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Publication numberUS2220852 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 5, 1940
Filing dateMar 31, 1937
Priority dateMar 31, 1937
Publication numberUS 2220852 A, US 2220852A, US-A-2220852, US2220852 A, US2220852A
InventorsScott Archie W
Original AssigneeAmerican Fork & Hoe Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club shaft
US 2220852 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 5, 1940. w sco-r 2,220,852 2 I GOLF CLUB SHAFT A Filed March 51, 1937 INVENTOR. ARCHIE W. SCOTT Patented Nov.-1940 GOLF own SHAFT [Archie w. Scott, Geneva, Ohio, assignor to The American Fork & Hoe Company, Cleveland,

Ohio, a corporation of Ohio I Application March 31, 1937, Serial No. 134,131

10 claims. (cl. 273-80) My invention relates to golf club shafts, and relates more particularly to golf club shafts of the metallic tubular type.

It has been previously proposed to accentuate the flexibility of a tubular'metallic golf club shaft in the longitudinal intermediate region substantially below the hand grip carrying portion of the shaft, and more distantly spaced from the club head end ofthe shaft, in addition to the normal accentuated flexibility existing in shafts which are of progressively reduced diameters towards the club head supporting ends as the result of such reduction of diameter near the club head.

16 The patent to Barnhart, No. 2,050,554, dated August 11, 1938, represents one such proposal. involving the provision of a shaft having its lower portion tapered rather abruptly from-a mid portion of the shaft toward the club head 20 supporting end, and then proceeding in the opposite direction to the hand supporting shaft region the shaft is first substantially reduced in diameter, producing a shoulder followed by a substantially diametrically reduced shaft sec- 25 tion which, in one illustrated embodiment, proceeds without any further increase in diameter,

1. e., in substantially cylindrical form to the hand grip supporting end of the shaft, and in another embodiment, as it proceeds in the same direc- 30 tion, is progressively increased in diameter so that the hand grip supporting end of the-shaft is of substantially larger diameter than the initially reduced portion adjacent the shoulder.

My present invention relates to an improvement in shafts of this kind, in that the flexibility of the shaft is effected in the desired intermediate portion of the shaft at preferably two rather closely but substantially spaced portions 40 of the said intermediate region, whereby I am enabled to secure the desired results so far as l accentuation of flexibility in the desired intermediate portion of the shaft is concerned, 1. e., remote from the club head, without otherwise 45 disturbing the normal rate of taper of a golf club shaft throughout its length from the extreme end of the handle supporting portion to the extreme club head supporting tip portion of the shaft, and in such manner that the effect 50 of my improvement results in the shaft being more bendable resiliently when in use, at an intermediate portion of its length remote from the club head, thus achieving the so-called high-whip! characteristic which is highly de- 65 sirable and at the same time permitting the shaft to flex inother portions progressively more and more, proceeding downwardly from the hand grip supporting portion toward the club head supporting portion. v

However, very effective operating results may 5 be, secured in a shaft embodying the principles of my invention which is not tapered in itsportions' either above or below the said shoulder reduced portions.

My invention relates to golf club shafts disclosed in the said Barnhart patent, and in the pending applications for patent of Norman P. Vickery, Serial Nos. 674,530, 693,935,-and 741,116, filed June 6, 1933, October 17, 1933, and August 23, 1934, respectively.

For different players, depending upon the nature of their stroke, 1. e., the pattern of the movement of the club during the stroke and the relatively different velocities at diiferent portions of the stroke, more advantageous results may be achieved in shafts embodying my invention with the said diametrically reduced portions in dlfferent numbers and disposed somewhat differently than for other players, and my invention is susceptible for use in embodiments having different placements and different numbers of said diametrically reduced portions.

However, it is important in the making of shafts embodying my invention that the diamet- Y rically reduced portions shall be of relatively short lengths, ranging preferably from Y." to 1" in'preferred embodiments.

An object of my invention, therefore, is to provide an improved golf clubshaft'having improved distributon of flexibility in the different longitudinally disposed portions of its length.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved golf club shaft achieving the aforesaid obiect and which may be durable in use.

Another object of my invention is to provide 40 an improved golf club shaft susceptible of achieving the aforesaid objects without otherwise changing the shaft diametersin other than very restricted portions of v the length of ..theshaft, so that the results of the reduction of diameter in the very short diametrically reduced portions will be superimposed on the usual results achieved in the usual shafts which are progressively tapered throughout the major portion of their length.

