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Publication numberUS2220439 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1940
Filing dateApr 11, 1938
Priority dateApr 11, 1938
Publication numberUS 2220439 A, US 2220439A, US-A-2220439, US2220439 A, US2220439A
InventorsBlock Alexander E
Original AssigneeBlock Alexander E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable shoe
US 2220439 A
Images(6)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nay. 5, 1940.

A. E). BITOCK 2,220,439

ADJUSTABLE SHOE Filed April 11, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet l NOV. 5, 19.40. BLOCK 2,220,439

ADJUSTABLE SHOE Filed April 11, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 zxMaW Nov. 5, 1940.

A. E. BLOCK ADJUSTABLE SHOE Filed April 11, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 NOV. 5, 1940. BLQQK 2,220,439

ADJUSTABLE 'S'HOE Filed April 11, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 /A l EN7'0E" F74 EXANDEE E 5106K,

4rroeA EK NOV. 5, 1940. BLOCK 2,220,439

ADJUSTABLE SHOE Filed April 11, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 //v l fA/fo .e: 44 EXA N05? 5. 5106A:

Nov. 5, 1940. .A. E. BLOCK 2,220,439

ADJUSTABLE SHOE Filed April 11, 1938 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 w 2. w [7 ,6 34 ,1 4 3/1 I .3

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Z/Z 2/5 ma Z04 5 5x4 M052 5. 54 oc/g Patented Nov. 5, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 19 Claims.

The present invention relates generally to adjustable shoes, and more particularly-to an adjustable shoe which includes a built-in main carrier which has facilities for receiving and does receive a plurality of pads and secondary carriers and for retaining in received position such pads and secondary carriers. i

It is well known that in modern shoe manufacturing shoes are constructed according to series of standard patterns. Some attempts have been made to construct shoes which incorporate features adapted to relieve foot strain, but in conventional construction a shoe of a specific size has a specific length, width, height, toe space, and.

sole contour. Every individual having a foot requiring a size '7-A shoe necessarily must wear a. shoe having the same specifications, regardless of the individual requirements of the foot.

Many attempts have been made to provide special sole contours to meet the requirements of specific feet-through the use of insertsof various kinds. However, the obstacle immediately encountered is the lack of space required to receive the insert or inserts, particularly where such compensating device must be of relatively great thickness. Of course, shoe uppers can be stretched to a certain degree, but this obviously'is not a very satisfactoryway of obtaining additional space, for quite often the upper is damaged, the stitching being broken or the leather hopelessly distorted.

As a shoe is worn, depressions gradually form in the insole due to excessive bearing pressure at points beneath the os calcis, the base of the fifth metatarsal, the heads of the five metatarsals, and at other points. The number and depth of the depressions vary with the individual foot. Further, as the shoe is worn, the outer sole becomes thinner along the outer edge, the inner edge, or the end, and the heel becomes thinner at the rear or to one side or the other. As in the case of the depressions in the insole, the exterior wear of the shoe varies with the individual foot. As previously stated, inserts have been employed for many years, but even where sufficient space is ;obtained the results obtained have not been completely successful due to the inappropriateness of the configurations and contours of the ,inserts, the difficulties of keeping the inserts in selected positions, and to the failure of the user to secure correct adjustments from time to time. The fact must not be overlooked that the mere insertion of a pad or insert into a shoe is temporary at best, for the continued wear of i the shoe inevitably brings change to the shoe, to the pad, and to the foot.

It must be appreciated that both bone and flesh are under consideration. Changes in the foot continuously occur due to making and breaking of adhesions and the shifting of bones. These changing conditions, which increase or decrease the external size of the foot, must be synchronized to conditions of change in a shoe encasing the foot.

' A shoe improperly fitted to a foot inevitably results in actual damage to the foot in the form of corns, callouses, bunions, and the like, and to the whole system due both to faulty blood and nerve circulation and pressure on the nerves of the foot. It is recognized today in the medical world that properly fitted feet are a most important contribution to health. It is becoming more and more recognized that properly fitted feet means not just the initial adjustment of a pair of feet to a pair of shoes, but the continued adjustment of the shoes to the feet as variations develop in the latter and conditions of Wear develop in the former. Further, it is now appreciated that support for the fiesh of the foot is very important.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide an adjustable shoe which'is adapted to be initially adjusted to the requirements of a specific foot, and which can be maintained in adjustment relative to such foot during the life of the shoe.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe, the foot space of which is adapted to be made smalleror larger according to the requirements of the foot upon which it is worn.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe, any part of the foot space of which is adapted to be made smaller or larger according to the requirements of the foot upon which it is worn without affecting the other parts of said foot space,

Another object is to provide an'adjustable shoe which includes means for-supporting both the fleshy portions and the honey portions of a foot according to the specific requirements thereof. Another objectis to provide an adjustable shoe in which the foot space at the'ball of the foot under the metatarsal heads can be increased, and in which means for adjustment of the metatarsals is included.

