Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2223119 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 26, 1940
Filing dateMar 13, 1939
Priority dateOct 20, 1938
Publication numberUS 2223119 A, US 2223119A, US-A-2223119, US2223119 A, US2223119A
InventorsHeinrich Muller
Original AssigneeHeinrich Muller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy automobile
US 2223119 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 26, 1940. H. MULLER TOY AUTOMOBILE Filed March 13. 1939 2 sheets-sheet 2 Patented Nov. 26, 1940 PATENT OFFICE 2,223,119 'roy AUToMonmE Heinrich Mller, Nuremberg, Germany Application March 13,

1939, serial No. 261,615

In Germany October 20, 1938 7 Claims.

separately arranged clockwork mechanism, both' during the movement of the toy motor car and when it is stationary, at any desired intervals and for any desired periods, by moving a portion of the toy. The signal release mechanism, together with the separate clockwork mechanism controlled by it, which operates the acoustic signalling arrangement, is mounted in or upon the toy.

In the embodiments illustrated the toy motor i vehicle has the shape of an open automobile, and, as in actual practice, the releasearrangement is fitted in or on the steering wheel.v Whether the steering wheel itself is arranged to turn or is only an imitationis immaterial as far as the invention is concerned. If the acoustic signalling device is arranged as a push-button onta turning steering wheel las is usually the case in actual practice, then the attraction and possibilities of the toy are'considerably enhanced. The signal release mechanism is such that it allows the separate `signal clockwork to run as long as the release device is actuated by the hand.

A rotating member is provided on the signal clockwork, which is rotated when the mechanism is running down and strikes against a hollow metal body or against thecar body. This produces a noise resembling the acoustic signals of areal automobile. The provision of a separate clockwork mechanism for giving the audible signals enables`it to be used even for toys without driving mechanism, but the invention is primarily intended to be applied to mechanically propelled toys.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings by way of example, but it is understood that the invention is not restricted to the embodiments herein shown. In the drawings,

Figure 1 shows in side elevation, partly in section, a toy motor vehicle in which a separate signalling clockwork mechanism is shown, wherein the .signal is produced by pressing'a button iitted to the steering wheel;

Figure 2 shows in side elevation, partly in section, an arrangement similar to Fig. 1,'in which the signal release is also-eiected by pressing a 5 button on the steering wheel;

Figure 3 is a plan of the steering wheel, look. ing in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 2;

Figure 4 is an axial section of the upper part of the steering column of Fig. 2; Figure 5 is a plan 'of the push-button of Fig. 4, looking 'in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 2;

Figure 6 shows inside elevationpartly in section an embodiment in which the whole of the steering column is displaced axially for-the pur- `l5 pose of releasing the signal mechanism;

Figure 7 shows in side elevation partly in section, an embodiment in which the whole of the steering columnis axially displaced to produce the signal, the signal clockwork mechanism bego ingpartly built into the signal gong, and a dummy press-buttonV being provided;

Figure 8 is a part plan of Fig. 7, with a gong,

in section; v

Figure 9 shows'in elevation, partly in sec- 25 tiqn, an embodiment in which the signal is reproduced by rocking the steering column about its bottom bearing. e 4 The toy motor car .illustrated in Fig. 1 is. provided witha base I, on which a body 2, contain- -30 ingga known type of clockwork mechanism I for fdriying the rear wheels'l, is mounted. The propelling clockwork is wound up by means of a square spindle 5. In the front part of the body 2 is secured to the base I afrarne 6, which con- 35 tains the acoustic signal operating parts. In this .frame is journalled a shaft 1 one end of which is provided witlnajsquared spindle 8, for winding up a spring 9, mounted on the said shaft. The sha'ft 'I also carries a toothed wheel I0, bywhich 40 a shaft II vis rotated by means of a known type of drive. The said shaft II projects above the top portion of the frame 6 andcarries a cross member I2, to the ends I3 and I4 whereof centrifugal weights I5 and I6 are attached. 4 To the frame I is also secured a gong I1, against the rear of which the weights I5 and I6 strike when the -shaft IIrotates, "thus producing a noise resembling thatof a real automobile.

A partition I8 forming a dash-board is also se- 50;'

n ameter of which is such that it. acts as a stop which actuates the stub axles 29 and the frontiwheels 30. When the steering Wheel is turned the front wheels are also turned, thus enabling the toy to run in circles. r

" A push-button 3 I, which slides in the recess 2| of the steering wheel, is also attached to the steering column 23. 'I'he push-button 3| i's controlled by a spring 32, which abuts against the bottom of the recess 2| and against the pushbutton. The said spring forces the steering column upwards until 4it abuts against the collar 21- on the shoulder 24.

