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Publication numberUS2215995 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 24, 1940
Filing dateJul 1, 1939
Priority dateJul 1, 1939
Publication numberUS 2215995 A, US 2215995A, US-A-2215995, US2215995 A, US2215995A
InventorsBellack Richard F
Original AssigneeFox River Paper Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Duplicating device
US 2215995 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept 24, 1940- R. F. BELLACK DUPLICATING DEVICE Filed July 1l 1939 .ITI

T y v I l I l l Patented sept. 24, 1940l DUPLICATING DEVICE Richard F. Bellack, Neenah, W18-, assigner to Fox River PaperV Corporation, Appleton, a cor- -poration of Wisconsin Application )uly 1, 1939, Serial No. 282,403

10 Claims. (01101-131) My invention relates to an improvementv in reproducing masters, and the method of their formation and use. 1

One purpose is the provision of a master or impression member for use yin duplicating lnvoices, shipping instructions, orders and the like.

Another purpose is the provision of a method of and means for masking out part of such a master when different portions thereof are desired in different reproductions or impressions.

Another purpose is the provision of an improved combined master and mask, Aor primary master and secondary master, in which the mask or secondary master is readily removably secured directly to the primary masterk without the need of intermediary securingmeans, clamps or the like.

Other purposes will appear fromjime to time in the course of the specification and claims.

I illustrate my invention more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing wherein:

Fig. 1 is a plan view illustrating a single mask applied to a reproducing master;

Fig. 2 illustrates the application of a plurality of individual masks to a single master;

Fig.'3 illustrates the application to a master of a mask or supplemental master having reproducible material on its rear face;

Fig, 4 illustrates a master with a coa-ting strip applied to one margin;

Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 illustrates a mask with a coating strip applied to one margin thereof; and

Fig. y'l is a section on the line 1-1 of Fig. 6.

Like pa-rts are indicated .by like symbols throughout the specification and drawing.

My invention should be considered in-connection with the duplicating process which is performed by making a master of the material which is to be duplicated, by typing with carbon paper, writing, or drawing with proper inks,

crayons or pencils.- The material to be transferred to the finished paper mustappear in reverse on the master, an arrangement which may be effected by putting carbon against the back of the master a-nd thus. by pressure, applying it to the back of the master. When the master is finished, it may be fastened to a cylinder or press, not illustrated herein, and a revolution of the cylinder maybe used to press the master against a sheet 'of impression paper, which may for exainple be mechanically wetted with a suitable solution just before being brought into contact with the master. The pressure of the wetted sheet against the master transfers a part of the pigone or another of the copies.

ment from the master tothe impression paper, and thus makes a copy of whateverimpression or impressions are exposedon the master.

A good material or paper for a master is a paper which is coated with a substance which retains a largedegree of pigment from the carbon, pencil, crayon or ink, and releases it to the wetted impression paper in a thin film. Such a coating may be similar to a dull vsurface enamel coating which picks easily when any tacky substance is broughtinto contact with itand removed. In other words, the characteristics of the paper for the master proper or for the impression receiving surface of the master is a relatively loose or rough or dull finish.

It often happens that a master is used to re produce a plurality of copies where parts of the material on the master should be omitted from `As an example of what my invention avoids or replaces, the following steps may belisted:

(1) When an order that involves several items is received, it should normally be acknowledged as a unit. The order is therefore typed as a unit, and one acknowledgment run off from the master, all of the impression of the master vbeing at that time exposed.

(2) Thereafter, if the order must be handled in several units, the entire order is run off as many times as is necessary, and a hand operation tional hand operations oneach copy are necessary to indicate the important portions of the impression received from the master, or to cross out or cancel the unimportant or undesired items. In addition to the time involved in the above mentioned hand operation and the chance of error, the finished product is unattractivel in appearance, particularly for invoices or other outgoing forms. As a result, many concerns forego invoicingby this process, and thus duplicate the amount of work done by invoicing as a separate operation.

