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Publication numberUS2223794 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 3, 1940
Filing dateOct 10, 1938
Priority dateOct 10, 1938
Publication numberUS 2223794 A, US 2223794A, US-A-2223794, US2223794 A, US2223794A
InventorsHermson John H, Pierce Howard M
Original AssigneeSpalding A G & Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleat
US 2223794 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

es. 3, 1940. H. M. PIERCE ET AL 2 CLEAT Filed Oct. 10, 1938 INVENIOR Howard M. Pl6f6'6 Jgz H- Her/175m ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 3, 1940 UNITED STATES CLEAT Howard M. Pierce and John H. Hermson, Brooklyn, N. Y., assignors to A. G. Spalding & Bros.

Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporationiof Dela-' ware Application October 10, 1938, Serial No. 234,151

11 Claims.

The present invention relates to improvements in devices for securing cleats, spikes or the like to the sole of various sport shoes.

It has been a well-known expedient for some timeto secure substantially solid cleats, spikes or the like removably to the sole of a shoe by fixedly mounting a threaded stem either on the sole or on the cleat or the like, and by screwing thecleat onto said stem and into contact with the sole, orthe stem on the cleat into the sole, respectively.

However, prior to this invention it has been a problem to find a simple, safe and inexpensive manner of securing thecleat or the liketo a 15 sole by means of a single screw in such a manner that the cleat during use of the shoe could not turn relative to the sole or even be screwed off the sole if inadvertently twisted in the loosening direction.

Various types of means have been previously suggested to prevent such undesired turning or loosening of the cleats or the like, and these means generally consisted of knoblike projections or radial serrations on the upper face of the cleat 2 which were designed to interengage with corresponding depressions or serrations provided on the surface of the sole. However, a locking against turning of such cleats or the like could be obtained only if either the cleat or the sole or both, consisted of yielding material since the presence of the projections would otherwise prevent'both a tightening of the cleat fully against the sole and interengagement of the projections or depressions on the face of the sole.

Other suggestions prior to the present invention for locking cleats or the like against withdrawal movement included the provision of separate elements such as nails, rivets or the like which were driven through the cleat and into the sole eccentrically of the threaded stem, after the cleat was fully screwed into contact with the sole, and which therefore precluded a relatively easy exchangeability of the cleat.

It is the principal object of the present invention to provide a cleat, spike or the like which may be removably secured to a leather sole of a shoe by a single central screw, be fully tightened into contact with the sole and automatically locked against withdrawal movement from the sole during normal use of the shoe.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a cleat which, when screwed tightly against a sole, will be uniformly in contact thereon the cleat with the corresponding projections with, despite any unevenness of the sole, so as to avoid tilting or twisting of the cleat'relative to the sole and'its mounting screw.

An important feature of the present invention is the provision of means on theseating surface of a cleat or the like which have the tendency to bite into the leather of the sole when the cleat is screwed into contact therewith; and to lock the cleat against unintentional withdrawal movement. 10

Another feature of the invention is" the provision of means on the seating surface of a cleat or the like which have the tendency to even off or remove any unevenness on th'esurface of the sole when the cleat is tightened against the sole, 15 and to shape the affected portion of the sole to conform with the seating, surface of the cleat.

A complementary feature of the invention resides in providing a central'aperture in the upper or seating surface of a cleat, and serrations or ridges on the seating surface extending. outwardly of the aperture in the general direction of the threads on the screw which secures the cleat to thevsole, so that upon tightening of the cleat against the sole, the serrations or ridges scrape, raise or cut off a certain amount of leather from the sole and convey the sametoward the center of the seating surface of the cleat.

A further important feature of the invention, complementary to those stated above; is that the grooves which are formed intermediate adjacent ridges gradually decrease in width from their peripheral toward their inner. ends, wherebythe leather portions severed, partially severed, deformed or deflected from the sole by the ridges, I are compressed as they move toward the center to build up or even out anydepression in the sole, and particularly to pack these portions into the grooves sufficiently to resist any withdrawal movement of the cleat and thus, in cooperation 40 with the ridges, to form locking means for the cleat.

