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Publication numberUS2219501 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1940
Filing dateSep 21, 1937
Priority dateSep 21, 1937
Publication numberUS 2219501 A, US 2219501A, US-A-2219501, US2219501 A, US2219501A
InventorsWickman Lauri A
Original AssigneeWickman Lauri A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glove
US 2219501 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

GLOVE Filed Sept. 21, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet .1

H/5 ATTORN EY Oct. 29,1940. A. WICKMAN 2,219,501

GLOVE Filed Sept. 21. 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet '2 INVENTOR LHU/P/ flw/cx Hi5 ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 29, 1940 I I v t I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE GLOVE. v Lauri A. Wickinan, San Francisco, Calif. Application September 21, i937, Serial No. l64,889 1 3 Claims. (01. 2 161 My invention relates to the making of gloves; stead of catching in crevices formed by seams. and the broad object of the invention is to pro- In almost all trades, where tools are handled, vide a glove having seams so disposed as to af the absence of seams along the upper edge of ford least interference with a tool or other the forefinger and adjacent inner edge of the article gripped by the wearer. thumb: is very important. A tool handle" is Another object of the invention is to provide a pp between these parts and a Smooth surglove especially designed for welders, and having face, without seams,'is highly desirable. A seamseams so disposed as to avoid crevices where less palm is also important in a worker's glove, drops of hot metal are likely to catch. especially for choppers and ropers, since the tool 1 A further object of the invention is to provide handle or rope lies across the palm. My im- 10 a lov made of sections whi h may be bl nked proved glove is characterized by the absence of from sheet material with minimum waste. Seams in the parts ne and is further The invention possesses other objects and feadesigned to c p se few parts S0 tha Cutting tures of advantage, some of which, with the foreand assembiirlgis S p fied.

going, will be set forth in the following descrip- In terms of broad inclusion. the glove of y 15 tion of my' invention. It is to be understood invention comprises a section extending over a that I do not limit myself to this disclosure of side fh han n h v ng a portion folded species of my invention, as I may adopt variant over to form a seamless ridge along an edge of embodiments thereof ithin th scope of th the hand. A section is also provided to extend claims.

Referring. to the drawings? nected to the first sectionby a seam extending Figure 1 is a side elevational view of the palm along the latter S d The first Section p side of a hand, for purposes of defining the ably lies on the. back side of the hand and prefnomenclature employed in describing the glove. erably has portions. eXtending O r the backs of Figure 2 is a plan view showing the blanks or the thumb and forefinger, and portions of the 25 sections from which my glove is made, and illusback Section a p ab folded Over to Cover trating the method of cutting the blanks from a the fronts of t thumb a d i fi these sheet of material with little Waste. folds being alone e inner edge of the thumb Figure 3 is an elevational View looking at the and pp edge of e f efi e to form seamfront, or palm side of a, glove embodying my in- IGSS margins along these edges. The gloveporover the other side of the hand, and is con- 20.

vention; and o tions at each of the fingers are also preferably Figure 4 is a. similar vi w showing portions of folded over to form seamless margins along the the glove with the thumb extended. edges 0f e fi rs.

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken in a plane In greater detail, and referring to the drawindicated by the line 55 of Figure 3, showing ings, t glove embodying y nVentionis best 35 the seam construction. 1 describedwith reference to the parts of a hand. Figure 6 is a rear elevational view of the glove; For p o of d fi t a hand is ShOWn and in Figure 1 with the front or palm side facing Figure 7 is a front elevational view of a mit the Opposite Side being'referred 0 as the 4.0 embodying a similar construction. back. The principal parts of the hand are Figure 8 is a front elevational view showing a identified as 3, fi modified glove construction. 4, middle'finger 5, ring finger 6, and little Figures 9 and 10 are front and back elevational g Upper ed e'8 of the hand is that views showing still another modification; and e ge l g above the p W t e hand is Figure 11 is a plan view showing one-piece. positioned as s wn; and upper g 9 f t e 45 finger sections.- forefinger is a continuation of edge 8. -Lower Figure 12 is a back elevational view showing d ll of the hand is that e y g be ow a'modification of the glove in Figures 9 and 10. the palm'when the hand is pos t s w In making gloves for workingmen there are and. flower edge l2 of the little finger is a conseveral important considerations from the tinuation of edge ll. The edges between the standpoint of the wearer that are overlooked by fingers are called inner edges; and the edge the glove manufacturer. For example, absence I3of the'thumb is also called the inner edge.. of seams across the back and along the upper Edge M of the thumb is called its outer edge. ridge of the hand is important in welders gloves The sides of the fingers facing out in Figure 1 so that drops of molten metal will'roll ofi" inare called the fronts, and theopposite sides are called the backs. The side of the thumb facing out in Figure 1 is the back, and the opposite side is the front. Those portions of the fingers and thumb adjoining the palm are referred to as the base; and the points between the fingers adjacent their bases are called junctures.