Another object is to provide an adjustableshoe comprising a main carrier having means for receiving inserts under substantially the full area of the foot including the heads of the metatarsals, access being obtainable to all of said inserts at anytime.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe which includes a main carrier which is adapted to receive and maintain in received position a plurality of inserts selectively located from the rearmost edge of the heel to well under the metatarsal heads of a foot.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe which includes a main carrier of a. configuration conforming to the outline of the insole throughout the major extent of the latter, but which terminates at or near a convex line just rearwardly of the convex line formed by the toes of the foot of a wearer.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe which includes a main carrier having a. plurality of readily accessible pockets which are adapted to and do receive selected pads.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe which includes a main carrier having means to receive and to maintain in received position pads, inserts and secondary carriers and their inserts to vary the contour of the foot-receiving surface of the shoe to meet any foot requirement throughout the full area thereof.

Another object is to provide a shoe insert which includes means for initially adjusting the footbearing surface of the shoe to the requirements of the foot and for maintaining the foot-bearing surface in adjustment with the requirements of the foot during the life of the insert.

Another object is to provide an adjustable shoe comprising a built-in device which underlies the heads of the outer metatarsals on a substantially fiat plane above the heads of the inner metatarsals and the inner side of the heel on a substantially flat plane above the outer side of the heel.

Another object is to provide an insert which supports the foiward portions of the outer metatarsals on a substantially fiat plane above the forward portions of the inner metatarsals and the inner side of the heel on a substantially flat plane above the outer side of the heel.

Another object is to provide a plurality of inserts of predetermined configurations.

Another object is to provide a carrier insert for a shoe having a plurality of pockets and holders and a plurality of inserts of configurations suitable for dispositions in said pockets and holders.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from the following description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a main carrier which comprises the major feature of'the novel adjustable shoe forming the subject matter of the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a bottom view of the main carrier shown in Fig. 1, a portion of the bottom piece being broken away for the purpose of clarity;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the main carrier shown in Fig. 1, the cover thereof being raised in a manner to disclose certain of the pockets and stationary holders, a removable carrier insert being shown in one of the holders;

Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 isa section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is another perspective view of the main carrier, the cover and certain of the holders and pockets being turned back for clarity of illustration;

Fig. '7 is a perspective view of the removable carrier insert shown in position inFigs. 3 and 6;

Fig. 8 is another perspective view of the main carrier shown in Fig. 1, certain .of the holders and pockets being turned back for clarity of illustration, a reversible longitudinal arch insert being shown in dotted lines in its pocket with the broad portion forwardly disposed;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of a portion of the main carrier showing the reversible inner longitudinal arch insert in its pocket with the broader portion thereof rearwardly disposed;

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of the reversible inner longitudinal arch insert, which is shown in its operative positions in Figs. 8 and 9;

Fig. 11 is another perspective view of the main carrier, a heel and arch insert being shown in its operative relationship with a holder;

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of an anterior insert;

Fig. 13 is a perspective view of the forward portion of the main carrier showing the anterior insert of Fig. 12 in its pocket;

Fig 14 is a perspective view of the rear portion of the main carrier showing an arch insert in its operative relation thereto;

Fig. 15 is a perspective view of the rear portion of the main carrier showing an outer longitudinal arch and heel insert in operative position.

Fig. 16 is a perspective view of the arch insert which is shown in operative relation to the main carrier in Fig. 14;

Fig. 17 is a plan view of a strap employed to maintain certain of the inserts in selected positions;

Fig. 18 is a perspective view of the rear portion of the main carrier showing the strap of Fig. 17 in operative relation thereto;

Fig. 19 is a bottom view of the main carrier and a footshowing the relationship of the forward end of the main carrier and the toes of the foot;

Fig. 20 is a view of the adjustable shoe comprising -the present invention, partly in side elevation, partly in section, parts being broken away for clarity, showing the relationship of the main carrier to the little toe and to the skeleton of a foot;

Fig. 21 is a plan view of a main carrier forming a part of .an adjustable sandal;

Fig. 221's a bottom view of the main carrier shown in Fig. 21;

Fig. 23 is a perspective view of a heel insert;

Fig. 24 is a perspective view of the main carrier shown in Fig. 21, the cover and certain of the pockets and holders being thrown back for the purpose of clarity, showing the insert of Fig. 23 in operative disposition relative thereto;

Fig.25 is aperspective view of a modification of the heel insert of Fig. 23;

Fig. 26 is a perspective view of the main carrier shown in Fig. 1 disclosing a second type of removable carrier in operative disposition relative thereto;

Fig 27 is a section onthe line 21-21 of Fig. 20 taken at an acute angle to the longitudinal to cut the five metatarsals;

Fig. 28is a section on the line 28-48 of Fig. 20;

Fig. 29'is a plan view of a carrier forming a part of another modified adjustable shoe constructed in accordance with the concepts of the present invention;

Fig. 30 is a section on the line 3030 of Fig. 29;

Fig. 31 is a section on the line 3 |3l of Fig. 29;

. Fig. 32 is a plan view of a carrier forming a part of another modified adjustable shoe constructed in accordance with the concepts of the present invention;

Fig. 33 is a section on the line 33-33 of Fig. 32;

Fig. 34 is asecticn on the line 3434 of Fig. 32; and,

Fig. 35 is a perspective view of an insert adapted to be used with the carrier shown in Fig. 32.

