Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2222233 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1940
Filing dateMar 24, 1939
Priority dateMar 24, 1939
Publication numberUS 2222233 A, US 2222233A, US-A-2222233, US2222233 A, US2222233A
InventorsLoyd Mize
Original AssigneeLoyd Mize
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cement retainer
US 2222233 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. W, 1940. L. MIIZE CEMENT RETAINER Filed March 24, 1939 5 Sheets-Sheet l Man, A iiorneys W 9, 140. 1., MIZE 222,2 33

CEMENT RETAINER Filed March 2 1, 1939 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Inventor A iiorneys Patented Nov. 19, 1940 UNITED STATES CEMENT mrrmn Loyd Mize, Palestine, Tex.

Application March 24,

8 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in cement retainers, and an important object of my invention is to provide a cement retainer which may be run in deep wells without any danger of setting taking place before the desired depth ha been reached.

Another important object of my invention is to provide in an arrangement of the character indicated, means whereby positive mechanical control of the operations of the retainer at all times is available while the retainer is being run into the hole.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a cement retainer of the character indicated which can be constructed with a complete metallic exterior which will be easy to drill Other important objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from a reading of the following description taken in connection with the drawings, wherein for purposes of illustration I have set forth a preferred embodiment of my invention.

in the drawings: 1

Figure 1 is a longitudinally contracted side elevational view of a retainer assembly in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is an enlarged transverse vertical sectional view taken through the supplementary tool showing the piston in an elevated position.

Figure 3 is an enlarged transverse vertical sectional view taken through the retainer per se.

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken through Figure 3 approximately on the line 4-4 and looking downwardly in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is a horizontal sectional view taken through Figure 3 approximately on the line 5-5 and looking downwardly in the direction of the arrow. 1

Figure 6 is a side elevational view of the double tapered cylinder.

Figure 'l is a top plan view of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a side elevational view of a removable connector.

Figure 9 is a bottom plan view of Figure 8.

Figure 10 is a fragmentary transverse vertical, sectional view taken through the upper part of Figure 3.

Figure 11 is a top plan view of one of the slips.

Referring in detail to the drawings, the numera1 b generally designates the device of the invention as a whole which comprises a cement retainer and a'supplementary tool 6. 55 As shown in Figure 2 of the drawings the sup- 1939, Serial No. 263,995

plementary tool 6 comprises the cylindrical barrel I which is reduced at its upper end as indicated by the numeral 8 and interiorly threaded as indicated by the numeral 9 for connection to the well tubing. Radial fingers I0 project interiorly at the upper end of the uniform diameter portion thereof to act as stops for the piston H p which is reciprocable therein. The piston ll comprises a disk-shaped core H provided adjacent its periphery with upwardly tapered orifices 12, the core llf being constructed of compressible material such as rubber and provided in its center with an opening I3 which is connected to the upper end of the reciprocable tube 14. The tube 1 4 slides non-rotatably through an opening I5 in the annulus Hi, the annulus being threaded into the lower end of the barrel 1 as indicated by the numeral H. The annulus I6 has downwardly tapered orifices l8 circumferentially spaced therearound and having their small ends opening through the bottom of the annulus with their upper and wider ends opening into a depression It in the top of the annulus. A depending lateral flange on the lower end of the annulus 16 engages the bottom of the barrel '1. A compressible material washer 2| lies on the top of the annulus H5 in a position to close the lower ends of the orifices l2 of the piston when the barrel 1 is raised so that the annulus It meets the piston H. The depending tapered portion 22 of the piston conformably fits in the depression ill in the top of .the annulus it when the annulus and the piston engage, so that the orifices l2 and the orifices [8 are eiiectively closed. Ball valves 23 are arranged to seat in the larger ends of the orifices l8 to prevent downward flow of fluid through these orifices while permitting upward flow of fluid through these orifices when the piston II and annulus 46 are separated. The lower end of the tube i4 is exteriorly threaded as indicated by the numeral 24- to thread into the interiorly threaded part of the connector 25. The connector 25 is in the form of a heavy disk having an axial depending tubular part 26 which is provided on its outer side with right hand square threads 21 which engage similar threads 28 within the top of the-barrel 29. The interior of the barrel 29 is provided immediately below the square threads 28 with a seat 30 against which the lower end of the tubular part 26 of the connector engages. The threads 3| are left hand threads in opposition to the right hand square threads 21. The means (not shown), such as a spline, provided on the tube 14 to prevent the tube I4 from turning relative to the barrel 1 of the supplementary tool, and the square threads 3| and 21 are arranged as described in order that rotation of the supplementary tool 6 in a reverse direction will disconnect the connector 25 from the top of the barrel 29.

