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Publication numberUS2222531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1940
Filing dateApr 29, 1939
Priority dateApr 29, 1939
Publication numberUS 2222531 A, US 2222531A, US-A-2222531, US2222531 A, US2222531A
InventorsDwyer James J
Original AssigneeDwyer James J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foiling device for wax dentures
US 2222531 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov; 19, 1940. J. J. DWYER 2,222,531

FOILING DEVICE FOR WAX DENTURES Filed April 29, 1939 2 SheetS- -Sheet 1 Nov. 19, 1940. T M. DWYER I 2,222,531

' FOILINC: DEVICE FOR WAX DENTURES Filed April 29, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 W III r r '.\"I/L Patented Nov. 19, 1940 UNITED STATES FFICE 5 Claims.

This invention relates to the manufactureof dentures in which the artificial teeth are'mounted in a plate formed of a molded plastic, certain of which plastics must, in the process of manufacture, be prepared in molds which are lined with an impervious substance such as tin-foil which is chemically inert toward the plastic.

The usual practice is to apply the tin-foil to the mold by hand and to smooth it down and fit it into the surface irregularities. Apparatuses have been devised for mechanically foiling the Wax denture from which the mold is formed but all of these apparatuses with which I am familiar are of such nature that they either do not smooth- 1y affix the foil to the denture or into the irregularities thereof, due primarily, to the fact that they do not properly conform to the denture prior to the application of pressure through which the actual foiling operation is accomplished. Furthermore, wax dentures are fragile and the strain placed thereon unless'evenly applied has a tendency to deform the same. Additionally, these devices require the use of excessive pressure, cannot be employed in foiling dental casts or models without flasking the same and ordinarily employ a rigid mounting for the flask requiring separate fixtures for use with flasks of different sizes.

Important objects of the present invention are the production of a device which may be utilized in foiling such dentures, which is so constructed that pressure is applied uniformly about the denture, mold or cast, which is so constructed that it may be utilized with equal facility on shallow or deeply arched dentures, which may be employed in foiling with or without a flask and which will accommodate flasks of various sizes.

Another object of the invention is the production of a device of this character which may be cheaply manufactured and in which the foiling may be accomplished with the use of much less pressure than that heretofore considered necessary.

These and other objects I attain by the construction shown in the accompanying drawings wherein, for the purpose of illustration, I have shown a preferred embodiment of my invention and wherein:

Fig. 1 is a combined perspective partially in section illustrating a foiling device constructed in accordance with my invention;

Fig. 2. is a sectional view through the composite fluidly resilient member by which'pressure is directly applied to the denture and foil;

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the main body of the pressure-applying member;

Fig. 4 is a perspective of the removable filler piece employed with the composite pressure-applying member under certain circumstances;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view through the mold in the process of foiling a deeply arched or lower denture;

Fig. 6 is a similar view showing an apparatus in use for foiling a shallowly arched or upper denture;

Fig. 7 is a perspective of the filler ring employed about the dental flask;

Fig. 8 is a section similar to that of Fig. 5, showing the foiling process prior to the application of pressure;

Fig. 9 is a section on line 99 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 1D is a perspective view showing the insert employed when foiling dental casts or models without the use of a flask; and

Fig. 11 is a sectional view through the foiling device illustrating failing of a dental cast without the use of a flask.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, the numeral If] designates a dental flask containing either a wax impression D of an artificial denture, or a dental cast I conforming to one side of the proposed denture, and l I a metallic container for the flask having an internal diameter larger than the flask. About the flask I arrange a highly resilient ring l2 which conforms to the outer surface of the flask and to the inner surface of the container 1 I. Within the container I impose upon the flask a fluidly resilient pressure element comprising a main body l3 and a molded insert M adapted to fit within and conform to the shaping of a recess l5 formed in the under surface of the main body and conforming substantially to the shaping of an artificial denture having a relatively deeply arched formation such as a lower plate.

