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Publication numberUS2219807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1940
Filing dateDec 21, 1937
Priority dateDec 21, 1937
Publication numberUS 2219807 A, US 2219807A, US-A-2219807, US2219807 A, US2219807A
InventorsBuxton Warner R
Original AssigneeBuxton Warner R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flexible pocket receptacle
US 2219807 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Oct. 29, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT or ies 3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in flexible pocket receptacles of the type which are foldable to superpose one part upon another.

The invention is more particularly directed to and has for an object the provision of an improved means for applying a lining or ornamental facing to a relatively large area of the inner face of one of the leather walls of the flexible pocket receptacle, characterized in that the lining is so mounted that it will remain smooth and free from puckers and waves.

It has been customary, heretofore, to turn over the edge portions of a leather wall to form narrow, stripe-like linings along the margins of the inner face of the outer wall of the receptacle. These turned-over parts are first skived down into exceedingly thin form and then fastened by adhesive to the wall. The success of this method of lining a wall depends on the thinness to which the lining is cut. It must be out very thin. While this may be done with narrow areas, such as the stripe-like marginal portions referred to, it is not so easily accomplished if the area to be lined is relatively large, such as the entire width of the wall, for example. The cutting of the wide lining to sufificient thinness presents difficulties and involves an operation which is expensive and adds materially to the cost of the product. However, even if the leather is cut thin enough to enable it to be fastened adhesively, the result is not satisfactory. The adhesive is likely to show through the thin lining in spots and mar its finish and thus the appearance of the article. Also, it is difficult to fasten a large area of lining by adhesive and keep the lining smooth and free from puckers and waves. The continual folding of the pocket receptacle will cause puckering adjacent the line of fold, even if the lining is originally smooth at that location, and instead of a sharp and clearcut line of fold, there will be an irregular bandlike area without clear-cut boundaries and this detracts materially from the appearance of the article.

This invention provides a lining which is not fastened adhesively and therefore does not have to be cut thin. As a matter of fact, relatively heavy leathers may be used because the lining is not fastened except along a single line, which coincides with the line of fold of the wall. The rest of the lining remains unattached to the outer wall but it remains flatly and smoothly thereagainst, being free at all times to adjust itself as may be necessary relatively to the wall which it lines.

Other objects will appear'from the following description and will be pointed out in the appended claims. V

The invention will be disclosed withreference to the accompanying drawing, in which: 7 '5 Figs. 1 and 2 are top plan and front elevational views, respectively, of a flexible pocket receptacle embodying the invention; and

Fig. 3 is a sectional view thereof taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1. a 10 The receptacle is constructed of leather or other suitable flexible material. It includes an outer wall It, substantially rectangular in shape, and having a centrally-located line of fold .H' about which one half of the wall may be swung 15 into superposed relationwith the other half. The inner wall includes two end sections I2, located one on each side of the line of fold II in longitudinally spaced relation, leaving between their inner and adjacent edges i3 a space 26 through which a portion of the outer wall is visible. The opposite edges M of the sections l2 coincide one with each of the end edges of. the outer wall and each section is secured, as

by stitching l5, to the outer wall along the 25' edge I 4. The lower edge N5 of eachsection coincides with the lower edge of the outer Wall and the sections are secured to the outer wall, as by stitching I'Lalong such edge. If pockets are desired, in addition to the compartments af- 30' fo-rded between the sections l2 and wall It, additional leather pieces, such as I8 and H! are mounted in superposed relation on each section I2 and. held in place by the stitchings described. The upper edge of each section I2 is not secured to the outer wall so that access to thepocket therebetween may be had from the upper end or inner side thereof. Likewise, papers or the like may be inserted from above or from the inner side of each pocket formed between the parts I2 and H3 or the parts l8 and I9.

According to the preferred and usual use, papers do not extend from one side to the other of the case, across the line, of fold IL, Thus, an intermediate inner wall section for the purpose of bridging the gap between thesections I2 is not required. However, the use of such an intermediate section, if and when required, is not necessarily excluded although the invention has its greatest field in cases, such as that illustrated,

where no intermediate inner wall section is used.

It has been usual, as above pointedout, to turn over a portion of the upper and lower edges of the outer wall to formnarrow facing strips such as 20, These portions, first skived down into exceedingly thin form, are secured to the outer wall by adhesive. The success of this method of forming an ornamental facing or lining for the inner face of the outer wall depends on the thinness to which the turned-over portions are cut. Narrow strips, such as 20, may be cut down sufliciently thin by skiving whereas a broad area, such as the entire width of the outer wall, could not be faced in this manner.

According to this invention, a lining member 23 of leather is. provided on the inner face of wall I and secured thereto along a single line, which coincides with the line of fold H of said wall. The lining may be secured by stitching 24 along said line. It is not necessary that the leather lining be thin. It may be, and desirably is, relatively heavy, the better to accomplish the desired result of having it lie smooth and flat.

If unusually heavy, the 1eather lining may be scored or creased along the line of fold prior to fastening it in place by stitching. In this way, a lining for the entire area exposed between the edges I3 is provided. It is preferably made to overlap the usual marginal linings 20 and also it should likewise overlap the end sections I2, extending normally between such sections and wall Hi. It need not, however, in all cases, overlap such sections to the extent herein illustrated.