Referring to the drawings more particularly by reference numerals, there is shown in Fig. 20 as a preferred embodiment of the present invention an adjustable shoe 30. The shoe 36 includes an upper 3|, a heel 32, an outsole 33, an insole 34, and a main carrier 35. The main carrier 35 is sewed to the insole by the threads 36 at the forward part thereof, and is secured thereto by the heel nails 31 at the rearward portion thereof. As Figs. 19 and 20 clearly show the main carrier 35 terminates short of the little toe 38. However, the main carrier 35 can be built with forward material extending under the toes, but it is not to be considered a toe support.

In Fig. 20 there is also shown the relationship of the outer side of the skeleton of a left foot to the main carrier 35. The skeleton A includes little toe bones a a and a a fifth metatarsal b, a cuboid c, and ankle bone (1, and a heel bone or os calcis e.

The main carrier 35 is shown in Figs. 1-19 apart from the adjustable shoe 30 for clarity of illustration. In the fundamental concept of the present invention the main carrier 35 is an integral part of an adjustable shoe. However, the main carrier 35 as an insert is contemplated as within the scope of the present invention.

It is clear from an inspection 'of Figs. 1, 2 and 19 that the outline of the main carrier 35 is the same as the outline of the insole 34, with the exception that the former terminates short of the forward extent of the latter. In Fig. 19 the relationship of the front end of the main carrier 35 and the toes of a foot is shown.

The main carrier 35 includes a cover 40 and a base 4| (Figs. 3 and 4). A small pocket 42 is formed on the forward portion'of the cover 46 by a portion of the cover 40 as one wall and by the piece 42 as the other wall, the piece 42 being attached to the cover 40 by stitches 43 and 44 (Fig. l). A second small pocket 45 of substantially the same configuration as the pocket 42 is formed on the cover 40 by portions of the cover 40 and the piece 42' as one wall and by a piece 45' as the other wall, the piece 45' being attached by stitches 46 to the pocket 42 and by stitches 41 to the cover 48. The pocket 45 is angularly disposed relative to the pocket 42 and overlies a considerable portion of it. Each of the pockets 42 and 45 has a tab 48 in which there is a series of slots 49, and each is open at the forward and rear ends.

Anterior pockets 50, 5| and 52 extend beyond the forward edge 53 of the cover 40, and the defining walls are stitched to the cover 40, to the base 4 I, and to each other.

Specifically, the pocket 50 is defined by an upper piece 54 and a lower piece 55. The upper piece 54 is attached to the cover 40 by stitching 56 disposed intermediate the ends of the piece 54, and is attached to the lower piece 55 by stitching 51 along the forward edge of the former and by stitching 58 along the outwardly disposed edges towards the rear extremities (Figs. 1 and 3). The upper piece 54 has slots 59 for a purpose to be described. The piece 55 has similar slots (not shown). The pocket 50, therefore, is open along .both sides and at the rear. The piece 54 extends rearwardly beyond the piece 55 in the form of a tab 54' which can be folded under to provide a thin insert and to maintain an insert in place in the pocket 5!].

The pocket 5| is defined by a lower piece 6|] and the piece 55 which forms the lower wall of the pocket 50 (Fig. 3). The lower piece 60 is attached to the piece 55 by stitching 6|, the for- Ward edge of the former terminating a fraction of an inch short of the forward edge of the latter in order to feather the forward end of the main corner 35. The lower piece 50 is attached to the base 4| by stitching 62, and is additionally secured to the piece 55 by the stitching 58, which passes through the three superposed pieces 54, 55 and 50. It is thus apparent that the pocket 5| is open along both sides and at the rear.

,The pocket 52 is defined by an upper piece 65 having slots 64 and a lower piece 66 which are connected along the forward edges by stitching 61 and along the outer edges towards the rear extremities by stitching 68. The upper piece 65 is connected to the cover 48 bystitching 69. The lower piece 66 is connected to the base 4| by stitching 78. The pocket 52 is, therefore, open on both sides and at the rear. The pocket 52 may be omitted if preferred, and the ends of the cover 40 and the base 4| sewed tog-ether up to the pockets 50 and 5|.

A holder tab ll of generally rectangular configuration (Figs. 8 and 11) is fastened to the base 4| by stitching 12 (Fig. 2). The holder tab includes a plurality of transversely disposed slots 73 for a purpose to be described,

A rearwardly disposed arch and heel pocket 75 (Figs. 5 and 8) is defined by the base 4| and a flap 16 which is connected to the base 4| by transverse stitching 11 (Fig. 2). The flap 16 is of the configuration of that portion of the base 4| with which it is superposed. The pocket 15 is open at two sides and at the rear end.

