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Publication numberUS2218330 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 15, 1940
Filing dateJan 10, 1939
Priority dateJan 10, 1939
Publication numberUS 2218330 A, US 2218330A, US-A-2218330, US2218330 A, US2218330A
InventorsEllason Oscar C
Original AssigneeBell Telephone Labor Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilator
US 2218330 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 15, 1940.

o. c. ELIASON VENTILATOR Filed Jan. 10, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTCR By 0. C. EL/ASON A TTOIQNE V Get. 15, 1940. O Q ELIASON V 2,218,330

VENTILATOR Filed Jan 10, 1959 s Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2

INVENTOR y o. C.EL/A$0N A TTORNE V Oct. 15, 1940;

O. C. ELIASON VENTILATOR Filed Jan. 10, 1939 5 Sheeis-Sheet -3 A TTQRNEV 0. c. ELIAISON Oct. 15, 1940.

VENTILATOR Filed Jan. 10, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 E ENF PH.

/N VENT OR Oct. 15, 1940. 0 EUASON 2,218,330

VENTILATOR Filed Jan. 10, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 lNl ENTOR 0. C. ELIASON L I lac nml Patented Oct. 15, 1940 UNITED STATES 2.218.330 VENTILATOR Oscar C.-Eliason, Chatham, N. J., asslgnor to Bell Telephone Laboratories, Incorporated, New 'York, N. Y., a corporation or New York Application January 10, 1939, Serial No. 250,107

3 Claims.

This invention relates to ventilator apparatus and more particularly to a ventilator unit for supplying air to a room.

An object of the invention is to provide means 6 in the ventilator for controlling the supply of air passing through the ventilator.

A feature of the invention resides in a holding means for a shutter in the ventilator.

Another feature resides in a means for controlling the operation of a motor driven fan.

Another feature resides in an inlet structure of the ventilator.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a view in perspective and partly in 35 section of an upper portion of the ventilator and a portion of a window in a wall structure of a building;

Fig. 2 is a front elevational view of the ventilator and a portion of the window and with por-- m tions of the ventilator broken away to disclose some of the inner parts;

Fig. 3 is a view in perspective and partly in section of portions of the ventilator and the window in the building and taken from outside of the as window;

Fig. 4 is a view in perspective and partly in section of the shutter and its holding means and some of the nearby parts of the ventilator structure and is drawn on an enlarged scale relative so to the other figures in the drawings;

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view partly in section of the ventilator and a portion of the window; and

Fig. 6 is a view of a portion of the structure 35 shown in Fig. 5 and in reverse position relative to Fig. 5.

The ventilator described herein is adapted to condition air and supply the conditioned air in regulated volume to a room, the air being taken 40 in through an opening in a window located in the wall structure of the room.

The ventilator as shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 5 comprises a casing l adapted to be placed ad- Jacent a window 2 and an air inlet casing 3 supported in the lower sash 4 of the window 2. The casing I has a rectangular air inlet portion 5 extending from the back of the casing and in a position slightly above the sill 6 of the window 2. The inlet portion 5 is flanged on its rear edge 50 portion to provide a peripheral flange I, the lower and side portions of the flange I being formed to provide channels 8 adapted to receive a peripheral flange 9 formed on the inner end portion of the air inlet casing 3. The upper portion of the g5 peripheral flange 1 is not made in the form of a channel but is left plain to receive a channelshaped upper edge portion In of the peripheral flange 8 on the air inlet casing 3. The air inlet casing 3 is a rectangular box-like structure mounted in the sash 4 of the window 2 and ex- 5 tending transversely through the sash 4 so that an open inlet end portion ll provided with louvers I2 extends outward on the outside of the sash. The sash 4 may be specially constructed to include the air inlet casing 3 or may be a standard 10 and well-known type of window sash modified to include the air inlet casing 3. It is contemplated that the sash 4 is so mounted in the window frame it as to permit raising and lowering of the sash relative to the sill 6. If a standard type of sash having horizontal rows of window panes therein is used, the lower row of window panes may be removed to provide a space to accommodate the air inlet casing 3, the casing 3 having flanges M-N to engage portions of the sash 4' and being secured thereto by suitable fastening means, suchfor instance as the screws l5. In Fig. 1 the sash t is shown as-belng in a position slightly raised from its normal closed position.

In Figs. 2, 3 and 5, the sash 4 is shown asbeing in fully closed position which is the normal position of the sash when the ventilator is in operation. In this normal position, the channelshaped upper edge portion Iil of the flange 9 on the air inlet casing 3 fits over the upper plain portion of the flange l on the inlet portion 5 and the lower portion of the flange 9 on the air inlet casing 3 flts into the lower portion of the channel 8 on the inlet portion 5. It can readily be seen by looking at Figs. 2, 3 and 5 that when the sash l is in normal closed position, it would be dimcult to get at some of the window panes in the sash to clean them because portions of the window panes are below the level of the top portion of the ventilator casing I. By raising the sash 4, however, to the position shown in Fig. 1, access may be had to the portions of the window panes normally below the level of the upper portion of the ventilator.

