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Publication numberUS2219605 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1940
Filing dateJun 6, 1938
Priority dateJun 6, 1938
Publication numberUS 2219605 A, US 2219605A, US-A-2219605, US2219605 A, US2219605A
InventorsHenry Turkel
Original AssigneeHenry Turkel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for performing a biopsy
US 2219605 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 29, 1940. l H. TURKEL 2,219,605

DEVICE FOR PERFORMING A BIOPSY Filed June 6, 1938 Muse: I

ONE

' Patented Oct. 29, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFKIE 21 Claims.

examination for determination of; the type of tissue present, such as normal, cancerous, infected, etc., or in other words, for correct diagnostic purposes. I

In the past, biopsy always caused the patient pain, bleeding and soreness, thus very often required anesthesia. Further the existing methods required surgical preparation for cutting a large area of skin, thus separating the subcutaneous and muscular tissue and then chiseling or gouging out a portion of the bone, or cutting out other deep seated tissue, resulting frequently in bleed- 5 ing, spreading of infection and scar formation.

My invention consists of a device whereby removal of tissue is accomplished with the least amount of injury to the superficial and deep tissue, very little or'no pain, practically no bleeding and as a result practically no scar is left and only local or no anesthesia is required.

There is a minimum of soreness because only a very small hole is made through the tissue. Because of the ease of its manipulation, no assistants or operating room are needed, and biopsy may be done at any doctors office or in the patients home or bedside without any preparation.

In the case of removal of purulent material (pus) from infected tissue, it is impossible for the pus to spread and infect nearby tissue. This is accomplished because of the outer tube which protects the surrounding tissue from contamination and the inner tube through which the infected material is carried out either by direct removal, suction or irrigation.

My improvement provides an easy means of withdrawing specimens deep seated or superficial, soft or hard, like bone, fat, muscle, etc., or even liquid material for gross or microscopic examination.

For an understanding of my invention, reference should be had to the appended drawing of which:

Figure 1 in an elevational view of the external needle.

Figure 1a is a plan-view of the same.

Figure 2 is an elevational view of the stylet of the external needle.

Figure 2a is a plan-view of the same.

Figure 3 is an elevational view of the internal needle.

Figure 3a is a plan-view of the same.

Figure 4 is an elevational view of the stylet of 6 the internal needle.

Figure 4a is a plan-view of the same.

Figure 5 is a partially sectioned view of the interior grinding needle with handle attached.

Figure 6 shows plan views of two possibletypes of grinding edges for the internal needle. 5

Figure '7 is a section segment of the internal cutting needle illustrating the conical interior of its end.

Figures 8A, 8B, 8C, 8D, 8E, 8F, 8G are elevational views illustrating the operation of my de- 10 vice step by step as described in the accompanying specification.

My device is comprised of five parts: an external guiding, leading, and protecting hollow needle I, of Fig. 1, of any desired length, the end 5 2 of which is sharp coming to a point on the outside edge of the needle, the end of the needle having been cut on an oblique angle. The needle has a hollow head 3 with which it can be manipulated or to which a larger handle 2| of any 20 desirable size or shape may be separately attached. The head is also provided with indicating means 4 later to be explained.

The stylet 5, in Fig. 2, for the external needle I is designed to fit within the latter, the head 6 of the 25 stylet with a projection or stopper being so designed with a neck I as to be received and held by the head 3 of the hollow needle, as in Fig. 8A. The head by which the stylet can be manipulated is so designed that if desired a large handle 2| 30 may be attached in order to obtain additional leverage. The head of the stylet 5 is provided with a means 8 designed to cooperate with the indicating means 4 above mentioned in the head of the hollow external needle I. The pointed-35 end 9 of the stylet is also cut obliquely so that when the stylet is inserted within the hollow external needle, the end 9 of the stylet cooperates with the end 2 of the hollow needle in order to prevent improper cutting of the tissue when the 40 external needle I is inserted.