An inner longitudinal arch pocket (Figs. 8 and 9) is defined by the flap l6 and the base 4| as the lower wall and by a half moon piece 8! as the upper wall. The piece 8| is attached to the flap l6 and to the base 4| by the arcuate stitching 82, which follows the arcuate edge of the piece 8|. Hence, the pocket 85 is open at the outwardly disposed edges.

An inner longitudinal arch and heel pocket 84 (Figs. 5 and 9) is defined by portions of the fiap l6 and the half moon piece 8| as the lower wall, and by an elongated piece 85 as the upper wall. The elongated piece 85 is attached to the half moon piece 8| by stitching 85 and additionally to the half moon piece BI and to the flap '56 by stitching 87 (Fig. 8), the latter stitching extending longitudinally of the main carrier 35. The pocket 84, therefore, is open along the outer edge and at the rear. The outer and rear edges of the elongated piece 85 are of a configuration which follows that of the corresponding portion of the base 4|.

A long outer longitudinal arch and heel pocket 89 (Figs. 5 and 8) is defined by portions of the base 4|, the fiap E6, the half moon piece 8!, and the elongated piece 85 as the lower wall thereof, and by the forward portion of a long piece 90 and a short piece 9| as the upper wall thereof. The long piece 58 is attached to the base 4|, the half moon piece 8|, and the elongated piece 85 by stitching 92 which follows the forward end and inwardly disposed edge of the long piece 90. The short piece 9| is attached to the long piece by transverse stitching 93 and by longitudinal stitching 94 which follow, respectively, the forward end and the inwardly disposed edge of the short piece 9I. The long piece 90 has a series of slots 95 and spaced pairs of slits 96 and 91, the pair of slits 96 being of greater length than the pair of slits 91. The short piece 9I has a series of slots 98. The pocket 89 is open along the outwardly disposed edge and at the rearend.

A short outer arch and heel pocket I00 (Figs. 5, 6, and 8) is defined by the short piece 9| as the lower wall and by the rearward portion of the long piece 90 as the upper wall. From the foregoing description of the long piece 90 and the short piece 9| it is apparent that the pocket I00 is open along the outwardly disposed edge and the rear end.

A study of the drawings taken in conjunction with the foregoing description of the carrier 35 shows that the several pockets and holders are disposed in a system of overlapping or superposed relationship. It is believed that these several overlapping relationships are sufficiently clear without the necessity of further pointing out the same.

In Fig. 6 a removable carrier insert I35 (Fig. 7) is disposed in a selected relationship to the holder tab 1|. The insert I35, which is biplanar, is of the generally wedge-shaped configuration shown in Fig. 7, the wide end I36 being skived along the lower surface. The insert I35 has pockets I31, I38, I39, and I40, which are defined by the upper surface of the insert I35 and a piece MI, by portions of the piece MI and the insert I35 and a piece I42, by portions of the piece I42 and the insert I35 and a piece I43, and by portions of the piece I43 and the insert I35 and a piece I44, respectively. The pieces I4I, I42, I43, and I 44 are maintained in the relationship shown in Fig. 7 relative to each other and to the insert I35 by stitching I45 and stitching I46. Stitching I4I', I42, and I43 closes a third side of the pockets I31, I38, and I39, respectively. The pocket I40, however, is open along two opposite sides, the opening adjacent the edge of the insert I35 being preferably narrower than the other opening. The pockets I31, I38, I39, and I40 are disposed in overlapping relation along an arcuate line, and receive inserts of a configuration to conform to the respective interiors thereof. An insert I40 is shown in dotted lines in position in the pocket I40, the insert I40 being of substantially oval configuration, peripherally bevelled, and biplanar. It extends to the edge of the insert I35 through the outer opening in the pocket I40. Referring back to Fig. 6 it is evident that the insert I35 is maintained in its selected position by the insertion of a narrowed end I41 into one of the slots 13. The insert I35 underlies the fleshy part of the foot rearwardly of the ball and the forward portions of the longitudinal arches.

In Fig. 6 there is shown a biplanar insert I48 (Fig. 23) disposed in the pocket I00. The insert I 48 is preferably of a configuration to conform to the outline of the pocket I00 and includes a tongue I49, shoulders I50 contiguous thereto, an outwardly disposed vertical edge I5I, a portion of which is convex, and an inwardly disposed straight edge I52 which is beveled at I53. In Fig. 6 the tongue I49 of the insert I48 is shown disposed through a selected slot 95. In Fig. 25 is shown a biplanar insert I48 which varies from the insert I48 in that the former is cut away at I54. The inserts I48 and I48 underlie the outer portion of the heel.