Other objects of my invention and the invention itself will become more apparent to those skilled in this art by reference to the following drawing illustrating certain embodiments of my invention, and which are described in the 101- the general type of Referring to the drawing: Fig. 1 illustrates a complete golf club in elevation, which embodies the principles of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a similar view of the golf club of Fig.

- 1 in, though somewhat exaggerated for purpos s of illustration, a resiliently bent form occasioned during use of the club in play;

Fig. 3 is a similar-view of a fragment of the length of a golf club shaft like that of the fore- -going figures, but of "such enlarsed size. as to more proportionally illustrate its formation;

Fig. 4 is a similar view of a shaft per se, similar to the shafts of the foregoing flt es, but involving the step-taper formation of the main portions of the shaft instead of a smooth continuous taper, and which embodies my invention; Fig.5isaviewsimilartothatofFig.3,ofa similar shaft fragment of a shaft, which is another embodiment of my invention; and

Fig. 6 is a relatively larger view of a fragment of shaft, partially in elevation and partially in section, illustrating more clearly than in the preceding views a preferred formation of a diametrically reduced tubular neck portion of a shaft embodying my invention.

Referring now first to the embodiment of my invention illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, and 3, I illustrate therein a golf club having a headi' 'l and hand grip 2 aflixed in any known manner to the lower andupper ends of the shaft, the head I preferably having a tubular hosel 3 into which the lower end l-of the shaft is projected and into which it is tightly secured. The hand grip 2 comprises wrappings of a leather strip or otherwise comprises a layer of fabric, leather, rubber, or like material, placed 4 exteriorly on the upper end I of the shaft. The

'shaft comprises the portions 4 and I, and portions intermediate suchportions, and is. as indicated at 6, Fig. 3, of tubular, construction, made of chrome molybdenum steel or other metallic material; the walls of such shaft are .-.relatively thin, ordinarily varying in thickness according tothe reduction ofdiameter of the 1 ghait which ordinarily is tapered from the han end towards the tip end, and preferably the more 5 diametrically reduced, portions of the shaft, ordinarily being .at the tip end, have wallthicknesses in excess of that at the diametrically larger portions at the hand grip end of the shaft.

The shaft of this embodiment of my invention 5 may be, as illustrated, tapered at a uniform rate per. unit portion of its length, or the rate of taper may be varied as for instance as disclosed in the patent toI-Iackett, No. 1,974,271, dated Septernher-l8, 1934, which illustrates a conoidally tap- 60 ered shaft. The portions of the shaft above the point indicated at I may be otherwise than of conoidally tapered formation, and -very eflicient results are secured if the conoidally tapered form is employed only from the point I. to the-tip portion 3 Between the points indicated at 1 and s, 1 have provided what 1 herein term ahigh-whip" none of flexibility, which comprises relatively longitudinally short diametrically reduced portions la and la, each preferably having walls of circular cross sectional form and longitudinally of progressively increasing diameters in both longitudinal directions proceeding from the middle of each of said portions hand to. Y Fig. 3 illustrates the preferred formation of these diametrically reduced portions which may be conveniently termed "neck" portions. The junctions of the said "neck portions with the adjacent portions of the shaft are preferably smoothly curvilinearly formed so as to avoid any 5 abrupt break in the continuity of the curved surface extending longitudinally of the shaft, whereby bending stresses imposed upon the shaft, being accentuated in these neck portions, will not be so severely localized as to crystallize the metal at 10 said Junctions or elsewhere, but whereby when the shaft is subjected to such bending stresses as illustrated in somewhat exaggerated form in Fig. 2, these "neck" portions will yield to shorten their longitudinal extent at the concave side of the bent shaftand to lengthen their longitudinal extent at the convex side of the bent shaft. In effect, these "neck" portions provide miniature bellows effects in the operation of the shaft, such effect being limited by the degree of shallowness of such neck portions and the thickness of the material of the walls of the shaft comprised in said "'neck" portions. The provision of a plurality of these relatively short neck portions in the zone of flexibility" achieves substantially the same result as is achieved in the shafts of the said Vickery applications where there is provided a considerable length of intermediate portion of the shaft which .is of reduced diameter. except that in' the shaft so of the present invention the bending is more severely localized and the two "neck" portions are sufficiently close together that the combined effect of the two ."neck" portions spaced somewhat apart, as shown, is to accomplish the same amount of high-whip" which would preferably 1 be provided in shafts of the Vickery me.