Now referring to Figure 2, the glove of my invention is formed from sections or blanks cut from a parent sheet iii of any suitable material, such as leather. The back section of the glove comprises a body portion l! of generally rectangular shape for extending over the back of the hand, and has a tab I8 projecting from one side. This tab extends over the back of the thumb. A somewhat smaller tab from the top side of the thumb tab l8, and is separated from the other portions of the glove by a out having an outer straight portion 2| and an inner curved portion 22. This latter tab folds over to cover the front of the thumb.

Another tab 23 projects from the top of body portion l! to extend over the back of the forefinger, and a smaller tab 24 is formed alongside to fold over and cover the front of the forefinger. A V-shaped notch 23is cut in at the base of finger tab 23 to allow portions of this tab to be turned in along the inner side of the finger. A tab 2'! also projects from the top of body portion I I for extending over the back of the little finger. A V-shaped notch 23 is also cut in at the base of this tab to permit portions of the tab to be turned" in along the inner side of the finger.

The front section of the glove comprises a body section 29 for extending over the palm of the hand, and having three outwardly projecting tabs 3|, 32 and 33, adapted to extend over the backs of the little finger, ring finger and middle finger, respectively. A triangular tab 34 projects from one side of the body section, and is bounded by a curved edge 36 and an irregular edge 37 terminating at the base of middle finger tab 33.

Two other finger sections 38 and 39 are also provided for extending over the backs of the ring and middle fingers, respectively. These sections may be separate and cut out between the front and back sections, as shown in Figure 2, with a minimum of waste material.

The assembled glove is shown in Figures 3 to 6. In forming the glove the front and back sections are first stitched together along the seam 4| which extends across the lower portions of the thumb to the junction between the middle and forefingers. Sections 38 and 35) of the ring and middle fingers are then stitched at their bases to the back section along the seams 42 and 43. See Figure 6. The front and back sections are then folded together to bring the finger tabs into register; portions of the back section being folded over in this operation to form a seamless ridge 44 along the upper edges 8 and 9 of the hand and forefinger.

The fingers and lower edge of the glove are then stitched together by a seam lfi running from the tip of the forefinger to the lower end of the palm. In making this seam it is to be noted that tabs at the backs of the fingers are pulled forward over the edges of the fingers to form seamless margins along these edges, Likewise portions of the rear section are folded over to form a seamless ridge along the lower edges I l and I2 of the hand and little. finger. Seam 46 thus faces the front side of the glove and leaves smooth the portions between the fingers and along the lower edge of the hand. Figure 5 clearly shows how I9 projects the back section I! is folded over to form the seamless ridge 41 along the lower edge of the hand.

The next step comprises stitching on the cuff 48, if a separate cuff is employed. Finally, the thumb and cuff are closed by stitches along a seam 49. The thumb is formed by folding tab l9 over tab 18, this fold being along the inner edge 13 of the thumb to provide a seamless margin along'this edge. As was the case with the other fingers, the back tab "3 is pulled'in over the outer edge of the thumb, so that seam 49 lies in front, leaving the edge smooth. Of course the stitching is done with the glove in reverse, so that the stitches are inside, as shown in Figure 5. The latter figure also shows the preferred form of seam, including a spacer strip 5|. As shown in Figure 6, the short seams at the bases of finger sections 38 and 39 may be covered by a piece 52 stitched tothe finger sections and to back section II. I i

The above description relates to a five-fingered glove, but the term glove as used herein is not limited to such, but also includes gloves having less than five fingers, such as mitts. ure 7 shows a mitt having a separate thumb and forefinger. This construction is very similar to the glove first described, as comparison of Fig-. ures '7 and 4 will disclose. There are just two sections in this mitt since the separate finger sections are unnecessary, the middle, ring' and little fingers being held by the mitt portion 53.

