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Publication numberUS2221527 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 12, 1940
Filing dateDec 4, 1939
Priority dateDec 4, 1939
Publication numberUS 2221527 A, US 2221527A, US-A-2221527, US2221527 A, US2221527A
InventorsSchick Matt D
Original AssigneeFabart Instr Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle
US 2221527 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. l2, 1940. M, D. SCHlCK 2,221,527

RECEPTACLE Filed Dec. 4, 1959 Patented Nov. 12, 1940 PATENT OFFICE RECEPTAOLE Matt. D. Schick, Chicago, Ill., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Fabart Instrument Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application December 4, 1939, Serial No. 307,353

6 Claims.

The invention relates to improvements in receptacles for liquids, granular and pulverulent products and has for its particular objects to provide a receptacle, such as a bottle, with a closure cap capable of limited movementl relatively to the receptacle from its sealing position to a positionwherein the receptacle contents may be discharged through an opening or openings in the peripheral wall of the cap which become positioned for such discharge when the cap is disposed at the upper limit of its movement, the structure' including a single gasket of suitable material disposed about the portion of the receptacle embraced by the cap and which maintains a seal between the latter and said lastnamed portion of the receptacle, when the cap is in discharge position for preventing leakage of contents of the receptacle between the skirt of the cap and said last-named receptacle when the cap is in its discharge position.

A further object of the invention is to provide `a structure of the above-mentioned type wherein the upper end portion of the gasket, functioning as aforesaid, also cooperates with the crown of 25 the cap to seal the receptacle when the cap is disposed at the lower limit of its movement.

. Another object of the invention is to provide a structure of the type comprehended by the foregoing paragraphs wherein the upper end portion 3o of the gasket cooperates with the mouth of the receptacle to constitute a funnel for the back flow of product into the receptacle as the latter is restored to upright position from discharge position.

Exemplary embodiments of the invention yare illustrated in the accompanying drawing,

wherein:

Fig. l is a fragmentary view in side elevation, partly in section, of a receptacle embodying and 4() constructed in accordance with the invention.

Fig. 2 is a central longitudinal section of the same taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing another exemplary embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 4 is a View similar to Fig. 1 showing the structure of Fig. 4 in side elevation.

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 3 with .certain parts of the latter omitted.

Fig. 6 is a View similar to Figs. 2, 3 and 5 showing another exemplary embodiment of the invention.

Fig. 7 is a detail fragmentary radial sectional view on an enlarged scale showing an exemplary type of gasket used in the structures illustrated in Figs. l to 6 inclusive.

lli

The structure of Figs. 1 and 2 is exemplary of a receptacle for liquids, such as liquors, medicines, lotions and the like, the neck portion I of which is equipped with external conventional thread formations 2 and an annular bead 3 below the threads 2. The portion 4 of the neck I immediately adjacent to the mouth 5 is of smaller diameter than the threaded portion and is equipped with an annular groove li between its ends to receive the internal annular bead 'I of the gasket 8 `which embraces all of the neck portion 4 and projects to an appreciable height above fthe latter, the uppermost end portion of said gasket 8 being provided with an internal beveled edge 9 which acts as a funnel element to cause back flow of liquid into the bottle as the latter is restored to upright position following discharge of liquid from the bottle.

The closure cap IU is equipped with a lcrown -II which is devoid of openings and the skirt portion of which is equipped with suitable thread formations I2 for engagement with the threads of the bottle. The length of said skirt portion ofthe-cap is appreciably greater than the distance between the upper edge of the gasket 8 and the low edge of the annular bead 3, the lower extremity of the cap being equipped with an nwardlyprojecting annular flange I3 for cooperation with the bead 3 to limit the upward movement of the cap.

` Adjacent the crown of the cap, the skirt portion is equipped with a pair of diametrically opposed openings I4 of sufficiently small diameter to preg vent flow of liquid from one'of said openings wn'en the other thereof is closed, as by pressing a finger tip over the latter, the diameter of said openings to produce this effect being determinable, of course, by the degree of viscosity of the liquid to be contained in the receptacle- `The gasket 8 is normally of larger diameter (see Fig. '7) than the inner diameter of the cap in order that it may maintain an effective seal against `flow of liquid through the skirt portion of the cap.

' Thus the gasket 8 performs three distinct functions, viz; that last-mentioned, cooperation with the crown of the cap to seal the receptacle, and that of providing a funnel formation for the back-dow of liquid into the receptacle as previously described. It also functions, necessarily, to seal the openings I 4 when the cap is disposed at the lower limit of its movement and because of this, it is unnecessary to force `the cap down upon theV gasket to an appreciable degree to effecta hermetic seal. It is obvious also that when the cap is forced down upon the gasket to the degree which will exert an appreciable compression stress upon the latter, then by the resultng distortion of the gasket the latter will be further bulged outwardly about the neck portion 4 and will seal the openings I4 more effectively than otherwise and exert such frictional resistance to rotation of the cap as will prevent unsealing of the receptacle in transit and handling.

