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Publication numberUS2220493 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1940
Filing dateJan 5, 1940
Priority dateJan 5, 1940
Publication numberUS 2220493 A, US 2220493A, US-A-2220493, US2220493 A, US2220493A
InventorsPixler Edgar F
Original AssigneePixler Edgar F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surgical instrument
US 2220493 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v NOV; 5, 1940. E F ERl A 2,220,493

SURGI CAL INS TRUMENT Filed Jan. 5. 1940 n VIII u l; ZEPLZZZQW l INVENTOR..

BY f

A TTORNE YS.

Patented Nov. 5, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFlcE SURGICAL INSTRUMENT Edgar F. Pixler, Leadville, Colo.

Application January 5, 1940, Serial No. 312,593

i l C'laims. (Cl. 275-24) This invention relates to surgical instruments, and more particularly to an instrument designed for removing liquids from the cavities of autopsied bodies.

An important object of the invention is to provide an instrument of this character which will accomplish its purpose readily and easily, and one which will prevent the hose or tube connected with the device from clogging, to impair the eiliciency of the instrument, by preventing pieces of tissue or semi-solids from entering the tube.

Another object of the invention is to provide a surgical instrument for removing liquids from cavities of autopsied bodies, which may be positioned without regards to skill and accuracy, the construction of the device insuringv the true operation of the instrument whether the instrument is submerged into all types of vsceras or inserted under the visceras.

Still another object of the invention isy to provide an instrument of the suction tube character wherein the shape of theV shield or guard will insure the maximum eiiiciency by permitting the suction tube to remain submerged when held in a comfortable position for the operator.

A further object of the invention'is to provide an adjustable tube Ywhich may be adjusted with respect to the guard or shield forming a part of the instrument, thereby permitting the very close removal of any liquids :from pockets, hollows or the bottoms of cavities.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, which will appear as the description proceeds, the invention resides in the combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invention herein described, may be made within the scope of what is claimed, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Referring to the drawing:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of a surgical instrument constructed in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged sectional view through the instrument, illustrating the guard.

Figure 3 is a similar longitudinal sectional view illustrating the adjustable tube as positioned for very close removal of liquids from pockets or cavities, in which the instrument is positioned.

Figure 4 is a sectional view taken on line 4 4 of Figure 3.

Referring to the drawing in detail, the body portion of the device is in the form of a tube indicated bythe reference character 5, the tube .being provided'with a disk-like enlargement 6 disposed in spaced relation with one end of the tube. A threaded flange indicated at 'l is formed on the disk-like enlargement 6 and is 5 adapted to receive the internal threads formed at the enlarged end oi the guard 8, whereby the guard may be readily and easily removed or replaced.

The guard is substantially inverted cone-shape, 10 the free end of the guard being iiat as at 9, and provided with openings I0'.

Openings II are formed in the guard and are arranged so that liquid may enter the guard at points throughout the length thereof, or at points 15 wherever the guard may lie directly over the liquid to be removed.

An enlargement indicated at I2 is formed on the body portion 5, at a point in spaced relation with the free end of the body portion, theen- 20 largement providing ka sto-p against which one end of the adjustable tubular section I3 engages to restrict inward movement of the adjustable tubular section I3. An arm indicated at I 4 eX- tends from the inner end of the adjustable tubular 25 section I3, and passes through an opening in the disk-like enlargement 6, where it is provided with a nger piece I5 whereby the arm and adjustable tubular section may be moved longitudinally of the body portion 5, to adjust the section I3.

When a close removal of liquids from pockets or cavities is desired, the tube I3 is moved to the position as shown by Figure 3 of the drawing. In this position, entrance of material through the openings II of the guard is pre- 35 vented, with the exception of the openings I0, which establish communication with the body portion and confine the suction through the body portion and guard, to a small area, to accomplish the purpose.

In the use of the device, the suction tube or hose from a vacuum bottle or tank, hydro-asperator suction pump or other device commonly used in connection with tubes of this character, and the end of the body portion carrying the 45 guard or shield, is inserted into the vsceras or positioned directly thereunder. The action of the suction device will now draw the liquids and semi-liquid material through the openings of the guard, and through the body portion and 50 tube connected therewith.

From the foregoing it will be seen that due to the construction of the shield or guard, it is unnecessary to accurately position the device to accomplish its purpose, and that by adjusting 55 the tube i3 of the device, a very close removal of any liquids will be assured.