, In Fig. 4'! show, as a matter of further rennement, another embodiment of my invention, 1,

wherein a fragment of the length of the shaft comprising the said "zone of flexibility between the points I' and I is shown, and having the "neck" portions lb and lb located respectively adjacent the said points I and l, and both be-- tween said points, and in additionI provide a relatively longer shaft portion of somewhat less reduced diameter shown at I extending between the shoulders II and ll,whereby the portion 0 is adapted to flex more readily and to a grea er degree for a given bending stress'than isth'e: similarly placed portion is of the shaft of Figs. ltosinclu'sivep I flnd that this construction is a further "on.

ment, effecting greater continuity in curvature as,a result of flexing stress in the saidsone-of I flexibility, and I further flnd that by diametrically reducing the shaft both in the portion I and the portions lb and lb in the same shaft, that none of these portions are required to be decreased in diameter to the same extent as would otherwise be the case. I find, also,; -that vibrations of the shaft which would strainthe' hands of the user in the ordinary ype of tubular steel golf club shafts. resulting from impact with the ball of the club head duringthe making of a stroke, are subdued as they are transmitted longitudinally of the'shaft,' by the break in the cally reduced neck portions lb and 8b in addition to the relatively longer reducedportion 0.

InFlg'. I show another embodiment'of my a e -s52 invention, which will be readily understood as its construction is or may be similar to the embodiments already described, it having the "neck portions 1c and to included in the said zone of flexibility between the points 1:): and 11 The portion 8', shown as being of the type shown in Figs. 1 to 3 inclusive at 9a, may also be of reduced diameter as shown at 9, Fig. 4, such construction being readily understood without the necessity of illustration in view of Fig. 4.

The shaft of Fig. 4 differs in its main portions comprising the grip supporting portion 5' and the portion between the club head supporting tip 4' and excluding the said zone of flexibility between !a: and 13/, in that instead of the said shaft being of smooth tapered form, the tapering is accomplished by providing a relatively large number of successive cylindrical sections each of successively reduced diameters according to the teachings of the prior patent to Robert H. Cowdery, No. 1,670,530, dated May 22, 1928. This construction has become known in the art as the step-taper construction, as distinguished from the smooth tapered construction of such shaft portions as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

In Fig. 6 I have illustrated a short fragment of the shaft to illustrate more particularly the result of the curvature of the outer wall of the shaft in and adjacent to one of the said neck" portions, to show the smooth curvilinear merging of the said neck portion of the shaft walls with the adjacent shaft wall portions, better than it could be done in the other necessarily reduced views, it being understood that a shaft may be from 33 to 44 inches long and the shaft diameters ordinarily varying from $4" to at the one end to from to at the other end.

In Fig. 6, I have shown a very short sectionof any of the shaft previously described and illustrated in the foregoing figures, said section comprising more particularly a view in elevation and section, to illustrate the formation of the tube at the said neck. In this view I have applied the reference characters C and C at the two sides of the shaft to indicate a proposed length of said neck and at D I have indicated the outside diameter of the shaft in the neck portion of least diameter, the neck being generally indicated by the reference character 81.

Although my invention in its broader aspects is not to be construed as being limited thereto, I find that most eflicient results are secured in embodiments of my invention wherein the length is not linearly in excess of the. circumference of the shaft as at the intermediate or portion of the neck'which is of least outside diameter. In other words, where the "neck C is made longer 60 thanwould be represented by a length equal to the linear distance around the circumference at the most restricted portion of the "neck," then there begins to be a localization of crystalizing stress in portions of the neck during use of the 5 shaft in a golf club, and one of the principal struction, and which is illustrated in the drawof the said neck," as indicated at C and C,

ing. is the preferable construction in view of,

the considerations hereinabove outlined.

By the definitely located necks occupying but a small portion of the length of the shaft, the club head is largely caused to swing more nearly about such a restriction without so much variation during portions of the swing which impose different degrees of flexing stresses on the shaft, and one of the objects of my invention is to achiieve a more accurate positioning of the portions of the shaft which are of maximum flexibility and which are located relatively nearer the hand grip portion than to the club head I head. At the same time, it is desirable that considerable flexibility be afforded in some portions of the shaft, in order to respond to the rebound efiect of the club head hitting a ball and which effect is very rapid. Such rebound effect may be had without the face of the club head leaving contact with the ball due to the velocity at which the club head travels when the ball is struck, and yet the rebound effect lust mentioned is experienced and involves flexing more particularly of the lower portion of the shaft at an extremely high velocity rate of flexure.