Depending from the bottom of the connector 25 are L-shaped slip hangers 32 which are in circumferentially spaced arrangement so that in the screwing out of the connector 25 in the releasing direction the hooks of the slip hangers will withdraw from engagement under the shoulders 33 in the elongated openings 34 in the tops of the slips 35 the slips being positioned below the connector 25 and circumferentially arranged around the upper part 36 of the cylinder 31. The slips as indicated in Figure 3 are tapered at their inner faces to slide on the upper tapered portion 36 of the double tapered cylinder 31. The cylinder 31 is slidably mounted on the exterior of the barrel 29, the upper part of the bore of the upper tapered part 36 having slip-teeth 38 engaging the exterior of the adjacent portion of the barrel 29. As indicated in Figures 6 and 7 of the drawings, the upper part 36 of the double tapered member 31 is formed with several circumferentially spaced vertical slits 39 and between them with radially projecting lugs 40, the latter engaging in conforming openings 4| in the tops of the slips 35, whereby the slips are prevented from turning on the tapered barrel 31. The barrel 31 is prevented from turning relative to the inner barrel 29 when the slotted upper part of the barrel 31 is constricted on the upper part of the barrel 29 by downward movement of the slips 35 on the taper barrel 29.

of the said upper part of the barrel 31. Longitudinal springs 42 projecting upwardly'from the untaperedportion of the tapered barrel 31 and extending along and in engagement with the slips 35 impart sufficient frictional engagement of the slips with the upper tapered portion 36 of the tapered barrel 31 to hold the slips from shifting except under positive action of the device in the course of its operation.

Fitted on the outside of the lower tapered portion 43 of the double tapered barrel 31 and along the exterior of the inner barrel 29 below the barrel 31 is the rubber or other suitable compressible material cylinder 44 which has its lower end seated on the shoulder 45 of the enlarged diameter portion 46 on the lower end of the inner Circumferential lugs 41 rising from the shoulder 45 anchor the sleeve or cylinder 44 in place, the sleeve 44 having a proper diameter to engage the side walls of the casing or well.

A lower seat 48 is formed at the lower end of the inner barrel 29 and this opens into a laterally expanded chamber 49 with an'open lower end in which is mounted a removable apertured bushing 59 which has projections 5| preventing seating of the sealing ball 52 which is free in the chamber 49 except for initial positioning by a small rod 53 which passes through an opening 54 in one side of the upper part of the enlarged portion 46 of the barrel 29 and lies along the exterior of the inner barrel 29, and has its lower end connected to the ball 52. The ball is of lighter specific gravity than the fluids to be handled, and has for its purpose to maintain equal hydrostatic pressure in the tool or line and in the retainer while the retainer is being worked down into the well. The removable bushing is provided only for the purpose of affording access to the chamber 49 for removal and replacement of the ball 52.

The purpose of the present device is to act as a; tool which can be run on the tubing to any desired depth in a deep well and thereupon be set so as to form a perfect seal in the well, so that a greater pressure can be produced and maintained inside of the well tube and below the retainer than could be held by the well casing, thereby preventing the high pressure from bursting the well casing above the retainer. The utility of this arrangement is evident when it is considered that in the process of cementing off salt water, sand, and other deleterious material in a well, it is frequently necessary to employ relatively greater pressures to force the cement into place than the casing would hold. With the present device set at the bottom of the casing all of this pressure is kept inside of the tubing and in the well below the device.

