racquet to form a closure therefor. The fixing of the two sides of the casing to this knob makes possible the ready withdrawal or insertion of the casing within the hollow handle of the racquet. Further, this fixing increases the resilient grip of the casing upon the enclosed weight. The metal of the casing may be penetrated in a suitable manner to provide a pin pricked interior, thus forming piercing prongs on the inside of the casing to grip the resilient weight. The weight itself has a relatively deep split contained along its length extending far into the weight so that it may be movably compressed aside from the resilient nature of the material of the weight itself. I

In the drawings I shall specifically set forth the various modified forms of my invention whereby, following the broad principles I shall set forth,I provide various clamping and retaining means to provide casings withdrawable from the handle of the tennis racquet in which weights are firmly positioned.

I further provide on the exterior of the hollow handle a balance scale which corresponds to a similar balance scale impressed on the exterior or interior of the casing which contains the weight. Information imprinted with respect to the balance scale on the exterior of the handle indicates the proper positioning of the weight within the similar marked casing for increasing the weight of the racquet for heavier stroke or for adjusting the feel. Thus, when the weight is positioned at the uppermost portion of the casing, because of the centrifugal force exerted when the racquet is swung, the racquet feels heavier and a heavier stroke is' obtained.

The correlated balance scales which I provide, one on the exterior of the handle of the tennis racquet and the other on the casing, perform a number of useful functions. First, they indicate desirable positionings of the weight With respect to the desired force of the swing of the racquet. Secondly, they enable the user to uniformly adjust different racquets to a predetermined balance by the correlation of the weight positioning in accordance with the weight of the different racquets'.

It is therefore, an object of my invention to provide a novel balance adjusting means comprising a removable casing adapted to be positioned in the handle of the tennis racquet.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a novel partial section of a tube adapted to firmly hold a flexible weight in predetermined position.

It is a further object of my invention to coordinate a balance scale externally of the handle of the racquet and a corresponding balance scale on the casing which positions the weight of my invention.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a metal casing having integrally formed therein predetermined positioning means adapted to position a flexible weight contained within said cas- It is a further object of my invention to provide a perforated casing having sharp prongs on the inner surface of the casing, said prongs being adapted to pierce and grip a resilient weight such as a rubber weight.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a casing comprising a partial tube section, the walls of which are adapted to be materially compressed to grip a weight contained therein when the casing is inserted in a hollow racquet handle.

It is a further object of my invention to provide a casing fixed to a manipulating and closure member at one end of such casing which afiixing maintains the walls of the casing in proper relative position.

It is a further object of my invention to provide an easy method of withdrawing the casing from the racquet handle by placing a ring on the knob at one end of the racquet.

Figure 1 represents a perspective of the racquet of my invention showing the exterior of the racquet and the balancing scale indications on the handle thereof; I I

Figure 2 is a perspective of the weight and balance control means of myinvention showing the weight in its relation to the casing.

Figures 3, 4, 5, and '6 are perspective views showing modified'forms of the Weight and balance control means of my invention.

Figures 7, 8, 9 and 10 are side cross-sections of the handle of the tennis racquet showing the weight and balance adjustment means shown in Figures 2, 5, 6 and 3, respectively.

Figures 11 and 12 are cross-sections taken along the lines IIH and |2-I2-of Figure '7.

Figure 13 is a cross-section taken along the line I3--l3 of Figure 8. l

Figure 14 is a cross-section taken along the line I4-|4 of Figure 10.

Figure 15 is a cross-section taken along the line I5l5 of Figure 9. I

Figure 16 is a cross-section of the handle of the tennis racquet in which the weight and balance adjustment means of Figure 4 are employed.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, in Figure 1 I show a tennis racquet I with a handle 2. On the handle 2 appropriately positioned is a balancing scale 3 marked in a predetermined manner. The handle 2 of the tennis racquet I is hollow and is adapted to contain the weight and balance adjustment means shown in Figures 2 to 6.