In Figs. 8 and 9 a reversible insert I28 (Fig. 10) is shown disposed in the pocket 80. Theinsert I28 includes a broad portion I29 and a narrow extension I30. The insert I28,'which is biplanar, isvertical along an outwardly disposed edge' 'I3I and is beveled. at I32 along an irregular inwardly disposedredge-I33.1-InFig.8 the insert I28 is disposed with thebroad portion I29 forwardly and underlyingtheinnercuneiform and the rearward portion of the firstmetatarsal, whereas in Fig. 9 the'broa'djp'ortion I29 is disposed rearwardly and underlying-thev scaphoid, thereby illustrating its reversibility. i

IniFig'.'1l'a biplanar heel and arch insert III, which isof the configuration of the base 4| along the sides and rear end and which has a tongue H2 and shoulders I I3, is'shown disposed with the tongue- I I2 in one of vthe slots 13 with the shoulders I I3 abutting the extremities of said slot to maintain the insert III in its selected position. The insert III underlies the heel and the rearward portions of the longitudinal arches.

In Fig. 13'. an insert I05 (Fig. 12) is shown disposed intheanterior pocket 50. The insert I05 is of a configuration to conform to the pocket 50 and is biplanar. It is beveled at I06 and I01, the edge I08 being vertical. A shoulder I09 and a tongue IIO are provided. The tongue H0 is adapted to extend through one of the slots 59, the shoulder I09 limiting this insertion (Fig. 13). The insert I05 underlies the forward portions of the outer metatarsals and the fleshy portions immediately forwardly and rearwardly thereof.

A pad of a configuration similar to that of the pad I05 is provided for each of the pockets 5| and 52. The tongue of an insert placed in the pocket 5I can either extend through the slots 59 or through slots in the layer 55 (not shown).

'In Fig. 14 a biplanar arch support insert I20 (Fig. 16) is shown in position relative to the pocket 80. The insert I20 is of half moon configuration having the straight inwardly disposed edge I2I and the arcuate outwardly disposed edge I22, which define the forward and rearward points I23 and I24, respectively. The inwardly disposed edge I2I is beveled at I25, whereas the outwardly disposed edge I 22 is vertical. An internal flap portion I26 is provided by the incision I21.

From Fig. 14 it is clear that the internal flap portion I26 extends into the pocket 80, whereas the major portion of the insert I20 overlies the elongated piece and portions of the long piece and the half moon piece 8|. The insert I20 extends beyond the inner edge of the main carrier 35 and is adapted to rest against the inner side of a shoe upper to provide an arch support. The insert I20 extends sufficiently rearwardly to underlie the inner portion of the heel.

In Fig. 18 a biplanar insert H5 is shown disposed in the deep slits 96 located in the long piece 90. The insert H5 is of the configuration shown in Fig. 15, both the forward and rear ends being pointed, the former being defined by a convex portion of the inwardly disposed edge H6 and a concave portion of the outwardly disposed edge I", and the latter being defined by a straight portion of the inwardly disposed edge I I6'and a convex portion of the outwardly disposed edge H1. The edge H6 is beveled at I I8 throughout its length,'whereas the edge H1 is vertical. The insert II5 underlies the outer portion of the heel and the outer longitudinal arch.

In Fig. 26 an elongated biplanar carrier insert I55 is shown disposed above the plane of the long piece 90. Theinsert I55 is'of an outline along the inner and outeredges and the rear end to conform toxthe corresponding outline of the base II I in the pockets 5I and 52.

4|. The insert I55has pockets I56 and I51,.which are defined, respectively, by a portion of the upper surface of .the insert I55'and a piece I58, and by portions of the upper surface of the insert I55 and the upper surface of the piece I58 and a piece I59. The piece I58 is attached to the insert I55 by spaced longitudinal stitching I60 and I6I (the latter not shown). The piece I59 is attached to the piece I58 by stitching I62 and to the insert I55 by stitching I63. Each of the pieces I58 and I59 includes a tab, I64 in which there is a plurality of slots I65. As can be readily seen from an inspection of Fig. 26 the pieces I58 and I59 are angularly disposed relative to each other. The insert I55 has slots I 66. The slots I66 are adapted to receive inserts similar to the carrier insert I35 or to the insert III. The pockets I56 and I51 are adapted to receive inserts of appropriate configuration. The carrier insert 155 underlies the heel and the longitudinal arches, serving as a filler. placements for the pockets 42 and 44 which are sometimes removed and then require replacement.

,In Fig. 17 there is shown a strap I68 constructed of suitable material which has slots I69 adjacent one end and which is formed as a hook I at the other end. In Fig. 18 the strap I68 is shown in operative disposition relative to the holder tab II and the flap 18. The strap I68 is used, on occasion, to maintain certain elements of the main carrier 35 and associated inserts in selected disposition.

In Figs. 21, 22, and 24 there is shown a main carrier I which forms the major feature of an adjustable sandal constructed in accordance with the concepts of the present invention. 'The main carrier I15 differs from the main carrier 35 only in that the main carrier I15 is cut away at I16, the cover 4| is beveled at I11 adjacent the cutaway I16, the holder tab- III of the main carrier 35 is omitted from the main carrier I15, and the piece 65' of the main carrier I15 is shorter than the corresponding piece 65 ofthe main carrier 35.