Operation The present cement retainer and setting tool are assembled as shown in Figure 1 of the drawings, the slips 35 being hung on the slip hangers 32. The threaded nipple 9 is screwed on the lower end of the tubing and all run down into the well to the desired depth, whereat the tubing is rotated about one-half turn to the right. Since the lugs 40 prevent the slips from rotating relative to the barrel 31 the slip hanger 32 releases the slips when rotated, the released slips being free to slide down the tapered upper barrel portion 36 and wedge against the wall of the well casing (not shown). The tubing is then pulled upwardly relative to the part 31 which is held fixed in the well casing by the wedged slips 35, the part 29 sliding within the part 31 in this action. The upper end of the rod 53 being seated against the lower end of the part 31 is adapted upon relative movement of the parts 29 and 31 to be moved downwardly so as to release the ball valve 52. At the same time the part 46 moves upwardly and wedges the packing 44 between the part 31 and the well casing, thereby forming a perfect seal. The upward pull of the tubing also causes the slips to press on the bevel 36 on the part 31 so that the inside slip teeth 38 grip the part 29 and thereby prevent the retainer from expanding back into normal or original position, thereby maintaining the packing 44 in sealing condition. At this stage the tubing is held upwardlywith about a two-ton pull against the retainer and the cement is pumped down through the tubing, passes out of the retainer and out into the formation. After the desired amount of cement has been applied in this manner to the well hole, the pull on the tubing is slacked of! enough to permit expansion of the setting tool, and mud or water is pumped down through the casing and up through the holes l2 and I8, thereby forcing any excess cement back up through the tubing while the ball, being seated in the opening 48, holds back the cement in the formation. If the formation resistance would be calculated beforehand, this reversing of the action would be unnecessary, but under present conditions the reversing is necessary to get the excess cement out of the tubing.

The foregoing having been performed, the tubing is rotated to the right so as to unscrew the part 25 from the part 29, the part 25 and the setting tool 6 being then pulled out of the hole, leaving the retainer set in place to hold back the formation pressure.

Although I have shown and "described herein a preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be definitely understood that I do not desire t limit the application of my invention thereto.

and any change or changes may be made in the materials and in the structure and arrangement of the parts within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the subjoined claims. i Having described the invention, what is claimed as new is:

l. A cement retainer apparatus comprising a supplementary tool and a retainer, said supplementary tool comprising abarrel for connection with the well tubing and a valving piston including a tubular connection; said retainer comprising a releasable connector with which said tubular connection is connected, an inner barrel having a float valve at its lower end, releasable means connecting said connector and the upper end of said inner barrel and operable by movement of said tubular connection.

2. A cement retainer apparatus comprising a including a tubular connection; said retainer comprising a releasable connector with which said tubular connection is connected, an inner barrel having a float valve at its lower end, releasable means connecting said connector and the upper end of said inner barrel and operable by movement of said tubular connection, said retainer further comprising slips releasably connected to said connector, an outer barrel slidable on said inner barrel and having an upper tapered part on which the slips work.

3. A cement retainer apparatus comprising a supplementary tool and a retainer, said supplementary tool comprising a barrel for connection with the well tubing and a valving piston including a tubular connection; said retainer comprising a releasable connector with which said tubular connection is connected, an inner barrel hav- 49 ing a float valve at its lower end, releasable meansconnecting said connector and the upper end of said inner barrel and operable by movement of said tubular connection, said retainer further comprising slips releasably connected to 43 said connector, an outer barrel slidable on said inner barrel and having an upper tapered part on which the slips work, and a compressible ma terial sleeve on the exterior of said outer barrel and lying along and anchored to a part of said 5d inner barrel below said outer barrel.

it. A cement retainer apparatus comprising a supplementary tool and a retainer, said supplementary tool comprising a barrel for connection with the well tubing and a valving piston includ- 55 ing a tubular connection; said retainer comprising a releasable connector with which said tubular connection is connected, an inner barrel having a float valve at its lower end, releasable means connecting said connector and the upper end of said inner barrel and operable by movement of said tubular connection, said retainer further comprising slips releasably connected to said connector, an outer barrel slidable on said inner barrel and having an upper tapered part on which the slips work, and a compressible material sleeve on the exterior of said outer barrel and lying along and anchored to a part of said inner barrel below said outer barrel, said outer barrel having its lower part downwardly tapered and received in a downwardly tapered part of the bore of said compressible sleeve.