In the weight and balance adjustment means shown in Figure 2 is a casing 5 of a satisfactory material such as metal, as for example aluminum or brass, or any other suitable lightmetal. In lieu of metal, this casing may be composed of plastic material or any suitable material that is flexible and compressible. By compressible I mean that the side walls 6 and 'l of the casing 5 can move towards each other under the pressure of the hollow handle 2 when the weight and balance means is inserted therein. The normal position of the walls 6 and 1 with respect to each other represent a diameter greater than the internal diameter of the hollow handle, and when the balance means is inserted in the handle, necessarily the walls are pressed towards each other. Positioned within the walls of the casing and adapted to be compressed thereby is a weight 8 composed of rubber or any suitable flexible material having a slot 9 which preferably extends at least the distance of the radius of the weight and usually the slot extends even farther through the weight. The slot is important because upon the compression of the flexible weight by the side walls, the weight is fixedly compressed to the extent that the portions 0 and H of the weight are forced towards each other and can move towards each other because of the slot 9.

Thus, when theweight isproperly positioned in its predetermined place within the casing in accordance with the markings l, 2, 3, and 4 along the side of the casing, which correspond to the similar markings on the exterior of the handle, and the casing is inserted in the hollow handle of the racquet, the narrower diameter of the hollow handle compresses first the walls 6 and 1 of the casing 5, then the flexible weight 8 and finally reduces the size of the groove because the portions [0 and II of the weight move towards each other. This combination of factorsmakes certain that the weight will be firmly gripped in the handle against any movement whatsoever. To insure against longitudinal movement of the weight in the casing and-to facilitate easy positioning of the weight in the casing, I provide projections l5 in the bottom of the casing positioned at predetermined points along the casing. In combination with the side compression of the weight, these projections l5 and I6 secure the weight against movement.

On one end of the casing is positioned a handle I! joined to the casing 5 by the slot members l8. By means of this rigidly attached handle the casing may be withdrawn from the hollow handle for adjustment of the weight.

In Figure 3 I show a casing 20 suitably marked by numerals 2| along its side, the numeral corresponding to the numerals on the exterior of the handle. The casing is suitably punched or perforated to form upwardly projecting points or prongs 22 suitably spaced at intervals along the interior gripping surface of the casing. When the rubber weight 24 is inserted in the casing 20, it is impaled upon the projections 22 and firmly secured thereby against movement. As described above in connection with Figure 2, when the casing is inserted into the hollow handle the smaller diameter of the hollow handle compresses the side walls of the casing 20 and causes a very efficient gripping of the weight by the casing so that because of the natural compressibility of the weight and the pointed prongs 22 which impale the rubber weight 24, the weight and hence the balance of the racquet are firmly secured against any possible movement during strenuous play. The weight 24 is preferably composed of rubber although it may be of any material which is compressible and may be penetrated by the prongs 22. It preferably has a deep slot 25 which extends at least the distance of the radius of the weight into the weight. The projecting points or prongs may be formed either by causing the casing to bulge at the points onythe interior or by actually preforating the casing inwardly to provide sharp points on which the rubber weight is impaled.

In Figure 4, another modified form of my invention, I provide a casing with side walls 3| and 32. In the side wall 32 are slots 33 adjacent which are positioned suitable numerals indicating scale positions of the slots. In the casing 30 is the compressible weight 34 containing the deep slot 35 above described. In the side of the weight and suitably secured thereto is an arm 36 which, upon rotation of the weight to which it is amxed, moves into the slot 31 and is secured therein to insure the weight against longitudinal movement. The firm positioning of this Weight 34 in the casing is provided by the compression of the side walls 3| and 32 against the compressible weight and by the further positioning factor of the arm 36 held in a suitable slot, as shown. This modified form as in the case of the form shown in Figure 2 provides against guesswork in positioning of the weights and insures that the weights will be placed in a desired predetermined position. At the end of the casing I provide a handle 38 suitably fixed by the extension 39 to the casing 30.