In Fig. 21 there is disclosed the relationship of the forward portions of the first metatarsal I80, the second metatarsal I8I, the third metatarsal I82, the fourth metatarsol I83, and the fifth metatarsal I84, when the insert I05 (Fig. 12) is in the pocket 50 (Fig. 13) there being no inserts The forward portions of the third metatarsal I82, the fourth metatarsal I83, and the fifth metatarsal I84 are elevated relative to the forward portions of the first metatarsal I80 and the second metatarsal I8I. This established relationship of the forward portions of the metatarsals relieves the strain on the second, third, and fourth metatarsals, placing the proper load upon the first and second metatarsols, thereby efiecting equal weight distribution and 1 causing the muscles of the inner border of the foot and calf to function normally, and thereby preventing damage to the shoe due'to overturning and injury to the foot'in the form of corns, callouses, bunions, muscle strain, and nerve stress. In some instances only the forward portions of the fourth and fifth metatarsals are raised, the insert in the pocket 50 being narrowed.

In Fig. 28 the inner side of the heel is elevated relative to the outer side thereof by the use of an insert disposed in the pocket 84. The os calcis or heel bone e is thereby in effect wedged which prevents. wobbling, which is so common where high heel shoes are worn. It must, of course, not be overlooked that the heel bone 6 is surrounded with flesh.

Its pockets I56 and I51 are re In Fig. 29 'there is shown a carrier I81 which forms the main feature of another adjustable shoebuilt inaccordance with the teachings of the present invention. The carrier I81 is of the configuration of the insole of the shoe throughout.

the major extent thereof, but terminates short of the forward portion thereof. The carrier I81 includes an extension I88 which is adapted to extend beneath the forward portions of the third,

fourth, and fifth metatarsals of the foot encased in the adjustable shoe of which the carrier I81 forms a part. The forward portion of the extension I88 is beveled at I89, the bevel I89 continuing across the front of the carrier I81. The extension I88 is raised above the main portion of the carrier I81, as is the rearward extension I88, which together provide a flat surface. The heel portion I99 of the carrier I81 has a flat raised portion I9I along the inner side in order to provide a support for the inner side of the heel. The cross sections comprising Figs. and 31 clearly demonstrate the foregoing.

In Fig. 32 there is shown a carrier I92 which forms the main feature of still anothermodification of the adjustable shoe forming the subject matter of the present invention. The carrier I92 is of substantially the same outline as the carrier I81 shown in Fig. 29 and includes a pocket I93 formed by a portion of the main body of the carrier I92 'and a piece I94 (Fig. 33) which is sewed to the carrier I92 by spaced transverse stitching I95 and I96 and longitudinal stitching 205. The pocket I93, therefore, is open at both sides, a slot I91 in the carrier I92 extends longitudinally thereof between the forward end of the carrier I92 and a point a short distance for-- wardly of the stitching I95 through which an insert I98 (Fig. is adapted to be inserted.

The insert I98 is preferably biplanar and of an outline to conform to the outline of the pocket I93. As is shown in Fig. 32, the rear edge 206 of the insert I98 extends rearwardly of the rearward terminus of the slot I91 when the insert I98 is in the pocket I93, thereby providing a lock. The insert I98 is beveled along the two ends and the inwardly disposed side, and in a preferred embodiment includes pockets 201 and 208, defined by a piece 209 and a portion of the insert I98 and by a piece 2) and portions of the insert I98 and the piece 209, respectively. The piece 209 is fixed to the insert I98 by transverse stitching 2I I. The piece 2I0 is fixed to the piece 209 by transverse stitching 2I2 and to the insert I98 by transverse stitching 2I3. The pockets 201 and 208 are thus open at opposed edges and are adapted to receive suitable inserts in overlapping relation.

A heel pocket I99 is provided which is defined by a portion of the carrier I92 and by a piece 200 which is stitched to the carrier I92 by transverse stitching 20I and' longitudinal stitching 202. The pocket I99, therefore, is open along one side and at the rear. The piece 200 can be lifted for positioning an insert 203 (Fig. 34)

' It is apparent'that raising the inner side of the heel and the heads of the outer metatarsals efiects perfect foot balance.

The elements comprising the main carrier 35 and the inserts employed in conjunction therewith are constructed of suitable material. In a preferred embodiment the tab is of leather, the remaining elementsof the main carrier 35 are of fabric, and the inserts are of leather. The tab 40 is preferably of leather, inasmuch as it forms the actual bearing surface for the foot.

The remaining elements of the main carrier 35 are of fabric in order to keep to a minimum consistent with proper construction the thickness of these several elements so that the overall thickness of the main carrier without inserts will not be excessive. Other materials, of course, may be employed, since the material per se forms no part of the present invention.

The numerous pockets and tabs of the main,

carrier 35 have been described at length as to configuration and disposition, but it is to be understood that the specific configurations of these pockets and tabs shown and described may be varied without departing from the province of the present invention. The same point is applicable relative to the preferred specific configurations of the inserts shown and described.