In place of the conventional thread formations of the cap and receptacle, the latter may be equipped with a relatively wide cylindrical bead I5, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, which is received telescopically in the skirt portion I6 of the cap I'I. Said bead I5 may be provided with diametrically opposed grooves I8 having oppositely extending but parallel end portions I9 lying in planes perpendicular to the axis of the bead, and an inclined middle portion. The skirt I6 of the cap I'I is equipped with a pair of diametrically opposed inwardly extending projections 2 which engage in the respective grooves I8-I9, the length of the latter being such as to limit the rotation of the cap to a quarter of a revolution to raise and lower the same from and to sealing position, said groove functioning similarly to a bayonet joint groove. As also shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the cap I'I may be equipped With small perforations 2l for the discharge of granular or pulverulent products such as salt, face powder and the like, said structure being particularly adapted to contain products of the lastmentioned types which are hygroscopic.

Obviously, the cap of Figs. l and 2 may be provided with the perforations of the cap of Figs. 3 and 4 and vice versa; the openings I4 of the cap of Figs. l and 2 may be substituted for the perforations of the cap of Figs. 3 and 4.

As shown in Fig. 5, the annular bead 22 of the receptacle neck, which is relatively Wide, is devoid ofgrooves and the cylindrical skirt portion 23 of the cap 2d equipped with perforations 25 similar to those shown in Figs. 3 and 4, is provided with the inturned flange 26 for cooperation with the bead 22 to limit upward movement of the cap, the latter being pulled up and pushed down by the user of the receptacle which is adapted particularly to contain table-salt. The receptacle may be of a well known type having a bottomI refill opening sealed with a cork, or the like. The gasket 2l of said receptacle, which corresponds in construction above the bead 2l thereof with the portion of the structure above the threads of Figs. l and 2, acts both to seal the perforations 24 and to yieldingly resist movement of the cap from and to sealing position.

The gaskets shown in the several gures may be of composition best adapted for the receptacle contents with respect to chemical reaction thereon or affecting taste or odor of same.

Disks t may be disposed in the crowns of the caps as shown in Figs. 3 and 4 for heat insulation or other purposes, as desired.

In the structure of Fig. 6 the' gasket 29 is dis posed upon the receptacle neck 30 and the annular beard 3| of the cap 32 is forced over the same to sealing position, the said bead 3II being spaced from the lower edge of the gasket a distance substantially equal to the depth of the openings 33 in the peripheral wall of the cap adjacent its crown. In raising the cap to discharge position, the bead 3l cooperates with the lower edge of the gasket to limit the upward movement of the cap under ordinary conditions of use, the cap being removable for rellng the receptacle by exercise of sucient force to cause the said bead 3| to pass the said gasket. In the structure of Fig. 6 the gasket performs all of the functions hereinbefore enumerated plus that of acting as a stop formation.

In Fig. 7, the normal and preferred cross sectional shape of the gaskets shown in the several figures of the drawing is illustrated, the outer peripheral portion of said gasket being bulged so that the body thereof is of greatest thickness in alignment with the flange 34 thereof. Thus compression of the gasket due to radial pressure of the cap exerted thereon, causes the greatest pressure to be exerted on said flange S4 and displacement of material causes the upper edge of the gasket to become flared and its lower edge portion to bulge slightly below the bottom of the annular groove in the receptacle neck in instances wherein an open annular space exists between the skirt of the cap and the opposed portions of the receptacle neck as is necessitated by the bead 3I of the cap in Fig. 6.

The structures of Figs. 5 and 6 adapt themselves to receptacle necks of a variety of shapes in horizontal section since it is not required that the caps thereof be rotated to move said caps to and from discharge position.

I claim as my invention:

1. A receptacle equipped with a neck portion of smaller diametric dimensions adjacent the mouth thereof Ithan along its base portion, said smaller dimension neck portion equipped at its base with a peripheral shoulder and shaped to retain a gasket against longitudinal movement, a resilient gasket supported upon said shoulder and engaged with and embracing said last-named neck portion and projecting beyond the upper end thereof, said gasket being normally of greater outer diametric dimensions than the larger portion of said neck below said shoulder, a crowned cap of less inner diametric dimensions than the lastnamed dimensions of said gasket and disposed over the latter and in embracing relation` to the portion of the neck below said shoulder and movable longitudinally of said neck portion, there being openings in the peripheral wall of said cap adjacent the crown thereof fori dischargel of receptacle contents as said cap' is raised to space the crown thereof from its cooperating sealing position relatively to said gasket to unseal the receptacle, said gasket disposed to seal said openings when said cap is disposed in receptacle sealing position.

2. A receptacle equipped with a neck portion of smaller diametric dimensions adjacent the mouth portion thereof than along its base portion, said smaller dimension neck portion equipped at its :base with a peripheral shoulder and shaped to retain a gasket against longitudinal movement, a resilient gasket supported upon said shoulder and engaged with and embracing said last-narned neck portion and projecting beyond the upper end thereof, said gasket being normally of greater outer diametric dimensions than the last-named dimensions of said gasket and disposed over the latter and in embracing relation to the portion of the neck below said shoulder and movable longitudinally of said neck portion, there being openings in the peripheral wall of said cap adjacent the crown thereof for discharge of receptacle contents as said cap is raised to space the crown thereof from its cooperative sealing position relatively to said gasket to unseal the receptacle, said gasket disposed to seal said openings when said cap is disposed in receptacle sealing position, and means for limiting the upward movement of said cap.