Another feature of the invention is the provisionof the seating surface of the cleat with grooves and ridges of the type stated above, which, however, extend in the opposite direction to the direction of the screw threads of the mounting screw, so that, when the cleat is tightly applied against the sole and an attempt is made to turn off the cleat from the sole, the ridges wedge into the leather and resist such movement, while the surface portions of leather removed either partially or entirely from the sole by such slight movement are deflected toward the center of the seating surface and are packed within the grooves to resist any further movement of the cleat.

A further complementary feature of the invention is the provision of a central aperture in the upper surface of the cleat, and serrations or ridges on said surface extending from the periphery thereof toward the aperture and at an angle to the radii of said surface.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of spirally curved ridges or serrations on the seating surface of the cleat extending from the central aperture toward the periphery thereof.

A further feature of the present invention is the formation and shaping of such serrations or ridges on the seating surface of a cleat by means of grinding.

Still another feature is the provision of ridges of the type described above which decrease in height from the outer periphery of the seating surface of the cleat toward the inside thereof.

A further feature of the invention is the provision of a washerlike element secured either to the sole of a shoe or to the seating surface of the cleat, and provided with serrations or ridges of the type described for locking the cleat against unintentional removal from the sole.

These and other objects, features and advantages will appear from the followingdetail description of the invention and from the drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a cross-section through a shoe provided with a cleat according to the invention.

Fig. 2 is a top view of a cleat according to one embodiment of the present invention.

Fig. 3 is a side view, partly in section, of the cleat shown in Fig. 2. v

Fig. 4 is a top view of a cleat according to another embodiment of the invention.

' Fig. 5 is a side view, partly in section, of the cleat shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a top view of a cleat according to a further embodiment of the invention.

Fig. '7 is a side view, partly in section, of the cleat shown in Fig. 6. I

Fig. 8 is a top View of another modification of the present invention.

- Fig. 9 is a side view, partly in section, of the modification shown in Fig. 8.

Before describing the present improvements and mode of operation thereof in detail it should be understood that the invention is not limited to the details of construction and arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawing, which are merely illustrative of the present preferred embodiments, since the invention is capable of other embodiments, and the phraseology employed is for the purpose of description and not of limitation.

Referring particularly to the drawing, a metal sole plate 2|] provided with suitable noncircular apertures 2| is mounted between the main and outer or tap soles 23 and 22, respectively, of a shoe 24. Suitable apertures 25 are formed in the soles 22 and 23 coaxially with the corresponding apertures 2| in the sole plate 20, and stud members 26 each having an, enlarged conical head 21 and lateral flanges 28 are fitted tightly into the apertures 2| and 25 in the sole plate 20 and the soles 22 and 23 so that the-flanges 28 of the stud members 23 are seated'within the noncircular apertures 2| of the sole plate and are locked by the walls thereof against rotation.

Inasmuch as the tread surface of an outer sole,

particularly of certain types of athletic shoes, usually is considerably curved and relatively uneven, the contact between the seating surface of a cleat or the like and the sole is often not uniform, and while some portions of the seating surface are in contact with the sole, others are not. Consequently, the cleat or spike is not firmly seated on the sole and will gradually work loose during use of the shoe both from the sole as also from its threaded stem. In order to overcome this disadvantage effectively, the present invention, as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, provides a cleat, spike or the like 29 which comprises a body 33 having an annular seating portion 3| and a circular central aperture 32 at its upper end. A plurality of substantially equally spaced grooves 33 are provided in the face of seating portion 3|, extending from the periphery 34 thereof toward the aperture 32 and at an angle to the radii of such seating portion, so as to decrease considerably in width from their outer toward their inner ends, as shown particularly in Fig. 2, and to form intermediate ridges 35, the upper ends 36 of which preferably are inclined or sharpened toward one side to form biting or cutting edges 31.

For securing the cleat 29 or the like to the outer or tap sole 22, a threaded stem 38 is either fixedly mounted within the body 30 of the cleat and centrally of aperture 32, as shown in Fig. 3, while the stud member 26 is provided with a threaded aperture complementary of stem 38, or the stem 38 may be fixedly mounted on the stud member 26, or be integral therewith, and ,a threaded central aperture 39 may be provided in the body 3|], as shown for examplein Fig. 5. Thus, the cleat 29 may be screwed tightly onto the tread surface 40 of the sole 22.