The main body has a depression Iii in its upper surface so formed that the cross section of the main body upon any diameter is, as nearly as possible, uniform and of substantial thickness with the filler member l4 removed. Insert I4 is, of course, formed of the same material as pressure element I3. A cap I! is provided through which pressure may be applied to the pressureapplying member l3, this cap having its inner surface formed to conform to the shaping of the upper surface of the pressure-applying member l3. It will be obvious that, due to the fact that the material of pressure element l3 and the insert I 4 is fluidly resilient and, due to the fact that by use or omission of the insert M the pressure element can be made to conform very nearly exactly to the contour of the member to be foiled,

that pressure will be uniformly applied about the surfaces of the denture or cast and the foil will, accordingly, be smoothly forced in position thereagainst. Furthermore, due to the use of the highly resilient ring I2 the flask l may shift within the container II to properly centralize itself to imposed pressures, thus avoiding application of the severe side strains resulting fromthe use of i the ring l2 this insert conforming in size and fixed structures.

In addition to foiling devices contained in flasks it is also possible to foil dental casts or models without placing the same in a flask, this being illustrated in the sectional view forming Figure 11. In performing this operation the insert l8 illustrated in Figure 10 is utilized within shape to the opening of the ring. As a matter of fact, in practice the ring l2 and insert l8 are I shipped as a solid disc from which the insertis cut in accordance with the size of flasks employed by the user. Upon the disc formed. by the combination of ring [2 and insert l8 the dental cast I 20 is seated and the pressure member [3 or this member in combination with the insert l4 employed depending upon the nature of the cast which is to be foiled. Since a resilient base is provided for the cast and this base has the same resiliency and characteristics as the pressureapplying member, it is obvious that inequalities in pressure which otherwise would result in breakage of the cast will be avoided.

It is to be understood that the term denture l as employed .in the appended claims comprises dental impressions and casts therefrom as Well as limiting myself to the arrangement herein specifically illustrated except as hereinafter claimed.

I claim: 1. In a foiling device for Waxed-up dentures and the like comprising a flask receiving the denture, a rigid receiver loosely surrounding the flask, a resilient filler peripherally encompassing the flask and loosely fitting Within the receiver, a cap interiorly constructed to substantially conform to the shape of the exposed face of the denture and of substantially uniform thickness in directions perpendicular to the denture and a i rigid member interiorly fitting the receiver and conforming to the shape of the cap through which pressure may be applied to the denture through the cap, said cap being formed of material having the inherent characteristics of soft rubber.

2. In a foiling device for waxed-up dentures and the like comprising a support for the denture, a rigid receiver for the support and denture, a cap interiorly constructed to substantially conform to the shape of the exposed face of the denture and of substantially uniform thickness in directions perpendicular to the denture and a rigid member interiorly fitting the receiver and conforming to the shapeof the cap through which pressure may be applied to the denture through the cap, said cap being formed of material having the inherent characteristics of soft rubber.

3. In a foiling device for waxed-up dentures and the like comprising a support for the denture, a'rigid receiver for the support and denture, a cap interiorly constructed to substantially conform to the shape of the exposed face of the denture and of substantially uniform thickness in directions perpendicular to the denture and a rigid member interiorly fitting the receiver and conforming to the shape of the cap through which pressure maybe applied to the denture through the cap, said capand support being formed of material having the inherent characteristics of soft rubber.

4. In a foiling device for waxed-up dentures and the like comprising a support for the denture, I

a rigid receiver forvthe support and denture, a cap having its inner face' grooved to substantially conform to the shape of the exposed face of the denture and of substantially uniform thickness in directions perpendicular to the denture, a rigid memberinteriorly fitting the receiver and conforming to the shape of the cap through which pressure may be applied to the denture through the cap, and a filler for said groove, said cap and filler being formed of material having the inherentcharacteri's'tics of soft rubber.

5. In a foiling device for. waxed-up dentures and the like'comprising a support forthedenture, a rigid receiver for thesupport and denture, a cap having its inner face grooved to substantially conform to the shape of the exposed face ofthe denture and of substantially uniform thickness in directions perpendicular to the denture, a rigid member interiorly fitting the receiver and conforming to the shape of the cap through which pressure may be applied to the denture through the cap, and a filler for said groove, said cap support and filler being formed of material having the inherent'characteristics of soft rubber.

. JAMES J. DWYER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6848898 *Aug 29, 2001Feb 1, 2005Itzhak ShoherAdaptation device for molding a dental material
US7578667 *Sep 6, 2007Aug 25, 2009Ivoclar Vivadent AgDental mold flask
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/175
International ClassificationA61C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61C13/00
European ClassificationA61C13/00