The hollow internal or cutting needle I0, of Fig. 3, whose diameter is equal to that of the stylet of the external-needle, is designed to be slipped within the external needle I after the 45 stylet 5 is removed. Similarly, the hollow head II of the internal needle I0 is designed with a neck I2 or other cooperating means so as to be received by the hollow head 3 of the external needle, as in Fig. 8D.. The lengths of the two so needles may be varied but the relation must be such that the internal needle I0 is longer but narrower than the external needle I. The internal needle III is provided with a cutting edge I3 upon its end. The design of the end I3 01' the .55

internal needle and the design of the cutting edge or teeth, as in Fig. 6, may be of different types depending upon what type of tissue is sought to be removed or drilled into, or depending upon whether hard, soft, or liquid matter is to be removed.

For hard tissue such as bone, the inside surface I3a of the end I3 of the internal needle I0 is cone shaped or otherwise converging; Fig. 7, so that hard tissue once wedged into the end of the needle after being cut by the cutting edge of the hollow needle can be removed along with the removal of the needle itself. Experience in the past has shown that with a purely hollow cylindrical interior, the cut tissue would slip away from the hollow needle and could not be removed; but for removing soft tissue such as portions of a breast tumor or cancerous growth, a cylindrical interior of the hollow needle is adequate. Also, the latter type is adequate for the removal of liquids such as pus, blood or for irrig'ation purposes. The hollow needle may be so designed as to allow the removal of as large a sample of tissue as is desired. The head II being used to manipulate the cutting needle is so designed that a larger handle may be attached for manipulating the hollow needle. A suction adapter or syringe 23 may be inserted either directly or through the large handle 2| into the head I I of the internal needle I0. Further, the head II of the hollow needle I0 is provided with an indicating means I4 similar to 4 on the head of the external needle I. The neck I2 and the portion of the needle directly below is provided with a graduated scale I5 so that one may determine how deeply the needle has been inserted into the tissue; and also for determining how deep to go into the tissue.

A stylet I6 with a flat bottom I! designed to be received within the internal needle I0 for forcing out or expelling the tissue held in the end I3 once it had been cut so that the sample may be examined. This stylet I6 is also provided with a head I8 for manipulating the same or to be attached to a larger handle 2I, the head I8 to be received within the bottom opening of the handle M. The head ll of the stylet I6 is also provided with a means I9 similar to 8 on the other stylet 5 designed to cooperate with the indicating means I4 above mentioned in the head II of the internal needle III. The neck 20 is designed so as to be received within the hollow head II. The length of the stylet I6 is such that when it is inserted within the internal needle, the end H of the former I5 reaches the and I3 01 the internal needle so that any tissue accumulated in the end of the needle may be pushed out. The inventor does not limit himself to the use of square heads, for any other shaped head is practicable; but it is believed that the squar head embodiment is preferable.

A handle 2| is provided to facilitate the use of I, 5, I0 and I5. The handle may be of variable shapes designed with an opening in its bottom to loosely lit the heads of all needles and stylets so that they can be easily pushed through or turned in the tissue or for the grinding of bone by means of the added leverage, and at the same time the handle itself is easily removable.

The handle may be transparent or provided with a reading slot 22 so that if a glass extension or syringe is inserted in the opening provided therein and connected to the head of the internal needle the presence of liquid may be detected.

To facilitate drilling into hard bone, a hand tissue or deep tissue, but by using the above de-.

scribed handle of my invention, pushing the needle through deep tissue and bone tissue or grinding therein is facilitated.

Operation Removal of tissue specimens living or dead, normal or abnormal. is accomplished with my novel invention by the insertion together of the external needle I and its corresponding stylet 5 into the tissue until the points of both as in Fig. 8A reach that portion of the body wherefrom it is desired to remove a specimen for microscopic examination. It is to be noted that this operation is accomplished with the head 5 of the stylet 5 tight within the head of the external needle; and likewise the ends 9 and 2 of the stylet and the external needle cooperate with each other so that the oblique plane upon which the stylet is cut corresponds with the oblique plane on which the end of the external needle is cut. By this means, the tissue is separated and not cut out of the patient when the needle is inserted.