The steering column 23 is also Vprovided with a disc or washer 33 rigidly fixed thereto, the difor the. ends I3 and I4 of the cross member I2,

thus preventing the said cross member from rotating when the spring 9 is Wound up. If

the push-button 3| is depressed, then the steering column 23 and the washer 33 aillxed thereto --move with it against the pressure` of the spring 32, so that the ends I3 and I4 of the cross member 'I2 are released, and the latter is then rotated bythe spring 9. Owing to centrifugal force, the weights |5 and I6 strike against the base of the gong I1 and produce a harsh noise.

e When the pressure on'the button 3| is released,

the steering column is pulled back by the spring 32, so that the washer 33 stops the movement of the ends I3 and I4 of the cross member, and consequently stops' the production of sound.

The arrangement illustrated in Figs. 42, 3,4 and 5 is similar to that of Fig. 1, except that the steering column 23 is not adapted to slide in the shoulder piec'e 24, though it is arranged rotatably therein. YIr this case the push-button 3| is provided with four lugs 34, 35, 36 and 31. The bottom of the steering wheel 20 is provided with slots 38, 39, 40 and 4|-, corresponding to the lugs 34 to 31 and through -these slots the said lugs f project. Inside the steering head a spring 32 is arranged between the steering head and pushbutton. After the lugs 34 to 31 have been inserted through the slots the lugs 34 and 35 are bent lback behind the wall I8, thus preventing the from being withdrawn. The ends ofthe lugs 36, and 31 are iixed to a disc 42, which is loosely mounted on the steering column. The disc y42 rests against a shoulder 43 `on a lever 44, which is pivotedI at 45 to the base I of l the t'oy motor. vehicle and is controlledby a pull spring 46. By means of theV spring 46 the `end 4 1 of the lever 44 is Abrought intov the track of the ends I3 and I4 of the cross member I2, so that -the said ends are stopped by the shoulder 41. When a signal is to be given by depressing the button 3|, the disc 42 slidesdown the column against the action of the spring 32, and .through the medium of the shoulder 43 the'lever 44 is rocked on its pivot 45 against the pull ofthe springv ,46, thus releasing the ends I3 and I4 of the cross member. When the pressure o n the button 3| is removed the springs 32 and 46 bring back the disc 42, and .the lever 44 is again moved sring'46`fthus stopping the signal:

The. embodiment illustrated in Fig shows into thegtrack of the ends I3 `and.|4 .by the a steering column 23 similarto that shown inof the drawings.

Fig. 1. They column 23 is mounted in the bentup portion 24 vat 25 and is provided with a portion 26 of small diameter and with a collar 21. A spring 48 is arranged in the recessed portion 26. The steering wheel 20 is xed to the column 23. An abutment 49 isalso tted to the column 23, and abuts against an extension 50 of a lever 5I. This lever is pivotally mounted on thebase I, and 'is controlled by a spring 46.,y The said lever is provided withxa shoulder 53, which is brought into'thetIack of the ends I3'and I4 of the cross member for the purpose of stopping the movementas previously explained in regard to Fig. 2. When the springcontrolled pushbutton, which is preferably marked, is depressed by pressing the steering wheel 20, this pressure is transmitted by the shoulder 49 to the portion 50 of the lever, thus -moving the shoulder 53 out of the track of the ends I3 and I4, so that the cross member I2 can rotate. During this movement the spring 46 is tensioned, and when the pressure on the steering wheel is released the steering column 23 is moved back by .the spring 48, and, the lever 5I is 'also pulled back into 'its original position by the spring 46, so that it 'again comes within the track of the cross member ends I3 and I4.

According to Figs. V'7 and 8 the-steering column 23 is arranged to slide longitudinally and is conltrolled by a spring 54, which abuts against the partition I8 and against .the lower end of the steering'wheel'20. The steering wheel is provided with a driving push-button 3|-, controlled by a spring 55, but the movement' of this push-l button is .only imitative and has no connection with the reproduction of the signal itself. On the column 23 is mounted a disc 33,.the purpose of which is to stop the rotation of the ends I3 'and I4 of the cross member I2 inthe same way as in Fig. 1. In-this embodiment the frame 6 of the driving mechanism is partly fitted inside the gbng I1, th'us saving space. In thisv ar-v rangement steering is effected by the splined shaft 23 and a rack 56, which is mounted on a coupling rod -51. The rod 51 engages in the steering swivels or stub axles 58 and 59 of the front wheels 30. The steering swivels 53 and 59 are rotatably mounted vat 6I) and 6|.

I n the embodiment illustrated by Fig. 9 the steering-column 23 is mounted at 25 in the bentup portion 24 with a certain amount of play, so that it can swingabout this bearing in the plane 'Ihe partition I8 is provided with a corresponding opening 62, which enables the control column to be rocked downwards. A disc 63 is iixed on the column 23. The edge 64 of this disc co-operates with the edge 65 of a.

lever 61 pivoted to the iioor Iof vthe car at 66.