The main carrier 35 is shown and described as the major feature of an adjustable shoe, but it is to be understood that the main carrier 35 employed as an insert for a conventional shoe is contemplated as being within the scope of the present invention.

Operation When the adjustable shoe 3!] forming the subject matter of the present invention is sold to a customer the bearing surface is adjusted to the requirements of the foot of the purchaser. Suitable inserts are placed in the appropriate pockets to provide a bearing surfacewhich gives comfort and proper support for the wearer, a condition which allows normal functioning of the foot and which strengthens themuscles thereof.

As the shoe 30 is worn by the purchaser the inevitable indentations gradually appear in the bearing surface and the sole and heel become thinner in certain areas. However,these indentations and points of wear are compensated by adjustment of the inserts placed in the main carrier 35 at the time of the original fitting of the shoeor by the insertion of additional inserts, so that the detrimental effects of the wear and tear on the shoe are never transmitted to the wearer. In other words, the adjustable shoe 3!] is refitted to the foot of a wearer from time to time throughout the life of the shoe.

It is obvious that, since the shoe forming the subject matter of the present inventi'on at all times properly fits the wearer, no corns, callouses, bunions, and the like, can develop on the foot of the wearer. Further, the blood and nerve circulation is maintained normal and the nerves of the foot are in no wise impaired. The wearer of the present shoe is never subjected to the necessity of hopping from one foot to another while standing to relieve pressure on the nerves of the foot or to restart the blood circulation. In other words, the bones of the feet and legs are maintained in normal position at 'all times.

It is to be understood that the present invention is not concerned with orthopedic surgery iappliances used in cases of fallen or dorsal flexed oes.

It is contemplated that the broad concept of the present invention includes the disposition of an insert between the inner and outer soles to raise the outer metatarsals. It further includes the hollowing out of a'last'for making a shoe having suflicient space for such insert without crowding the foot of a wearer.

It is apparent that there has been provided an adjustable shoe which achieves all of the objects and advantages sought therefor. However, the foregoing description and accompanying drawings have been given by way of illustration and example and not for purposes of limitation, the invention being limited only by the claims which follow.

What is claimed is: w

1. An adjustable shoe comprising a main carrier, said main carrier including a cover, a base, an outwardly opening anterior pocket, and an inwardly opening anterior pocket, a portion of each of said pockets being between the cover and the base and a portion of each extending forwardly of the cover and the base to a position to underlie the metatarsal heads of a foot.

2. An adjustable shoe comprising a main carrier, said main carrier including a base, apair of superposed outwardly opening longitudinally extending pockets, one of 7 said pockets being shorter than the other pocket, said shorter pocket including a wall having spaced pairs of slits extending inwardly from the free edge and internally disposed spaced slots.

3. An adjustable shoe comprising a main carrier, said maincarrier including a plurality of anterior pockets, a plurality of outwardly opening longitudinally extending pockets, and a'plurality of inwardly opening longitudinally extending pockets, said pockets being disposed in predetermined overlapping relationship to underlie the complete bearing surface of an inserted foot from under the metatarsal heads rearwardly.

4. An adjustable shoe comprising a carrier, said carrier including a main body, a portion raised above the plane of the main body and adapted to underlie the heads of the outer metatarsals of a foot, and a fiat portion raised above the plane of the main body adapted to underlie the inner side of the heel of a foot.

5. An adjustable shoe comprising means for supporting that portion of the foot underlying the metatarsal heads and that portion rearwardly thereof extending into the forward portion of the outer longitudinal arch on a plane above the remaining portion 'of the foot bearing surface, and means for maintaining said first means in fixed position.

6. A main carrier shoe insert including a plurality of anterior pockets, a plurality of out-' wardly opening longitudinally extending pockets, and a plurality of inwardly opening longitudinally extending pockets, said pockets being disposed in predetermined overlapping relationship to underlie the metatarsal heads of a foot and the complete bearing surface rearwardly thereof.

7. In a shoe, an insole having a substantially flat portion located therein and disposed to lie beneath the heads of the outer metatarsals of a foot, and to extend rearwardly thereof, the plane of said flat portion being above the plane of the adjacent portion of insole.

8. In a shoe, an insole having a substantially fiat portion located therein'and disposed to lie beneath the heads of the outer metatarsals of a foot, the plane of said flat portion being above the adjacent portion of insole,'and a second substantially flat portion disposed to lie beneath the inner portion of the heel of the foot, the plane of said second fiat portion being above the plane of the adjacent portion of insole.

9. A main carrier for a shoe comprising a cover, a base, and two superposed outwardly opening anterior pockets, a portion of each of said pockets extending forwardly of the cover and the base to a position to underlie the metatarsal heads'of a foot and a portion of each being between the cover and the base.