In my invention I provide means readily se-- cured to or removed from the master itself, which are effective to mask out all undesired items, or

to add substitute or additional items. Considering, for ei'rample, Fig. 1, a primary master sheet is indicated at I. Along its margin, as at 2, Is a hardened or treated marginal area. I may, for example, apply a hardeningl agent which will eliminate the "picking usually found in a coated paper such as the paper necessary for the master, or which will eliminate any disturbance or removal of fibers in uncoated papers. A wide variety of hardening .agents is effective, for example cellulose acetate, nitrocellulose lacquer, varnish, starch, glue, rosin, Cellophane, glassine, or any other substance which will prevent loss of loose fibers or of coating by the application and removal of an adhesive.

3 indicates the impressions on the master which are to be reproduced. Assuming that some of the material isto be omitted from any given impression or impressions, I may apply a mask li, which has a marginal or edge portion 5, which may be provided with any suitable pressure adhesive. All that is necessary to apply the mask is to lay the mask in position, as shown in Fig. 1, with the adhesive portion 5 opposed to the hardened marginal portion 2 of the primary master. The mere application of pressure is suicient to hold the mask in position, and the master I may be applied to any suitable printing mechanism, or run on or through any suitable roll or rolls. Only the impression of the exposed portion of the material 3 can be taken.

Thereafter, if the entire impression is again desired, the mask form may be removed by merely jerking it off, as a little tension applied thereto will break the bond between the adhesive and the hardened portion 2 of the master I. However, because of the nature of the hardened portion 2 of the master I, the paper will not be pulled away, and little, if any, of the adhesive will be left on the primary master. On the contrary, it adheres almost entirely to the treated edge portion ofthe mask itself, and the mask can be stored by merely being pressed against a treated or hardened storage strip on a wall, in a drawer, file or the like.

It will be understood that I may employ a single mask, or a plurality of masks, as shown for example in Fig. 2, where it is desirable to blank out a scattered sequence of items. It will be further understood that, whereas my invention may be applied merely to blanking out portions of a primary master, it may equally readily be applied to inserting portions, either to ll blanks in a partially impressed master, or to substitute overlying material for the material blanked out in the primary master. I thus illustrate in Fig. 3 a combined mask and secondary master, indicated at 6, with its adhesive top portion 1. It may be applied to the master I just as in the case of the masks of Figs. 1 and 2, but it also serves as a supplemental or secondary master, the material 8 on the back thereof being reproduced at the same time as is the exposed material '3 on the primary master.

It will be understood that where in my claims I describe the mask or secondary master as carrying an adhesive, or wherein I describe a hardening treatment or area of the primary master, such adhesive material or such primary hardened area may be formed by treatment of the primary and secondary masters or the masks themselves, or may be obtained by superposition of additional layers of material. Thus, it is under some circumstances practical to take an ordinary master of relatively soft or rough surface and apply to the edge thereof a surface coating or tape, or overlay, which may be relatively permanently secured to the primary master, as shown at 8 in Fig. 4, and which has an upper surfacev 9 sufficiently hard or firm or smooth to perform the same function as the treated marginal edge 2 of Fig. l. Similarly, adhesive tape or adhesive coated material may be. applied in strip form to the edge of the mask or secondary masters shown in Figs. 6 and as at Il.

I realize, therefore, that whereas I have described and shown a practical and operative article of manufacture, nevertheless many changes may be made in the size, shape, number and disposition of parts, and in the steps of formation and use without departing from the spirit of my invention. I wish my description and drawing, therefore, to be taken as in a broad sense illustrative and diagrammatic rather than as limiting me to the specific showing of my description and drawing.