.5. A cement retainer apparatus comprising a supplementary tool and a retainer, said supplementary tool comprising a barrel for connection 7 with the well tubing and a valving piston includ- Fifi ing a tubular connection; said retainer comprising a releasable connector with which said tubular connection is connected, an inner barrel having a float valve at its lower'end, releasable means connecting said connector and the upper end of said inner barrel and operable by movement of said tubular connection, the barrel of said supplementary tool having a bushing in its lower end through which said tubular connection works, said bushing being formed with orifices opening through the top and bottom thereof, free balls disposed above'said bushings to close the upper ends of the orifices upon a downstroke of the piston, said piston being provided with orifices opening through the top and bottom thereof and with an annular part arranged to close the upper ends of the orifices in said bushing while the piston and the bushing are fully engaged, said bushing being provided with an annular part to close the lower ends of the orifices of the piston while the piston and the bushing are engaged.

6. A device of the character described, said device comprising an inner cylinder open at its upper end, a float valve for closing the lower end of said inner cylinder, an outer barrel on and slidable along said inner cylinder, said outer barrel having an upwardly tapered part, slips on said upwardly tapered part, said slips having tapered inner iaces vertically slidable on said upwardly tapered part, a member mounted on the upper end of said inner cylinder, elements on said member releasably holding the slips against movement downwardly along the upwardly tapered part of the outer barrel, a conduit releasably connectible to said member in communication with the said upper end of the inner cylinder, said conduit being operable to move said member to release the slips for downward movement along said upwardly tapered part of the outer barrel.

7. Cement retainer apparatus comprising a supplementary tool having a tubular member and a retainer, said retainer comprising an inner barrel and an outer barrel slidable along said inner cylinder, a tubular connector screwing into the upper end of said inner cylinder, said tubular connector screwing onto the lower end of said tubular member of the supplementary tool, a lateral iiange on said tubular connector overhanging the upper end of said outer barrel and having depending slip hangers, an upwardly tapeered part on the exterior of said outer barrel, slips having tapered inner faces engaging said upwardly tapered part, said slips having portions releasably retaining said slip hangers, said connector being rotatable by rotation of the tubular member of said supplementary tool to disengage said slip hangers from said portions of the slips and permit said slips to move downwardly along the upwardly tapered part of the outer barrel.

8. Cement retainer apparatus comprising a supplementary tool having a tubular member and a retainer, said retainer comprising an inner barrel and an outer barrel slidable along said inner cylinder,'a tubular connector screwing into the upper end of said inner cylinder, said tubular connector screwing onto the lower end of said tubular member of the supplementary tool, a lateral flange on said tubular connector overhanging the upper end of said outer barrel and having depending slip hangers, an upwardly tapered part on the exterior of said outer barrel, slips having tapered inner faces engaging said. upward:

nector being rotatable by rotation of the tubular member of said supplementary tool to disengage said slip hangers from said portions of the slips and permit said slips to move down- 'wardly along the upwardly tapered part of the outer barrel, said upwardly tapered part of the outer barrel being formed with vertical slots atfording contraction of said upwardly tapered part on said inner cylinder as the slips move downwardly along said upwardly tapered part in contact with the wall of a well casing.

LOYD MIZE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2549007 *Dec 22, 1945Apr 17, 1951Baker Oil Tools IncWell packer plugging apparatus
US2555627 *Dec 22, 1945Jun 5, 1951Baker Oil Tools IncBridge plug
US2598340 *Jul 20, 1946May 27, 1952Baker Oil Tools IncWell packer lock device
US2782860 *Oct 19, 1953Feb 26, 1957Exxon Research Engineering CoApparatus for well workover operations
US4531583 *Mar 9, 1983Jul 30, 1985Halliburton CompanyCement placement methods
US20130186648 *Jan 25, 2012Jul 25, 2013Baker Hughes IncorporatedTubular anchoring system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/124, 166/140, 166/150, 166/290, 166/131, 166/128
International ClassificationE21B33/134, E21B33/13
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/134
European ClassificationE21B33/134