10. A main carrier for a shoe comprising a cover, a base, a pair of oppositely opening anterior pockets, a portion of each of which is between the cover and the base, and a pair of pockets attached to the inside of the cover, each of said latter pockets being disposed in overlapping relation to each other and to both of the anterior pockets.

11. An adjustable shoe comprising a main carrier, said main carrier including a base, and a longitudinally extending pocket having an opening along the edge of the carrier, said pocket including a defining wall having spaced pairs of slits therein.

12. An adjustable shoe comprising a main carrier, said main carrier including a base, a pair of superposed longitudinally extending pockets, each having an opening along the edge of the main carrier, one of said pockets including a defining wall having spaced pairs of slits extending inwardly from the free edge thereof.

13. A shoe comprising a substantially flat portion raised above the plane of the main body and adapted to underlie the heads of the outer metatarsals of a foot, and a substantially flat portion raised above the plane of the main body adapted to underlie the inner side of the heel of a foot.

14. A main carrier shoe insert of a configuration to underlie the major area of a foot including and rearwardly of the metatarsal heads, said carrier insert including pockets and holder tabs predeterminately disposed in superposed and overlapping relation to underlie the aforesaid foot-bearing surface, a portion of said carrier adapted to underlie the intermediate portion of the inner transverse arch being cut away.

15. An insert adapted to be cooperatively associated with a carrier inserted in a shoe, said insert being of a width to underlie a portion of a heel of a foot disposed within the shoe, said insert having substantially parallel surfaces and being cut away along one side to effect a well which is adapted to receive therein the protuberance of the heel bone, the interiorly disposed edge of said insert other than that portion forming the cut-away being substantially straight.

16. An insert adapted to be disposed within a shoe, said insert being of elongated configuration including a relatively wide forward portion and a relatively narrow rearward portion, said forward portion being adapted to underlie the heads of the outer metatarsals of a foot, said insert further having substantially parallel surfaces.

17. An insert adapted to be disposed within a shoe to lie beneath the inner longitudinal arch of a foot comprising a relatively wide portion and a relatively narrow portion, whereby said insert is adapted to be selectively received in a pocket of a main carrier to position the wide portion of the insert beneath the forwardly disposed protuberance of the heel 'bone or to position the narrow portion of the insert alongside the forwardly disposed protuberance of the heel bone to permit the protuberance to rest in the cut-away area.

18. A main carrier shoe insert comprising a cover, a base, a longitudinally disposed pocket having an opening along an edge of the carrier, said pocket being arcuate along the interior restricted edge, and an insert disposed in said pocket including a portion having an edge of an arcuate degree to be received by the pocket, and a narrow portion, said insert being adapted to be disposed in said pocket with the narrow portion disposed rearwardly thereof or forwardly thereof.

19. A main carrier shoe insert comprising a base, a pocket disposed on said base and adapted to underlie the heads of the outer metatarsals and to extend rearwardly thereof, said pocket including a defining wall having slits in the rearwardly disposed portion thereof, and an insert disposed within said pocket including means engaging a selected slit and having a portion underlying the heads of the outer metatarsals.

ALEXANDER E. BLOCK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2482333 *Aug 4, 1945Sep 20, 1949Everston Joseph HRemovable insert for shoes
US2641069 *May 7, 1951Jun 9, 1953Musebeck Shoe CompanyComposite innersole construction
US2680918 *Aug 14, 1952Jun 15, 1954Behner Edward TFootwear with self-contained heating unit
US2721403 *Aug 21, 1952Oct 25, 1955Quisling SverreOrthopedic support and blank therefor
US2734287 *Feb 15, 1955Feb 14, 1956 Maccarone
US2959875 *Nov 13, 1957Nov 15, 1960Frese Jr Albert CSlip-proof sock lining for shoes
US3067752 *Jan 2, 1959Dec 11, 1962SchallerShoe sole construction with flexible shank
US3084695 *Aug 1, 1961Apr 9, 1963O'donnell Charles EdwardMethod of making arch supporting cushion innersole
US3120231 *Oct 6, 1961Feb 4, 1964Gossweiler RudolfOrthopedic foot support
US3421518 *Aug 10, 1965Jan 14, 1969Simon J WiklerShoe construction having a sole provided with a shank stiffener and selective elevated bone supporting areas
US5138774 *May 13, 1991Aug 18, 1992Jeff SarkoziInsole with removable, height-adjustable stackable support pads
US7249426 *Aug 1, 2002Jul 31, 2007Calvani RomanoFootwear structure
US7461470Oct 26, 2005Dec 9, 2008The Timberland CompanyShoe footbed system and method with interchangeable cartridges
US7681333Oct 26, 2005Mar 23, 2010The Timberland CompanyShoe footbed system with interchangeable cartridges
US7762008Sep 7, 2006Jul 27, 2010The Timberland CompanyExtreme service footwear
EP0528130A1 *Jun 10, 1992Feb 24, 1993Red Wing Shoe Company, Inc.An adjustable child's shoe with a removable pad
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/164
International ClassificationA43B3/26, A43B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/26
European ClassificationA43B3/26