Having described my invention in different embodiments, I am aware that other embodiments of the invention may be made involving the use of a greater or lesser number of said "neck" portions and in combination with other structural changes, for instance that illustrated in Fig. 5. The neck" portionsmay be varied in degree of diametrical reduction and longitudinal length, and to some extent in placement longitudinally of the shaft, and within the pervue of my invention the scope of which is to be construed in view of the claims which follow the specification.

I claim:

1. A tubular metallic golf club shaft comprising oppositely disposed club head and hand grip supporting end portions, and an intermediate portion comprising a zone of increased flexibility,

said zone disposed longitudinally'of the shaft at least in part below the lower limit of said .hand grip supporting portion and substantially medially of the shaft, said zone characterized by the provision of at least one neck portion of the length ofthe tubular shaft which is of substan tially reduced diameter relative to the adjacent portions and of a length not substantially in excess of a linear dimension represented by the circumference of the portion of said "neck" which is of least outside diameter, and said neck comprising longitudinally concaved shaft side walls comprising substantially an arc of a circle and curvilinearly merging with the adjacent shaft wall portions whereby lateral flexing of the shaft is substantially intensified within the longitudinal extent of said neck, and the shaft diameters equidistant from the most restricted part of the neck portion and adjacent the neck portion being substantially qual.

2 A tubular metallic golf club shaft comprising oppositely disposed club head and hand grip sup porting end portions, and an intermediate portion comprising a zone of increased flexibility, said zone disposed longitudinally of the shaft at least in part below the lower limit of said hand grip supporting portion and substantially medially of the shaft, said zone characterized by the provision of at least a pair of neck portions each being of such a portion of the length of the tubular shaft which is not in excess of the circumferential distance around the shaft in the most diametrically reduced portion of said neck, and said neck comprising longitudinally concaved shaft side walls comprising substantially an arc of a circle and curvilinearly merging with the adjacent shaft wall portions whereby lateral flexing of the shaft is substantially intensiiied within the longitudinal extent of said neck, and the shaft diameters equidistant from the most restricted part of the neck portion and adjacent the neck portion being substantially equal.

3. The golf club shaft substantially as set forth in claim 1, characterized by said shaft being of substantially tapered form throughout most of its length with said "neck portion imposed between sections of said tapered shaft, and said neck comprising longitudinally concaved shaft side walls comprising substantially an arc of a circle and curvilinearly merging withthe adjacent shaft wall portions whereby lateral flexin of the shaft is substantially intensified within the longitudinal extent of said neck, and the shaft diameters equidistant from the most restricted part of the neck portion and adjacent the neck portion being substantially equal.

4. A tubular metallic golf club shaft comprising oppositely disposed club head and hand grip supporting end portions, and an intermediate portion comprising a zone of increased flexibility, said zone disposed longitudinally of the shaft at least in part below the lower limit of said hand grip supporting portion and substantially medi- 5 ally of the shaft, said zone characterized by the provision of at least one neck" portion of the length of the tubular shaft which is of substantially reduced diameter relative to the adjacent portions and of a length less than a linear di- 0 mension represented by thecircumference of the 5 merging with the adjacent shaft wall portions portion of said "nec which is of least outside diameter, and said neck comprising longitudinally concaved shaft side walls comprising substantially an arc of a circle and curvilinearly whereby lateral flexing of the shaft is substantially intensified within the longitudinal extent of said neck, and the shaft diameters equi-distant from the most restricted part of the neck portion and adjacent the neck portion being substantially e ual.

5. A tubular metallic golf club shaft comprising oppositely disposed club head and hand grip supporting end portions, and an intermediate portion comprising a zone of increased flexibility,

said zone disposed longitudinally of the shaft at least in part below the lower limit of said hand grip supporting portion and substantially medially of the shaft, said zone characterized by the provisionlof at least a pair of "neck" portions each being of such a portion of the length of the tubular shaft which is less than the circumferential distance around the shaft in the most greases diametrically reduced portion of said neck, and said necks comprising longitudinally concaved shaft side walls comprising substantially an arc of a circle and curvilinearly merging with the adjacent shaft wal portions whereby lateral flexing of the shaft is substantially intensified within the longitudinal extent of said necks, and the shaft diameter equi-distant from the most restricted part of the neck portion and adjacent the neck portion being substantially equal.

6. The golf club shaft substantially as set forth in claim 5, characterized by said shaft being of substantially tapered form throughout most of its length with said neck" portions imposed between sections of said tapered shaft, and said necks comprising longitudinally concaved shaft side walls comprising substantially an arc of a circle and curvilinearly merging with the adjacent shaft wall portions whereby lateral flexing of the shaft is substantially intensified within the longitudinal extent of said necks, and the curve.- ture from the most restricted part of said neck portion in each longitudinal direction to the juncture with adjacent shaft portions being substantially uniform.