Figure 8 shows a modified form of glove construction, in which a tab 54 for covering the front of the middle finger is also formed on the back section instead of the front section. A separate section 56 is provided for the front of the thumb, and is stitched to the front section by a seam 57. Seam 58 extends completely around the thumb and terminates at the junction between the middle and ring fingers. While this construction still has the advantage of a seamless ridge along the upper edges of the palm and forefinger, it does have a seam adjacent the inner edge of the thumb. An extra thumb piece is also required in this construction.

In both types of gloves shown in Figures 3 and 8, the finger sections 38 and 39 may be formed as a single piece, as shown in Figure 11. The advantage of cutting these sections in separate pieces was of course to permit the economical cutting arrangement shown in Figure 2.

Figures 9 and 10 show another modified construction, which is somewhat similar to the form in Figure 3, but in reverse; that is, the thumb and forefinger tabs are formed 'on the front section instead of the back section. In this case the back section is made in two pieces SI and 62 connected by a seam 63. The back section is folded over to provide a seamless ridge 64 as before. This back section also has three tabs 66, 61. and 68 for extending over the backs of the little, ring and middle fingers.

Front section 69 carries the thumb tab and also a tab H folded over to cover the back of the thumb. A tab 12 is also provided on the front section for extending over the forefinger, and a tab 73 is folded back to cover the back of the forefinger. These folds are along the inner edge of the thumb and upper edge of the forefinger, to form seamless margins along these edges. Front and back sections are connected by a seam 14 across the lower back portions of the 'thumb'and Figin between the tip of the little finger and the cuff.

tions being connected to the front section along seams l9 and 8|. The glove is closed by a seam 82 extending from the tip of the forefinger, about the fingers, and then along the lower edge of the glove. In this seaming it will be noted that the front section and the front finger tabs are folded in over the edges of the fingers and the lower edge of the hand to provide smooth seamless margins along these edges. This seam faces the back side of the glove, as shown in Figure 10.

In assembling the glove the front section 69 is first joined to piece 62 of the back section along seam "M, then the two pieces 6! and 62 of the rear section are connected along seam 63. Next the front finger sections 17 and 38 are stitched to front section 69 along seams 19 and 8|, and then the front and back sections are joined by seam 82. Finally the thumb is closed by a seam 83 extending from the tip of the thumb to the cuff edge of the glove. I

This latter glove is especially suited for chop- Y pers and ropers, since there are no seams where the tool handle or rope passes between the thumb and forefinger and across the palm.

These gloves work up very well in leather, but it is understood that other materials, such as canvas, may be employed. When using cane vas, the glove shown in Figure 10 may be made with less number of pieces by forming the back and front sections in one piece. In this case the back and front sections are joined integrally along the lower edges of the palm and little finger. This eliminates the portion of scam 82 Such a glove would therefore be formed all in one piece, except for the small finger sections 11 and 18. Figure 12 shows the back of such a glove; the front of course being the sameas thatshown in Figure 9.

I claim:

1. A glove comprising a section extending over the back of the hand, a tabintegral with said section and extending over the back of the thumb Y and having a portion folded over to cover the front of the thumb, the fold being along the inner edge of the thumb to form a-seamless margin along said edge.

2. A glove comprising a section extending over one side of the hand, a tab integral with said section and extending over a side of the thumb and having a portion folded over to cover the other side of the thumb, said fold being along the inner edge of the thumb to form a seamless margin along said edge, the portions of the thumb tab being connected together by a seam along the outer edge of the thumb, and a sectionextend- -ing over the other side of the hand and connected to said folded over portion by a seam originating at said edge seam and extending transversely across the thumb to the junction between the forefinger and middle finger.

,3. A glove comprising a section extending over the back side of the hand, a tab integral with said section. and extending over the back side of thethumb and having a portion folded over to cover the front side of the thumb, the portions of the thumb tab being connected together by a seam along the outer edge of the thumb,

and a section extending over the palm side of the hand and connected to said folded over portion by a seam originating at said edge seam and ex-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2460413 *Jun 11, 1945Feb 1, 1949Errett Sanford JWelder's double mitt
US2642573 *Apr 27, 1950Jun 23, 1953Huck Glove Company LtdWork glove, mitt, one-finger or the like
US2785412 *Dec 1, 1952Mar 19, 1957Zelenka Michael LWork glove and method of making same
US20040221366 *Jan 20, 2004Nov 11, 2004Jang Jong CheolThree-fingered welding glove
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/161.6, 2/169
International ClassificationA41D19/02
Cooperative ClassificationA41D19/02
European ClassificationA41D19/02