If such a cleat 29, which is provided with ridges 35 and cutting edges 31, is screwed onto the tread surface 40 of the outer sole 22, these cutting edges 3! will act similar to a milling cutter and cut or wedge into the leather of the sole, and move or at least partially sever surface portions thereof which are received in grooves 33 so as to fill out the same. Because of the angularity of the front walls 42 of ridges 35 relative to the periphery 34, these portions of leather slide along walls 42 toward the central aperture 32.

Since the studs 26 are securely mounted within the soles, each cleat 29 may be screwed so tightly against the outer sole 22 that an annular groove 43 is cut into the same by the cutting edges 31 as indicated in Fig. 1. Thus, the ridges 35 are embedded at least substantially within such groove 43, and the entire upper ends 36 of all the ridges 35 are wedged uniformly into the bottom of groove 43, while the grooves 33 intermediate ridges 35 are filled out by the leather portions severed or flowed from the sole by cutting edges 3'|. Furthermore, since grooves 33 decrease in width considerably from their outer toward their inner ends, the leather portions in these grooves are strongly compressed as they move toward the aperture 32 whereby they press against the sole and build up any depressions therein, so that the entire seating surface of the cleat, formed by the upper ends 35 of ridges 35 and the bottom of grooves 33, is in full contact with the sole 22.

Unintentional withdrawal movement of the cleat 29 is also effectively prevented by such tight packing of the severed leather portions and their 44, respectively; of ridges 35. Thuathe cleat 29 islocked securely againstv movement in both-.directions, and because of the uniform'conta'ct of the upper ends36 of all ridges 35with thesole 22, it cannot wriggle or twist in any direction relative to the sole, or gradually workl loose from thesstem 38 or the sole 22.

According to the modification of the invention, shown in Figs. 4 and 5, grooves. 33' arespirally curved from theperiphery 34 toward the aperture 32 andthe Walls thereof are of substantially semicircular cross-section. The upper ends of adjacent grooves 33': merge into relatively sharp, knifelike ridges 35, the height of whichmay be decreased toward the aperture 32, as shown in Fig. 5, so that the peripheral portions of ridges 35' have a tendency to wedge or cut deeper'into the sole leather than theinnerends thereof to insure to astill greater extent that the peripheral portions particularly are fully and firmly in contact with the sole when the. cleat is applied thereto.

Grooves 33 may be formed of any suitable depth, and the shape. and number of these grooves and theridges 35 may likewisebe modified to a considerable extent. For-example, as shown in Figs. 6 and .7, a large number of grooves 33a of relatively shallow depth may be provided in the upper end of the. cleat, so as to form. short ridges 35a of a shape substantially similar to that of ridges 35' shown in Figs.'4 and 5.

.The grooves 33, 33' and 33a and ridges 35, 35' and 35a, respectively, may be formed by any suitable method, depending to some extent on the depth and shape thereof. For example, while the grooves 33 and ridges 35 according to Figs. 2 and 3 may be formed during the molding of the cleat, grooves 33 and 33a. according to Figs. 4 to 7, respectively, are preferably formed by grinding the same into the upper end of the cleat.

According to still another modification of the present invention, shown in Figs. 8 and 9, the means for wedging or cutting into the sole leather, and for locking the cleat against unintentional withdrawal movement may be formed as a separate element in the form of a washer 45, preferably of sheet metal, which .is stamped to provide therein corrugations, forming ridges 35b and intermediate grooves 33b of any suitable shape as described relative to Figs. 1 to 7. A plurality of prongs 46 'are stamped out of the washer 45 by means of which the latter may be secured to the fiat upper surface of a cleat of conventional construction to convert the same into a self-locking cleat similar to those described above.

Such a washer 45 is particularly applicable to provide a cleat consisting of a material softer than the sole, for example rubber or the like, with a seating surface which is harder than the sole and which may bite into the sole to lock the cleat thereto in the manner described.

If desirable, instead of securing the washer 45 to the upper surface of the cleat, it may also be secured to the tread surface of the outer sole coaxially with the stud 26. In that event, the ridges 35b cut or bite into the upper surface of the cleat to lock the same against rotation in a similar manner as the ridges according to Figs. 1 to 7 bite into the leather of the sole 22, as previously described.