Within the casing I and supported therein and a in a horizontal position, as shown in Figs. 2 and 5, is a shelf IS. The shelf lfi'supports a blower comprising a motor I! and fans (not shown) but supported on opposite ends of the motor shaft l8. The fans are housed in the fan housings l9 and 20 and are adapted to draw air in through openings in the ends of the housings l9 and 20 and drive the air through apertures in the shelf l8 located in line with openings provided in the lower sections of the fan housings l9 and 20. Air

ducts 2lf and 22 extend from the openings in the shelf l8 to direct the air delivered by the fans of the blower to air passages extending up opposite ends of the casing l. The air passages 3 mentioned are not shown in the drawings but are defined by end portions of the casing and two vertical wall members 23 inwardly spaced from the ends of the casing. The wall members 23 extend a from a bottom wall 24 of the casing I, upwardly to a sloping wall member 23. The wall member 23 extends horizontally across an upper portion of the casing and between the top portions of the wall members 23, 23 and slopes downwardly from a point slightly above the top of the inlet portion 3 to the front of the casing I.

Dust screens 28 and 21 are located in the casing I. The dust screens 28 and 21 comprise suitable frameworks fllled with material adapted to screen out dust particles from the air taken in by the ventilator. The material may be for instance mineral wool impregnated with oil. The screens 28 and 21 are stacked one on top of the other and are supported by means of a rack 28; The rack 28 extends between the wall members 23, 23 and slightly above the fan housings l8 and and supports the screens 28 and 21 in a horizontal position. The screen 23 rests on a cushion 28 supported on the rack 28.

A grilled opening 38 is provided in the top of the casing l to permit escapement of the air into a room. A heating device 3| may be provided in the ventilator to heat the air before the air passes through the grilled opening 38, the ends of the casing being apertured at suitable points to accommodate inlet and outlet connections 32 for the heating device 3|. The course of the air through the ventilator is shown by the arrows in Figs. 2 and 5, when a shutter 33 to be later described is in an opened position. so The shutter 33 is a swinging wall member adapted to regulate the volume of air passing through the ventilator and is disposed adjacent the inner end of the inlet portion 3. One edge portion of the shutter 33 as shown in Figs. 4 and 45 5 is attached to a cylindrical tube 34 encompassing a rotatable rod 33, the tube and rod being secured together by suitable means so that rotation of the rod 33 will cause swinging movement of the shutter 33. The rod 33 is journaled at one end in a bearing 38 shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the bearing 38 being mounted in an apertured plate 31 secured to an outer face of one end portion of the casing l. A manually operated handle 38 is secured to this end of the rod 33 to permit manual operation of the shutter 33. The other end of the rod 33 as shown in Fig. 6 is rotatably supported in an apertured bracket 39 which is secured to an inner wall surface of a back portion of the casing I. When the handle 38 is in the position shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the shutter 33 is in the dotted line position shown in Fig. 3. In this position the shutter 33 extends into the inlet portion 3 and the inlet portion of the ventilator is in fully opened condi- 05 tion to permit free passage of air to the fans.

By turning the handle 38 in a clockwise direction the shutter 33 may be moved to various positions between fully opened and fully closed poiii) sition to regulate the volume of air flowing to the fans. In Fig. 5 the shutter 33 is shown in full line in fully closed position. In this position of the shutter 33 the lower edge of the shutter bears against a strip 48 which is secured to an inner wall surface of the back portion of the casing l. The shutter 33 as shown in Figs. 4; and 5 is located below the higher edge portion of the sloping wall member 23 in the casing l and is adapted to swingwithin the inlet portion 3. A holding means generally indicated by the number 4| and which will hereinafter be referred to as a brake is provided to hold the shutter 33 in various positions.