In Figure 5 I show a further modified form of my invention in which a casing 40 is so shaped with regard to the terminating edges of the side walls 4| and 42 as to form slots 44, 45, 4B and 41 in addition to the slot 48 in which the weight is shown positioned. The slots are formed by the projection of the parts 5|] and 5| which demark the respective slots and maintain the weight against longitudinal movement. The projections 50 and 5| are normally spaced with regard to each other. I

The weight in thismodified form is shown in place at 52 and again has the deep slot 53. The weight extends in the form of two sections 54 and 55 and is positioned in the desired slot in the casing by manually compressing the extensions 54 and 55 towards each other, and longitudinally moving the weight to its desired slot position, whereupon the extensions 54-55 are allowed to move outwardly against the side walls of the casing. The weight is firmly secured in its proper position in the casing as in the other forms shown above by the compressing action of the internal Walls of the hollow handle which move the walls of the casing 45 towards each other and consequently the projections 50 and 5! are moved towards each other. The side walls of the casing grip the sides of the weight 52 and tend to compress it and the slot projection sections of the walls which I shall term the lips of the side walls move in against the weight and actually physically move the extensions 54 and 55 towards each other and at the same time bite into and fric tionally engage the weight 52. As can be seen the weight 52 is thus firmly secured against any possible movement in any direction by the casing 40 and its component parts.

I wish to direct attention to the fact that although I have shown the slot and groove nature of the lips of the casing I may employ this form of my invention without the various longitudinal positionings of slots and extensions by using only a straight edge lip or a rough edge lip. The weight 52 in that event may be used without the extensions 54 and 55. In this latter form of my invention the lips, which I shall generally designate as 56 and 51, bite into the top of the weight 52 and thus in addition to the frictional engagement of the side walls of the casing this lip engagement of the casing with the top of the weight acts to firmly secure the weight in its proper position. When an irregularly shaped lip is employed an enhanced engagement is secured. In combination with this straight lip form of my invention I may employ the spaced prongs in the walls of the casing as shown in Figure 3 above.

At the end of the casing 40 is an extension 59 by means of which the casing is permanently secured to the end of the handle as shown in Figure 8. This provides for a firm withdrawal means for the handle.

In Figure 6 I show a still further modified form of my invention in which rods PB and 'il carrying suitable markings l2 thereon are joined at one end as shown at 73 and spaced from each other at 74. In this form of my invention I provide a weight 15 with the deep slot 76 described above and the laterally positioned grooves TI and 18. The grooves H and 78 in the sides of the weight are adapted to move on the rods '10 and l l At the joining section It I provide a securing means i9 by means of which this balance means can be firmly and permanently secured, if desired, tothe bottom of the handle of the racquet.

In the use of this form of my invention the weight 15 is suitably positioned at the predetermined place within the rods and H as indicated by the numerals l2 and the ends 80 and BI of the rods 10 and H are compressed towards each other and inserted into the hollow handle of the tennis racquet. The entire weight and balance adjustment means is then forced into the handle whereupon the rods 10 and H are compressed towards eachother compressing the weight both because of the normal compressible nature of the flexible material such as rubber of which it is comprised and also because the two halves of the weight 15 are forced towards each other in the slot 15. Serrations or irregularities 82 may be provided in the portions of the rods 10 and H which abut the weight and will serve, Where necessary, to fix the weight even more securely.

It will be seen in all the forms of my invention which I have illustrated and specifically described above, that I have taken great pains to insure against any possibility of lateral or longitudinal movement of the weight in the casing, and that I have provided that once the weight is set in its proper position, it is firmly secured by the casing and, upon compression of the side walls of the casing by the small diameter of the interior of the tennis racquet handle, there is no possibility of any movement or rattling of the tennis racquet weight within the handle. The various diiferent means which are employed to insure against displacement may seem physically redundant, but it is important to the very essence of this invention that there be no movement in any direction of the weight in spite of the strenuous use of the racquet in which it is positioned.