The next operation Fig. 8B is to remove only the stylet 5 and insert, as in Figure 80, the hollow internal grinding needle I0 within the external needle I. The internal needle Fig. 8D manipulated by twisting the handle cuts out as much of the desired specimen of tissue as is needed, which tissue as it is out proceeds up into the end I3 within the hollow internal needle I0. Figure 8E shows the outer needle pushed further in so that the external tissue near the end of I3 will not press upon the internal drilled core and thus prevent it from coming out of the body when I0 is removed. The specimen is then withdrawn by removing the internal needle I0. In the case where it is desired to remove pus, blood or other liquid, the head II of the needle I0 is so designed as to receive a syringe or suction adapter 23.

The stylet I5 is designed to fit into the internal needle I0 and when so inserted will cause the expelling of the desired specimen from the needle for examination.

Figure 8F shows the external needle remaining in the tissue. Before this is removed, the stylet 5 must again be inserted, Figure 8G, and the two, i. e., I and 5 removed together. This prevents the escape of pus or blood preventing the spread of any infection, because the tissue separated by the initial operation of the external needle elastically closes as I and 5 are removed closing up the hole and holding back any remaining liquids.

. Now having described the invention hereof, reference will be had to the claims which follow:

I claim:

1..A device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of an exterior guiding and projecting hollow pointed needle, the end of which is cut on an angle, a hollow head thereon, indicating means in the top of the head; a stylet or solid pointed needle, the end of which is cut on an oblique angle, the outside diameter of the stylet being smaller than the interior diameter of the external needle, a solid head thereon, cooperating means which will fit within the hollow head of the external needle, means on the neck thereof to cooperate with the indicating means on the head of the external needle; and a hollow pan internal needle having a hollow head adapted to fit within the hollow head of said external needle, said needle having an outside diameter substantially equal to that of the stylet whereby it forms a snug fit in the bore of said external needle and an internal bore, the outer end of said internal bore flaring outwardly whereby a tapered recess is formed therein.

2. A device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of an exterior guiding and projecting hollow pointed needle, the end of which is cut on an angle, a hollow head thereon, indicating means in the top of,the head; a stylet or solid pointed needle, the end of which is cut on an angle, the outside diameter of the stylet being smaller than the interior diameter of the external needle, a solid head forming a cooperating means which will fit within the hollow head of the external needle, means on the neck there of to cooperate with the indicating means on the head of the external needle; a hollow internal needle having a hollow head adapted to fit within the hollow head of said external needle, said needle having an outside diameter substantially equal tothat of the stylet whereby it forms a snug fit in the bore of said external needle, and an internal bore, the outer end of said internal bore flaring outwardly whereby a tapered recess is formed therein; a handle provided with a reading slot, an opening in the bottom adapted to loosely fit upon the heads of the needles and stylet, an opening extending vertically through the handle within which may be inserted a glass extension or syringe.

3. In combination with a device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of a hollow needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof and a cutting means on the outer end thereof, indicating means in the top thereof, a calibrated scale upon the neck and upper part of the needle, an inwardly converging interior on said outer end; a solid. stylet or needle with a flat end,

designed to fit within the cutting needle, a solid head thereon, cooperating means which will fit within the hollow head of the cutting needle, and means upon the neck thereof to cooperate with the indicating means in the head of, said cutting needle.

4. In combination with a device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of an exterior guiding and projecting hollow pointed needle, the end of which is cut on an angle, a hollow head thereon, indicating means in the top of the head; and a hollow internal needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof and a cutting means on the outer end thereof, indicating means in the top thereof, cooperating means which will fit within the hollow head of the external needle, a calibrated scale upon the neck and upper part of the needle, and an inwardly converging interior on the said outer end.