The brake 41 comprises a bracket 42 and a pivotally supported arm 43. The bracket 42 is attached to the inner face of the shutter 33 and has an arcuate extension 44 bowed inwardly from the inner face of the shutter 33. The extension 44 has a broad outer face adapted to be frictionally engaged by a block 43 mounted on the free end of the arm 43, The block 43 may be made of asbestos or other material suitable for making good frictional holding engagement with the outer face of the extension 44 and is beveled on its upper face to make good frictional engagement with the curved portion 44 of the bracket 42. The block 43 serves as a brake shoe to hold the shutter 33 in an adjusted position. The arm 43 is pivotally supported at one end on a shaft 43, the shaft 48 being supported in spaced arms of a U-shaped bracket 41 which is attached in inverted position to the under surface of the sloping wall member 23. The pivotally supported end of the arm 43 is provided with downwardly extending spaced ears 48 which are aperturedto receive the shaft 48. The arm 43 has a relatively long straight portion 49, a downwardly sloping portion 38 and a relatively short straight portion 3| extending at an angle from the sloping portion 30 and supporting the brake shoe 43. The arm 43 is arranged to swing downward to release the brake shoe 43 from engagement with the arcuate extension 44 of the bracket 42, but is normally held in elevated position by means of a bar 32. The bar 32 normally extends transversely beneath the under surface of the relatively short portion 3| of the arm 43 and is held in this position by means of a fusible link 33 of relatively low melting point metal and a spring 34 which extend downward in parallel spaced relation from brackets 33 secured on the under surface of the sloping wall member 23, the upper end portion of the fusible link 33 being secured to a bracket 33 by means of a bolt 38 and the upper end of the spring 34 being hooked into or otherwise secured to its associated bracket 33. The fusible link 33 is anchored to one end of the bar 32 by means of a hook-shaped bolt 31 and a nut 38, the threaded end of the bolt 31 extending through an aperture in the bar 32 and the nut 38 being adjustably disposed against the under surface of the bar 32. The lower end of the spring 34 is anchored to a bolt 39 which extends through an aperture in the bar 32, the spring 34 being hooked into a transverse aperture in the bolt 39 and a nut 30 being provided on the bolt 33 and bearing against the under surface of the bar 32 so that suitable tension may be developed in the spring 34 by turning the nut on the bolt 38. The pull of the spring 34 on the bar 32 may be regulated by means of the nut 30 so that the brake shoe 43 will have suflicient frictional engagement with the curved extension 44 of the bracket 42 to hold the shutter 33 in any adjusted position determined by operation of the handle 38 on the outside of the casing, but still permit manual adjustment of the position of the shutter 33 through operation of the handle 38.

When the arm 43 is held by means of the fusible link 33 and the spring 34 in the position shown in Figs. 4 and 5, the relatively long portion 43 or the arm 43 bears upward against an operatingimember 3| a switch 32 to hold contacts (not shown) in the switch 32 in a closed circuit position. The switch 32 is housed in a casing 33 supported on the sloping wall member 25, a portion of the switch 32 being extended through an aperture in the wall member 25 to meet the portion 49 of the arm 43 and the switch 82 being arranged to control the supply of operating current to the'motor I. The switch 321s arranged to open its contacts and cut ofl the supply of operating current to the motor ll when the arm 43 is released from engagement with the operating member 3| oi the switch.

The shutter 33 as above mentioned may be swung to various positions within the inlet portion of the ventilator to regulate the volume of air passing through the ventilator to the room supplied, the shutter being moved by manual operation of the handle 33 and being held in any adjusted position by means of the brake 4|. Should the temperature in the room rise, however, to a relatively high degree, such as might be caused for instance by the breaking out of a fire in the building, the fusible link 53 will melt and release the brake shoe 45 from engagement with the curved portion 44 of the bracket 42. When the fusible link 53 melts and releases its associated end of the bar 52, the spring 54 tilts the bar 52 so that it no longer holds up the free end of the arm 43. The arm 43 thereupon swings downward and carries the brake shoe 45 out of engagement with the curved portion 44 of the bracket 42. The shutter 33 then swings downward by gravity and shuts oil the supply of air to the ventilator. When the arm 43 swings downward the portion 49 of the arm 43 swings away from the control member 3| of the switch 52 and allows the switch contacts to open. The opening of the switch contacts cuts off the supply of operating current for the motor I! and hence stops the fans in the ventilator simultaneously with the closing of the shutter 33. In order to insure that the shutter 33 will move to the fully closed position when the brake 4| is released and the shutter swings downward by gravity, a spring 64 and a lever 65 are provided as shown in Fig. 6. The spring and lever operate on an over-center principle and are effective to aid the gravitational movement of the shutter 33 when the shutter is nearing its closed position, but are ineffective to hold the shutter in an opened position, the spring 34 being too weak to overcome the weight of the shutter. The lever 65 is secured at one end to an end of the rod 35 opposite to the end occupied by the handle 38 and extends radially upward of the rod 35, the point of attachment of the lever 65 to the rod 35 being beyond the point where the rod 35 extends through the bracket 39. The spring 64 is secured at one end to the free end of the lever 55, the other end of the spring being secured to a lug 65 extending from an inner surface of the back wall of the casing and the lug 56 being located below and offset relative to the rod 35.-