In Figure 7 I show the cross-section of the handle carrying the weight and balance adjustment means of my invention contained therein. As can be seen, the hollow in the handle extends to a major extent of the handle and is indicated at 90. The casing 5 shown in perspective in Figure 2 is shown in its proper position within the handle and it can be seen how the casing extends the entire distance of the hollowed out portion. When the casing has been properly inserted with the weight in its predetermined position in the hollow of the handle, the end 9| is suitably engaged on to the handle as by the screw thread engagement shown at 92. The positioning of the weight 8 within the extensions l5 secures the weight against any longitudinal movement within the casing and the side compression of the walls on to the compressible weight 8 makes certain that the weight 8 cannot move in any direction.

In Figure 10 I show the prongs 22 with sharp points thereof which effectively bite into and grip the weight 24.

Although in the foregoing I have described my invention specifically with relation to tennis racquets, it will be clear that the weight and balance adjustment herein described may be useful in any implement, tool or instrument used for any purpose in which a balance adjustment of the handle of such instrument may be necessary. Where weight or balance adjustment of the form of my invention is mounted in the handle of any such instrument, as for instance a tennis racuet, it is also clear that any adjustment which it is necessary to make will be a rapid and easy one. Thus, for instance, where during the process of using a tool or instrument containing such balance adjustment, it becomes necessary or desirable to shift the balance or change the efiective weight of the head of the instrument or tool as far as the particular user is concerned, the user may merely remove the casing from the handle, shift the weight to the desired position, re-insert the casing once more and find the tool completely readjusted and ready for use again. Such an operation may well take but a few seconds. For this reason the markings on both the casing or other holding means such as the rod --.element described, and the corresponding markings on the handle of the tennis racquet or other tool become extremely useful in that they guide 'the 1 useror operator in, the proper determination inthe setting or re-adjustment of his tool, thus tending to cut down even further the time spent on re-adjustment and thus almost eliminating any waste motion or time.

It should. also be noted that while I have described myinvention inrelation to two general types of casings orholding means for the weight, to wit, the part tubular section casing or the two rods, my invention will work equally well using any type of casing which is adapted or intended to be compressed within the hollowed out handle andwhich by itscompression is intended to hold the handle in place. Thus the hollowed-out portion of the handle may be squareor rectangular in sectionand the casing itself may be of part rectangular. section so that the two sides are angularly related to the bottom wall, rather than curvilin'early related thereto; the weight being similarly proportioned or arranged to fit within such a casing. l l

1 Obviously also thecasing and corresponding weight may have many other forms or shapes all within the spirit. of my invention. In addition, it may be pointed out that the casing itself need. not consist of a single integral sec tion formed .ina manner to engage the weight, butmay consist of a plurality of sections'yieldingly mounted with respect to each other so as to permit them to compress the weight between them.:-The :diametero-f the entire casing including its various sections is slightly greater than that of the hollow. portion of the handle intowhich'it i's to fit. :Thus, the casing itself may consist of two matching segments, each comprising a member or part tubular section, each so .arranged that a weight may be captured'betwen" the sides of each of them and almost completely held between them with eno'ughof the weight projecting to permit adjustment thereof. Such segments are arranged, however, so that in. the retract-ed position of the casing, the casing itself would-be slightly larger in. diameterwthan. the hollow of the handle; the" segmentsr being nevertheless arranged to permit a compression thereof to securely engage the weight in predetermined position when the casing is mounted in the: handle.

Many other'variations of my invention are thus obviously possible; all within the limitations of my disclosure; Iprefer; however, not to be limited by the disclosure 1 herein, but only by the appended claims. 3 l

l. balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said 'racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, saidbalance adjustment comprising a retractable compressible casing mounted in saidhollow'handle, and a movable weight'held in predetermined position by said retractable casing-," sai'd casing being compressed and. gripping "said weight securely when said casing is mounted in saidhandle.

2. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening: at thefend thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of 'greater width than the hollow oi the handle, saidcasing being mounted in said hollow handleand compressed thereby, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle.

3. A balanceadjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casingnormally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle and compressed thereby, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said casing beinga tubular member of part cylindrical section, said weight being a substantially cylindrical member.

4. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, saidbalance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mountedin said hollow handle and compressed thereby, and a movable Weight heldin predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casingis inserted in said handle, said casing being a tubular member of part cylindrical section, said weight being a substantially cylindrical member, lips on the edges of said casing pressinginto said Weight and holding it securely in place when said casing is inserted in said handle.

5. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow .handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of great-er width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight. held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said'casing being a tubular member of part cylindrical section, said weight being a" substantially cylindrical member of compressible resilient material, and prongs insaid casing engaging said weight when said weight is positioned in said casing.

6. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, and additional means on said casing firmly gripping said weight when said casing is secured within said handle. 7. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than. the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides said casing being mounted in said hollow handle,

and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said weight being mountable at various portions along the length of said casing to attain a weight adjustment, and markings on said casing and said handle to indicate diiferent adjustments.

handle, said weight being mountable at various portions along the length of said casing to attain a weight adjustment, and means for securing said weight at any desired adjustment.

10. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle,

, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said weight being mountable at various portions along the length of said casing to attain a weight adjustment, and means for securing said weight at any desired adjustment, said means comprising slots in said casing and a registering arm on said weight.

11. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said weight being mountable at various portions along the length of said casing to attain a weight adjustment, and means for securing said weight at any desired adjustment, said means comprising interengageable slots on said casing and said weight.

12. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said weight being a compressible resilient member of a section comformable to the sides of the casing and the walls of the hollow of the handle.

13. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable member mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position by said retractable member, said retractable member comprising a pair of rods resiliently mounted with respect to each other, the distance between them beyond their mounting being slightly larger than the diameter of the hollow of the handle, said weight comprising a compressible member having grooves positioning it on said rods, the insertion of said rods in said handle compressing them toward each other and securing the weight in predetermined position on said rods and in said handle.

14. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said weight being a compressible resilient member of a section conformable to the sides of the casing and the walls of the hollow of the handle, and a slot in said weight extending longitudinally of said handle when said weight is within said handle, the portions of said weight along the sides of the said slot being compressible toward each other.

15. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable resilient casing normally of greater width than the hollow of the handle, said casing being mounted in said hollow handle, and a movable weight held in predetermined position in said casing, the sides of the casing gripping said weight when said casing is inserted in said handle, said weight being a compressible resilient member of a section conformable to the sides of the casing and the walls of the hollow of the handle, said weight comprising sections compressible toward each other in a direction at right angles to the ain's of the handle when said weight is mounted in said handle.

16. A balance adjustment for the handle of an instrument, said handle being hollow, said hollow portion extending to one end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable compressible member mounted in said hollow handle and compressed thereby and a movable weight held in predetermined position by the compression of said retractable member.

1'7. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable compressible member mounted in said hollow handle and compressed thereby and a movable weight held in predetermined position by the compression of said retractable member, and a closure member at one end of said retractable member closing said opening when said retractable member is inserted in said handle.

18. A balance adjustment for a tennis racquet, said racquet having a hollow handle and an opening at the end thereof, said balance adjustment comprising a retractable compressible member mounted in said hollow handle and compressed thereby, and a movable weight held in predetermined position by the compression of said retractable member, and a retracting means at one end of said retractable member for withdrawal of said member from said handle.

MERCER BEASLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4027881 *Dec 23, 1974Jun 7, 1977Paul Francis Marcel HufenusTennis racket with variable balance and weight
US4690405 *Oct 19, 1983Sep 1, 1987Frolow Jack LTennis racket
US6024660 *Aug 11, 1998Feb 15, 2000Romanick; RonSports ball throwing training device
US7918752 *Nov 14, 2007Apr 5, 2011Mcclung Iii Guy LamonteGame apparatuses
US8556756Mar 25, 2011Oct 15, 2013Karen Therese McClungGame apparatuses
US20120214624 *Sep 1, 2011Aug 23, 2012Edward Allen SteinRacket and a Process that Allows the Entire Length of the Racket Handle Accessible to Receive Insertable and Removable Cartridge Carriers of Various Weights for Play Testing and Racket Customization
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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/519
International ClassificationA63B49/04, A63B49/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B49/06, A63B53/145, A63B59/0014, A63B49/04
European ClassificationA63B49/04