5. A hollow guiding needle for piercing" and separating tissue, a hollow needle slidably disposed therein, having upon its outer end a cutting edge and corresponding therewith an inwardly converging interior, within which cut tissue may be wedged for removal, said exterior needle relieving the cut tissue specimen from the pressure of surrounding tissue to facilitate its removal, said interior needle also providing a channel for the passage of purulent material.

6. A device for the removal of tissue from a body comprised of a hollow needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof and a cutting means on the outer end thereof, and an inwardly concating means in the top of the head; a hollow internal needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof and a cutting means on the outer end thereof, indicating means in the top thereof, cooperating means which will fit within the hollow head of the external needle, an inwardly converging interior on said outer end; and a handle provided with a reading slot, an opening in the bottom of the handlewhich will loosely fit upon the heads of the needles, an opening extending.

vertically through the handle within which may be inserted a glass extension or syringe.

8. A device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of a hollow needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof and a cutting means I on the outer end thereof, an inwardly converging interior on said outer end; and a handle, provided with a reading slot, an opening in the bottom of the handle which will loosely fit upon the head of the needle, an opening extending vertically through the handle within which may be inserted a glass extension or syringe.

9. A device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of a hollow needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof and a cutting means on the outer end thereof, an inwardly converging interior on said outer end.

10. In combination with a device for the removal of tissue from a body, comprised of an exterior guiding and projecting hollow pointed needle, the end of which is cut on an angle, a hollow head thereon, indicating means in the top of the head; and a hollow internal needle, a hollow head on the inner end thereof with a cutting means on the outer end thereof, indicating means in the top thereof, cooperating means which which will fit within the hollow head of the external needle, an inwardly converging interior on the cutting end thereof; a solid stylet or needle with a flat end, designed to fit withinthe internal needle, a solid head thereon, cooperating means'which will fit within the hollow head of the interior cutting needle, and means upon the neck thereof to cooperate with the indicating means in the head of the interior needle.

11. A device as set forth in claim 1, said hollow internal needle having a cutting means at its outer end.

12. A biopsy specimen needle comprising a head member on its inner end and a hollow shank 15. A biopsy punch comprising a shaft whose piercing end is beveled completely around its periphery, said piercing end having a larger aperture at its extremity than the main bore of the shaft.

16. A biopsy punch comprising a shaft having a piercing end which is beveled, and slopes inwardly, and a head for said shaft which is knurled to enable quick rotation of the entire punch.

17. A biopsy punch comprising a hollow shaft having a piercing end which slopes inwardly, and a removable stylet for said punch having a sharp end adapted to protrude beyond the piercing end of said shaft.

18. A device for the removal of tissue from a body comprising a hollow needle having a piercing end, said end having an inwardly converging interior.

19. A biopsy punch comprising a combination of an exterior guidinghollow needle, the ehdoi which is cut on an angle, a hollow head thereon; a solid headed needle with its end cut on an angle, adapted to be removably inserted within said exterior needle; and a hollow internal needle 20 having a hollow head adapted to removably fit within saidexterior needle. the other end of said internal needle flaring outwardly to form a tapered recess.

20. A biopsy punch comprising a combination of an exterior guiding hollow needle, a hollow head thereon; a solid headed needle adapted to be removably inserted within said exterior needle; and a. hollow internal needle having a holv.low head adapted to removably fit within said exterior needle, the outer end of said internal needle flaring outwardly to form a tapered recess.

21. The combination of an exterior guiding hollow needle having a hollow head; a hollow internal needle with a hollow head, adapted to removably fit within said guide needle, having cutting means on the outer end thereof; and a headed solid needle adapted to be removably inserted within said internal needle.

HENRY 'I'URKEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2522108 *Sep 7, 1948Sep 12, 1950Memorial HospitalAspiration biopsy
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US3147750 *May 18, 1962Sep 8, 1964Altair CorpTissue interface detector for ventriculography and other applications
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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/566, 604/274, 604/164.1, 408/204
International ClassificationA61B10/02, A61B10/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B10/025
European ClassificationA61B10/02P4