T helever 61 is controlled by 'a spring 46, which tends to push the steering column upwards. 1 If the steering column 23 is pressed down in the direction of the arrow towards the base I, then the edge 64 slides along-the inclined edge 6 5 and' brings the stop 68 out of the track of the ends I3 and I4 of the cross member, which can then be rotated by the spring 9. When the pressure onthe steering wheel is released the spring 46 returns the steering column shown in Fig. 9.

What' -I-claim is: 1. A toy motor vehicle,`comprising a car body,

23 tothe position a steering wheel journalled vin the car body, a

bar rotatably mounted'at its mid point on the car body, clockwork mechanisml for rotating the a push button mounted on the steering wheel fordisengaging the said stopping means, a gong attached to the car body, and centrifugal Weights connected to the ends of the rotatable bar and adapted tostrike the gong when the bar rotates.

2. A toy -motor vehicle, comprising a car body, a steering column longitudinally slidable in the car body, a steering Wheel at the upper end of the steering column, a spring resisting ,downward longitudinal movement of the steering column, a bar rotatably mounted at its mid point on the car body, clockwork mechanism for rotating the bar, means for stopping the rotation of the bar, the said stopping means being disengaged by a downward longitudinal movement of theV steering column, a gong attached to the /car body, and centrifugal weights connected to the ends of the rotatable bar and adapted to strike the gong when the bar rotates.

3. A toy motor vehicle, comprising a car body, a steering wheel journalled in the car body, a bar rotatably mounted at its mid point on the car body, clockwork mechanism for rotating the bar, a stopping lever pivotally mounted on the car body and capable of being rocked into a position in which it intercepts 'the rotatable bar, a push buttonmounted on the steering wheel for disengaging the stopping lever from the rotatable bar, a gong attached to the car body, and

centrifugal weights connected to the ends of' car body, clockwork mechanism for rotating the bar, a stopping lever pivotally mounted on the car body and capable of being rocked into a position in which it intercepts the rotatable bar, a spring constantly tending to keep the stopping lever engaged with the rotatable bar, a push button mounted on the steering wheel for disengaging the stopping lever from the rotatable bar, ay gong attached to the car body, and centrifugal weights connected to the ends of the rotatable bar and adapted to strike the gong when the bar rotates.

5. A toy motor vehicle, comprising a car body,

va steering column longitudinally slidable in the car body, a bar rotatably mounted at its mid point on the car body, clockwork mechanism for rotating the bar, a stopping lever pivotally mounted on the car body and capable of .being rocked into a position in which it intercepts the rotatable bar, the stopping lever being formed with an aperture through which the steering' column passes, a shoulder on the steering column adapted to rock the stopping lever out of engagement with the rotatable bar when the steering column is depressed, a gong attached to the car body, and centrifugal weights connected to the ends of the rotatable bar and adapted to strike the gong when the bar rotates.A

6. A toy motor vehicle, comprising a car body, a steering column longitudinally slidable in the car body, a steering wheel at the upper end of the steering column, a spring resisting downward longitudinal movement of the 'steering column, a. bar rotatably mounted at its mid point on the car body, clockwork mechanism for rotating the bar, means for stopping the rotation of the bar, the said 'stopping means being disengaged by a downward longitudinal movement of the steering column, a gong attached to the car body, centrifugal weights connected to the ends of the rotatable bar and adapted to strike the gong when the bar rotates, and a springcontrolled dummy push button o n the steering Wheel.

7. A toy motor vehicle, comprising a car body, a bar rotatably mounted at its mid point on the car body, clockwork mechanism for rotating the bar, a steering column movably mounted in the car body,` a steering wheel at the upper end of the steering column, a stopping lever pivotally mounted on the car body and capable of being rocked into a position in which it intercepts the rotatable bar, a spring constantly tending to keep the stopping lever engaged with the rotatable bar, means mounted on the steering column for disengaging the stopping lever from the rotatable bar when the steering column is moved, a gong attached to the car body, and centrifugal weights connected to the ends of the rotatable bar and adapted to' strike the gong when the bar rotates.

' HEJNRICH MLLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2623328 *Jul 13, 1948Dec 30, 1952Louis Marx & CompanyToy vehicle with simulated horn
US2624154 *Oct 20, 1950Jan 6, 1953Felix PlawnerWheeled sounding toy
US3190034 *Dec 9, 1964Jun 22, 1965Ryan John WDevice for simulating motor sounds
US3236008 *Oct 2, 1963Feb 22, 1966Mattel IncDevice for simulating motor sounds in a wheeled toy
US3286393 *Apr 16, 1965Nov 22, 1966Mattel IncToy sound device adapted to actuate a resonator by repetitive shock excitation
US3392484 *Feb 28, 1966Jul 16, 1968Mattel IncToy rocket launching vehicle
US4282674 *Feb 4, 1980Aug 11, 1981Marvin Glass & AssociatesToy cash register
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/414
International ClassificationA63H29/04, A63H29/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H29/04
European ClassificationA63H29/04