I claim:

l. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicating master assembly including a. primary master having along an edge a protective surface of greater solidity than the general surface of the master, and one or more secondary masters adhesively and readily removably secured thereto.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a dupli' eating master assembly including a primary master carrying on one face material to be reproduced, said primary master having along an edge a portion having a surface more resistant to adhesive decomposition than the normal surface of .the master, and one or more secondary masters adhesively and readily removably secured to said edge of the primary master, and having portions overlying the nrmal surface of the primary master.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicatingmaster assembly including a primary master carrying on one face material to be reproduced, said primary master having along an edge a portion having a surface more resistant to adhesive decomposition than the normal surface of the master, and one or more secondary masters adhesively and readily removably secured to said edge of the primary master, and having portions overlying the normal surface of the primary master, said overlying portions carrying additional material to be reproduced.

4. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicating master assembly including a master having along an edge a protective surface of greater solidity than the general surface of the master, and one or more masks adhesively and readily removably secured thereto.

5. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicating master assembly including a master carrying on one face material to be reproducecLsaid master having along an edge a portion having a surface more resistant to adhesive decomposition than the normal surface of the master, and one or more masks adhesively and readily removably secured to said edge of the master, and having portions overlying the normal surface of the master.

6. A method of reproduction of impressed material, which includes providing a master element, consolidating a marginal area thereof to provide a surface harder and more resistant to adhesive decomposition than the surface of the rest of the master, providing a mask, applying pressure adhesive to a marginal portion of said mask,

positioning said'mask upon the master with said adhesive portion opposed to the hardened marginal portion of the master, and with the body of the mask overlying part of the reproducible material o n the master, and thereby blanking out some of such material, and taking an impression of the master with the mask in position, and thereafter removing the mask, by subjecting it 'to tension.

7. A method of reproduction of impressed material, which includes providing a master element, consolidating the marginal area thereof to provide a surface harder and more resistant to adhesive decomposition than the surface of the rest of the master, providing a secondary master, applying pressure adhesive to a marginal portion of said secondary master, applying impressed material to be reproduced to the body portion of said master, positioning said secondary master upon the primary ymaster with said adhesive portion opposed to the Ahardened marginal portion of the primary master, and with the body of the secondary master overlying part of the reproducible material on the primary master, and thereby blanking out some of such material, and with the impressed material of the secondary master in position to be substituted therefor, and taking an impression of the exposed portion of the primary master, and of the secondary master, and thereafter removing .the secondary master by subjecting it to tension.

8. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicating master assembly, including aprimary master and one or more secondary masters adhesively and readily removably secured along an edge of the primary master.y

9. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicating master assembly, including a primary master and one or more secondary masters adhesively and readily removably secured along a single edge of the primary master.

10. As a new article of manufacture, a duplicating master assembly, including a primary master and a secondary master adhesively and readily removably secured along an edge of the primary master, the face of one of the opposed members having a protective surface of greater solidity than its general surface. the opposed face of the opposed member having an adhesive portion thereon.

mcmmnnnmnacx. 85

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423553 *Apr 1, 1943Jul 8, 1947Ditto IncProcess of printing from a composite hectographic form
US2449770 *Apr 2, 1945Sep 21, 1948Ditto IncMethod of running direct process gummed units
US2459067 *Apr 7, 1945Jan 11, 1949Ditto IncMethod of duplicating
US2540158 *Jan 29, 1947Feb 6, 1951Addressograph MultigraphPlanographic printing and adhesive sheeting for use therein
US2556144 *Jul 12, 1946Jun 5, 1951Columbia Ribbon & CarbonPlanographic master plate
US2707433 *May 18, 1949May 3, 1955Ditto IncMethod and means for line printing
US2999453 *May 2, 1955Sep 12, 1961Ditto IncMeans for line printing
US3322065 *Jun 22, 1965May 30, 1967Procter Bernice ERotary spirit duplicator addressing machine
US5782494 *Apr 23, 1996Jul 21, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyDesktop printer notes
US6063229 *Feb 3, 1998May 16, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyMethod of article assembly formation
US6544640Jan 13, 2000Apr 8, 20033M Innovative Properties CompanyArticle assembly stacks
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/473, 281/2, 462/70, 101/132.5
International ClassificationB41L1/00, B41L11/08, B41L1/34, B41L11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41L11/08, B41L1/34
European ClassificationB41L11/08, B41L1/34