7. The golf club shaft substantially as set forth in claim 2, characterized by said shaft being of substantially tapered form throughout most of its length, and said neck" portions inposed between sections of said tapered shaft.

8. The golf club shaft substantially as set forth in claim 4, characterized by said shaft being of substantially tapered form throughout most of its length, and said "neck" portion imposed between sections of said tapered shaft.

9. A golf club shaft of tubular metallic construction throughout, having in its portion intermediate the head and hand grip supportin end. portions at least one "neck" portion formed by deflecting an annular transversely extending portion of the wall of said shaft, radially inwardly, said inwardly deflected portion comprising an annular groove of the outer surface of the shaft, the said groove being of a width measuring less than the circumferential dimension of the shaft portions bordering said grooved portion, and said grooved portion being of curvilinear form in directions longitudinally of the shaft, and with its border portions merging with the adjacent portions of the shaft curvilinearly whereby said border portions are convexly curved relative to the concavely curved portion of the intermediate portion of the groove.

10. A-golf club shaft of tubular metallic construction throughout, having in its portion intermediate the head and hand grip supporting end portions at least one neck portion formed by deflecting an annular transversely extending portion of the wall of said shaft, radially inwardly, said inwardly deflected portion comprising an annular groove of the outer surface of the shaft, the said groove being of a width measuring less than the circumferential dimension of the shaft portions bordering said grooved portion, and said grooved portion having groove sides of curvilinear form in directions longitudinally of the shaft, and with its border portions merging with the adjacent portions of the shaft substantially curvilinearly whereby said border portions are convexly curved relative to the concavely curved portions disposed inwardly thereof at the sides of the groove.

ARCHIE W. SCO'I'I'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2546140 *May 4, 1945Mar 20, 1951Spalding A G & Bros IncRacket
US3764137 *Jun 9, 1972Oct 9, 1973A PetroCombination stiff and flexible golf club shaft
US5022652 *Sep 24, 1990Jun 11, 1991Spalding & Evenflo CompaniesLightweight steel golf shaft
US5265872 *Dec 23, 1992Nov 30, 1993Unifiber UsaGolf club shaft having definable "feel"
US5685781 *Feb 20, 1996Nov 11, 1997Swix Sport A/SGolf club shaft
US5692970 *Mar 14, 1995Dec 2, 1997Radius EngineeringComposite golf club shaft
US5904628 *Jun 12, 1997May 18, 1999Hillerich & Bradsby Co.Golf club
US5935017 *Jun 28, 1996Aug 10, 1999Cobra Golf IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US5961396 *Jun 1, 1998Oct 5, 1999Taylor Made Golf Company, Inc.Golf club shaft
US5964670 *Jan 22, 1997Oct 12, 1999Harrison Sports, Inc.Golf club shaft having improved feel
US5976032 *Nov 10, 1997Nov 2, 1999You; Chin-SanGolf club reinforced by ridges
US5993328 *Jul 1, 1997Nov 30, 1999True Temper Sports, Inc.Golf club shaft
US6024651 *Jan 12, 1998Feb 15, 2000Harrison Sports, Inc.Golf club shaft having contoured grip section and kick section
US6117021 *Dec 24, 1997Sep 12, 2000Cobra Golf, IncorporatedGolf club shaft
US6143236 *Apr 9, 1996Nov 7, 2000Radius Engineering, Inc.Method for manufacturing composite shafts with injection molded, rigidized bladder with varying wall thickness
US6824636Jul 19, 2002Nov 30, 2004Radius Engineering, Inc.Method of manufacturing a composite golf club head
US9566486 *Apr 9, 2015Feb 14, 2017True Temper Sports, Inc.Golf shaft and method of manufacturing same
US20150290505 *Apr 9, 2015Oct 15, 2015True Temper Sports, Inc.Golf shaft and method of manufacturing same
USD418566Jul 8, 1997Jan 4, 2000Cobra Golf IncorporatedLower section of a shaft adapted for use in a golf club shaft
WO1998023338A1 *Nov 26, 1997Jun 4, 1998Wavex CorporationGolf club shaft having wave shaped reinforced part
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/323
International ClassificationA63B53/12, A63B53/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2059/0081, A63B53/12, A63B59/0014
European ClassificationA63B53/12