When the shutter 33 is swung over its center line of travel in either direction, the spring 64 is stretched as the center line is being passed and on either side of the center line of travel the spring 54 contracts and aids the movement of the shutter in the direction of its travel. The spring 64, however, is too weak 'to pull the shutter against the holding action of the brake 4| and as above mentioned is also too weak to hold the shutter 33 against its own gravitational movement when the brake 4| is released. However, when the shutter 33 is swinging down beyond its center line of travel toward the closed position, and the gravitational force becomes less effective to move the shutter as the lower end of the shutter comes more directly under the point of suspension of the shutter, the spring 34 and lever 35 supplement the lessening gravitational force suiilcient to continuemovement of the shutter to the fully closed position so that the lower end of the shutter comes to rest against the strip 43.

The wall members forming the casing and the inlet portion 6 or at least some of the wall members are preferably made in laminated form as shown particularly well in Fig. 5. The laminated wall structure is provided for attenuation oi the sound waves entering the ventilator or produced by themotor and fans and to prevent or reduce vibrations of the wall structures such as might cause the generation oi sound waves in the room. The wall structures, for instance, may be made in layers, one 01. the layers being made of sound or vibration absorbing material. The three-layer back wall of the casing for instance, may comprise two outer layers of metal and an intermediate layer of asbestos or other vibration absorbing material. The same construction may also be i'ollowed in the inlet portion 5, the sloping wall member 25 and in other parts of the casing structure.

The dust screens 26 and 21 as above mentioned are disposed horizontally within the casing and simply restone on top of the other on the cushion 29. The dust screens are located between the brake mechanism 4| and the motor i1. Since the screens 26 and 21 have to be cleaned or replaced from time to time and ad- Justment of the brake mechanism and replacement of the fusible link may at times be required, a door 31 is located in the front portion of the casing in a position to provide access to the dust screens and the brake mechanism. The door 61 is hingedly attached at its lower edge portion to the front wall of the casing and is provided with a latch device 53 at its top edge portion.

What is claimed is: 1. In a. ventilator comprising a casing, having air inlet and outlet openings, in combination, a

airinlet portion, in combination, a shutter supported within said casing and adapted to swing within said air inlet portion, manually operated means to swing said shutter and a brake to hold said shutter in an adjusted position, said brake comprising a curved bracket supported on said shutter, an arm pivotally supported in said casing, a brake shoe carried on said arm and adapted to frictionally engage said bracket, a bar extending beneath said brake shoe and in engagement with said arm and a spring and i'usible link supported in parallel spaced relation and anchored to said bar and said casing to hold said brake shoe in engagement with said bracket.

30 2. In a ventilator comprising a casing and an 4- I amasso 3. In a ventilator comprising a casing, a tan therein, a motor for said tan and air passages in said casing in communication with the fan and the outside of said casing, in combination, a

shutter supported in said casing and arranged to swing across an air e, a curved bracket supported on said shutter, a switch for said motor, an arm pivotally supported in said casing,

a portion of said arm engaging said switch to fusible link normally holding said arm in a posi- 5 tion to hold said brake-shoe in engagement with said bracket and said arm in engagement with said switch.

OSCAR C. ELIABON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2502980 *Nov 19, 1946Apr 4, 1950York CorpAir flow directing means for room air conditioners
US2612098 *Mar 3, 1950Sep 30, 1952Bolin Henry JCasement window for air conditioners
US2862437 *Sep 24, 1956Dec 2, 1958Smith Filter CorpVentilating device
US2873703 *Jun 2, 1955Feb 17, 1959V & E Products IncSafety device for preventing hopper fires in coal furnaces
US3165053 *Nov 15, 1962Jan 12, 1965Christie Walter GAccessory for air conditioners
US4625626 *Nov 11, 1983Dec 2, 1986Halton OyControl/fire damper for ducts inventilation installations
US5660605 *Sep 18, 1995Aug 26, 1997Holmes Products Corp.Window fan
US8155797Aug 12, 2009Apr 10, 2012James WieseWindow fan control system and method of controlling a fan unit
US9188352Aug 12, 2010Nov 17, 2015James WieseSystem and method for controlling a fan unit
US20110039490 *Aug 12, 2009Feb 17, 2011James WieseWindow Fan
US20110040412 *Aug 12, 2009Feb 17, 2011James WieseWindow Fan Control System and Method of Controlling a Fan Unit
US20110155365 *Aug 12, 2010Jun 30, 2011James WieseSystem and method for controlling a fan unit
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/200, 55/418, 74/531, 192/116.5, 137/72, 126/299.00R, 454/207
International ClassificationF24F1/00, F24F11/02
Cooperative ClassificationF24F11/02, F24F1/0007, F24F2221/20
European ClassificationF24F1/00C, F24F11/02