This member 23 has utility apart from its function as a lining. It may be used to partitionthe compartments formed between the sections [3 and wall l0. Papers may be placed in either of these compartments and retained securely between the lining and the outer wall. For such use, the lining needs to extend to a substantial distance into each compartment, nearly to the outer edge thereof, along the top of the compartment. But the lining must also be easily withdrawable and yet not accidentally displaceable from the compartment. To this end,-

the outer ends of the lining are shaped as shown. Each half portion of the lining is widest at its top and narrowest at its bottom and slopes downwardly. and inwardly between these points. In this way, each half of the lining extends into its compartment to different distances decreasing progressively from. top to bottom to compensate for the progressive resistance to withdrawal of the flap as the lower closed end of the compartment is approached.

It is likewise possible to withdraw either half of the lining from its compartment and insert it between the sections l2 and I8 for the purposes similar to that described.

The invention thus affords a simple, inexpensive yet very eifective means for lining the exposed portions of the inner face of a wall ofa pocket receptacle. The lining, being fastened only along the line offold, can move if and when necessary to adjust itself relatively to the outer wall and remain flatly thereagainst, free from puckering. Puckering of the lining at the line of fold is naturally entirely prevented. Such a lining overcomes the difiiculties heretofore experienced and enables better, heavier, more serviceable and better appearing linings to be provided without any but a nominal cost for mounting the lining in place.

What I claim is:

1. A flexible pocket receptacle, comprising, outer and inner walls of leather or the like, the outer wall having intermediate its ends a trans verse line of fold enabling one part to be superposed upon the other, the inner wall including longitudinally-spaced end sections located one on each side of said line of fold with a portion of the inner face of the outer Wall exposed between them, said sections secured along their outer end edges and lower side edges to the end edges and lower side edge of the outer wall, and a member superposed directly upon the central portion of the inner face of said outer wall and covering said exposed portion, said member having a line of fold coinciding exactly with the line of fold of the outer wall and extending in opposite directions from its line of fold between said sections and the outer wall in partially overlapping relation with said sections, said member being secured directly to the outer wall along the one line of said coinciding lines of fold and being secured only to said wall and only along said one line.

2. A flexible pocket receptacle, comprising, outer and inner walls of leather or the like, the outer wall having intermediate its ends a transverse line of fold enabling one part to be superposed upon the other, the inner wall including longitudinally-spaced end sections located one on each side of said line of fold with a portion of the inner face of the outer wall exposed between them, said sections secured along their outer end edges and lower side edges to the end edges and lower side edge of the outer wall, and a member superposed directly upon the central portion of the inner face of said outer wall and covering said exposed portion, said member having a line of fold coinciding exactly with the line of fold of the outer wall and extending in opposite directions from its line of fold between said sections and the outer wall in partially overlapping relation with said sections, said member being secured directly to the. outenwall along the one line of said coinciding lines of fold and being secured only to said wall and only along said one line, each of the overlapping portions of said member having the greatest amount of overlap near its upper edge and the least amount near its lower edge, the free end edges of said member sloping progressively downwardly and inwardly from top to bottom toward said coinciding lines of fold.

3. A flexizle pocket receptacle, comprising outer and inner walls of leather or the like, the outer wall having intermediate its ends a transverse line of fold enabling one part to be superposed upon the other, the inner wall including end sections positioned on opposite sides of said line of fold and spaced therefrom, said sections being secured along their outer end edges and lower side edges to the end edges and lower side edges of the outer wall to form right and left compartments open at their top and adjacent sides, and a member secured intermediate its ends to the inner face of the outer wall along said line of fold to provide oppositely extending free portions hinged to the back wall at said line of fold for movement into and out of the adjacent compartments, said extending portions when insaid compartments dividing the latter into rearcompartments open at the top only and forward cornpartments open at both the top and inner edge, said extending portions decreasing in width from a maximum width at the top to a minimum width at the bottom, said minimum bottom width be-v ing at least equal to the distance between the inner wall sections.

WARNER R. BUXTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439731 *Mar 14, 1944Apr 13, 1948Buxton IncFlexible pocket receptacle having pivotally supported units
US2520176 *Dec 21, 1945Aug 29, 1950Stanley Leopold GPocket wallet or letter case
US2596131 *Aug 8, 1947May 13, 1952ThomasCombination bookholder and pocket construction
US2946604 *Jul 15, 1957Jul 26, 1960Hunger James CFolder cover
US3058506 *Nov 14, 1960Oct 16, 1962Classic Plastics IncSecret pocket for billfolds and the like
US3777795 *Jan 24, 1972Dec 11, 1973Graetz HMulti-pocket card holder and wallet structure
US3847195 *Jun 29, 1973Nov 12, 1974Robertson Paper Box CoCheck wallet and blank for forming same
US4105057 *Sep 23, 1977Aug 8, 1978Amity Leather Products CompanyFlexible receptacle with credit card holder
US4907634 *Apr 29, 1988Mar 13, 1990Yoo Eddie BWallet-organizer
DE916693C *Nov 1, 1949Aug 16, 1954Allis Chalmers Mfg CoVorrichtung zur Veraenderung der Spurweite von Fahrzeugen
Classifications
U.S. Classification150/147
International ClassificationA45C1/00, A45C1/06
Cooperative ClassificationA45C1/06
European ClassificationA45C1/06