What is claimed is:

l. A surgical instrument for removing liquids and semi-liquids from autopsied bodies, comprising a tubular body portion to which a suction tube is connected, and a guard housing on one end of the body portion and having openings formed therein permitting material to pass into the guard and the end of said body portion extending into the guard being open, whereby material entering the guard is drawn into the body portion when suction is created through the body portion.

2. A surgical instrument for removing liquids and semi-liquids from autopsied bo-dies, comprising a tubular body portionto which a suction tube is connected, a guard housing on' one end of the body portion, the guard being spaced from the body portion providing a passageway between the body portion and guard, said body portion having an open end, said guard having openings through which material may pass to the space between the guard and body portion and into the body portion through the open end thereof, when s ction is created through the` body portion.

3. A surgical instrument for removing liquids and semi-liquids from autopsied bodies, comprising a tubular body portion to which a suction tube is secured, an inverted frusto-conioal guard housing one end of the body portion, said guard having openings in the wall thereof through which material passes to the body portion, and said guard being spaced from the body portion providing a passageway between the body portion and guard, and the end of the body portion housed by said guard being open, whereby material entering the passageway may enter the body portion.

4. A surgical instrument for removing liquids and semi-liquids from autopsied bodies, comprising a tubular body portion to which a suction tube is secured, an inverted frusto-conical guard having openings in the wall thereof, positioned on one end of the body portion, an adjustable tubular section mounted on the free end of the body portion and adapted to move into engagement with the free end of the guard, cutting 01T certain openings of the guard and establishing communication with the body portion, through openings in one end of the guard, whereby material is drawn through the body portion when suction is created through the body portion.

5. A surgical instrument for removing liquids from autopsied bodies, comprising a tubular body portion to which a suction tube is secured, an inverted frusto-conical guard positioned on one end of the body portion and arranged in spaced relation therewith providing a passageway, said guard having openings in the wall thereof and having openings in the free end thereof, an adjustable tubular member on one end of the body portion adapted to move into engagement with the inner surface of the free end of the guard shutting off openings of the guard and establishing communication with the body portion through the openings in the free end of the guard, and said openings permitting material to pass into the body portion when suction is created through the body portion.

6. A surgical instrument for removing liquids from autopsied bodies, comprising a tubular body portion to which a suction tube is connected, a frusto-conical guard positioned on one end of the body portion and spaced therefrom, providing a passageway between the body portion and guard, the end of the body portion being spaced from the end of the guard, and means for cutting off certain of the openings of the guard restricting the suction created through the body portion to the openings in the free end of the guard.

7. A surgical instrument for removing liquids from autopsied bodies, comprising a tubular body portion to which a suction tube is secured, an inverted frusto-conioal guard positioned on one end of the body portion and having openings, said guard being supported in spaced relation with the body portion providing a passageway around the end ofthe bo'dy portion closed by said guard, and an adjustable member on the body portion and operating within the guard for cutting off certain of the openings of the guard and restricting the suction through the body portion to predetermined openings of the guard.

EDGAR F. PDQLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2604685 *Dec 22, 1948Jul 29, 1952Harm HarmsDouble tube trocar device
US4533345 *Jun 14, 1983Aug 6, 1985Fertility & Genetics AssociatesUterine catheter
US4767404 *Jul 14, 1986Aug 30, 1988R & S Associates Co.Attachemtn to a vacuum source for removal of surgical debris
US5368579 *Jul 23, 1992Nov 29, 1994Sandridge; James B.Perfusion controlled guiding catheter apparatus and method
US6386199 *Sep 29, 1999May 14, 2002David D. AlferyPerilaryngeal oral airway
US6983744Apr 5, 2004Jan 10, 2006Alfery David DPerilaryngeal oral airway with temperature sensor
US7013899Aug 13, 2004Mar 21, 2006Engineered Medical System, Inc.Perilaryngeal oral airway with multi-lumen esophogeal-obturator
US7776004Apr 17, 2007Aug 17, 2010Surgimark, Inc.Aspirator sleeve and suction handle
US7794421Dec 15, 2005Sep 14, 2010Surgimark, Inc.Aspirator sleeve and tip
US20070161963 *Jan 6, 2007Jul 12, 2007Smalling Medical Ventures, LlcAspiration thrombectomy catheter system, and associated methods
EP1364665A1 *May 20, 2003Nov 26, 2003Surgimark, Inc.Coupling device for attaching a sleeve to a surgical aspirator tip
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/239, 210/418, 27/24.2, 604/268
International ClassificationA61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M1/008
European ClassificationA61M1/00T