3. A receptacle equipped with a neck portion of smaller diametric dimensions adjacent the mouth thereof than along its base portion, said smaller dimension neck portion equipped at its base with a peripheral shoulder and shaped to retain a gasket against longitudinal movement, a resilient gasket supported upon said shoulder and engaged with and embracing said last-named neck portion and projecting beyond the upper end thereof, said gasket being normally of greater outer diametric dimensions than the larger portion of said neck below said shoulder, a crowned cap of less inner diametric dimensions than the last-named dimensions of said gasket and disposed over the latter and in embracing relation to the portion of the neck below said shoulder and movable longitudinally of said neck portion, there being openings in the peripheral wall of said cap adjacent the crown thereof for discharge of receptacle contents as said cap is raised to space the crown thereof from its cooperating sealing position relatively to said gasket to unseal the receptacle, said gasket disposed to seal the said openings when said cap is disposed in receptacle sealing position, the uppermost end of said gasket constituting a funnel element for effecting back flow of receptacle cont-ents into the receptacle following discharge of part thereof.

4. A receptacle equipped with a neck portion of smaller diametric dimensions adjacent the mouth thereof than along its base portion, said smaller' dimension neck portion equipped at its base with a peripheral shoulder and shaped to retain a gasket against longitudinal movement, a

resilient gasket supported upon said shoulder and engaged with and embracing said last-named neck portion and projecting beyond the upper end thereof, said gasket being normally of greater outer diametric dimensions than the larger portion of said neck below said shoulder, a crowned cap of less inner diametric dimensions than the last-named dimensions of said gasket and disposed over the latter and in embracing relation to the portion of the neck below said shoulder and movable longitudinally of said neck portion, there being openings in the peripheral wall of said cap adjacent the crown thereof for discharge of receptacle contents as said cap is raised to space the crown thereof from its cooperating sealing position relatively to said gasvkeit to unseal the receptacle, said gasket disposed to seal said openings when said cap is disposed in receptacle sealing position, said cap equipped between its ends with an inwardly projecting annular bead adapted to be forced over said gasket and to be disposed spaced from the lower end of the latter when the cap is disposed in sealing position and cooperating with said gasket to yieldingly limit the upward movement of said cap. j

5. A receptacle equipped with a neck portion, a crowned cap engaged with said neck portion for limited movement longitudinally thereof from sealing to unsealing position and having discharge openings in its peripheral wall adjacent said crown, a resilient sealing gasket of normally appreciably greater diametric dimensions than said cap embracing said neck portion along the mouth portion of the latter and engaged against longitudinal movement thereon, the upper edge portion of said gasket projecting above the receptacle mouth for cooperation with the cap crown to seal the receptacle and the peripheral portion of said gasket adapted to seal the said openings when said cap is disposed in sealing position and serving also to resist frctionally the movement of said cap and to hold the latter relatively firmly in any position to which it is moved.

6. A receptacle equipped with a neck portion, a gasket of resilient material engaged with said neck portion against longitudinal movement and projecting in part beyond the mouth thereof, a crowned cap for said receptacle equipped with a skirt portion of smaller inner diametric dimensions than said gasket and adapted to receive the latter telescopically and maintain the same compressed and deformed to cause its upper edge portion to project to a greater than normal degree beyond the receptacle mouth and thereby render said projecting portion substantially funnel shaped and cause the body of said gasket to rresist frictionally the movement of said cap, the

skirt portion of the latter equipped with openings adjacent its crown for discharge of receptacle contents as said cap is raised from the position wherein said crown thereof bears upon said gasket and the latter seals said openings to a position wherein said openings communicate with the receptacle mouth, said skirt portion and receptacle neck equipped with cooperating means for limiting the upward movement of said cap.

MATT. D. SCHICK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2582566 *Mar 8, 1950Jan 15, 1952Leonard MaullinDispensing bottle closure
US2639057 *Mar 15, 1949May 19, 1953Erich GronemeyerContainer closure
US2659507 *Jul 13, 1951Nov 17, 1953Jonker FrederickBeverage container
US2848145 *Mar 17, 1955Aug 19, 1958Jay G LivingstonePouring adapter
US2854163 *Apr 9, 1954Sep 30, 1958Owens Illinois Glass CoPour-out fitments
US4349056 *Dec 22, 1980Sep 14, 1982The Procter & Gamble CompanyContainer for liquid with non-drip measuring cap closure
US6371319 *Sep 22, 1997Apr 16, 2002Abbott LaboratoriesClosure system for containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/309, 215/352, 215/45
International ClassificationB65D47/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/061
European ClassificationB65D47/06A