Although in the above description of the invention, it has been assumed that the grooves 33 and ridges 35 extend in the same direction in which the cleat is screwed into contact with the sole, the present invention is also applicable to such grooves and ridges which extend in a direction opposite to the direction of the screw threads of the mounting screw 38. In that event, the screw threads on screw 38 as shown in Figs. 1, 3, 5 and 7 may be left handed. Also, the screw 38 may be provided with right-handed threads as shown, and the ridges and grooves be made of substantially the same shape and form, but extending in the opposite direction to that shown in Figs. 2, 4, 6 and 8. If a cleat, provided with such grooves 33 and ridges 35 which are opposed to the direction of the threads of screw 38, is screwed tightly against the sole, the ridges 35 ride over the surface of the sole without cutting or wedging into the same. If, however, after tightening and during use of the shoe, considerable'force is applied tending to turn off the cleat from the sole, ridges 35 immediately dig or wedge into the leather and sever or flow surf-ace portions thereof which are received in grooves 33 and de flected toward the center of the seating surface ofthe cleat, and packed within the grooves because of their decreasing width, substantially as described relative to Figs. 1 to 9. Thus, unintentional withdrawal movement is substantially and very effectively prevented by the combined action of ridges 35 wedging into the surface of the sole, and of grooves 33 bunching up or packing the severed portions so as to press both against the'sole and. the side walls 42 and 44 of ridges 35.

Although in the drawing the cleat-locking means according to the present invention have been illustrated in combination with only one general type of cleat, it should be understood that the invention is equally applicable to any other type of cleats, spikes or similar means.

Variations and modifications may be made within the scope of this invention and portions of the improvements may be used without others.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new is: g

1. A cleat or the like comprising a body; connecting means for securing said cleat to the sole of a shoe; means on the upper face of said cleat adapted to cut into said sole when the cleat is rotatably applied against the same about a center of rotation to force portions of said sole inwardly toward the center of rotation, and concurrently to lock said cleat against removal from said sole.

2. A cleat or the like comprising a body; connecting means for securing said cleat to the sole of a shoe; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to the sole including a plurality of spaced ridges on the upper face of said cleat, each extending inwardly from the periphery of said face in a direction angularly offset to the radius thereof.

3. A cleat or the like comprising a body; connecting means including a screw for securing said cleat to the sole of a shoe; means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to the sole including a plurality of spaced ridges on the upper face of said cleat, each extending inwardly from the periphery of said face in a direction angularly offset to the radius thereof; and cutting edges on said ridges adapted to bite into said sole and to sever surface portions thereof when the cleat is screwed thereto by rotating the same in one direction.

4. A cleat or the like comprising a body; connecting means for securing said cleat to the sole of a shoe; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to the sole, including a plurality -of spaced spirally curved ridges on the upper surface of said cleat.

5. A cleat or the like comprising a body; connecting means for securing said cleat to the sole ofa shoe; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to the sole, including a plurality of spaced spirally curved ridges on the upper'surface of said cleat, the outer ends of which are higher than their inner ends.

6 In combination, a shoe sole having a seating surface; a dead having an opposed seating surface at its upper end, adapted to be rotated relative to said sole about an axis of rotation; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to said sole, including a plate secured at one side to one of said surfaces and having at its other side a plurality of spaced ridges projecting toward the other of said surfaces, said ridges extending outwardly relative to said axis of rotation and being respectively inclined relative to the radii extending from said axis of rotation.

7. A cleat for the sole of a shoe, comprising a body adapted to be rot-atably applied to said sole; a seating face on said body; and a plurality of ground grooves on the seating face, respectively inclined relative to the radii of said face.

8. In combination, a shoe sole having a seating surface; a cleat having an opposed seating surface at its upper end, adapted to be rotated relative to said sole about an axis of rotation to connect the cleat to said sole; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to said sole, including a plurality of spaced ridges projecting from one of said seating surfaces toward the other of said seating surfaces, said ridges extending outwardly relative said axis of rotation and being respectively inclined relative to the radii extending from said axis rotation.

9. A cleat or the like comprising a body; conn'ecting means for securing said cleat to the sole of a shoe; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to said sole, including a plurality of spaced ridges on the'upper surface of said cleat, extending inwardly relative to the periphery of said upper surface,1 respectively inclined relative to the radii thereof and the outer ends of said ridges being higher than the inner ends.

10. In combination, a shoe sole having a seating surface; a cleat having an opposed seating surface at its upper end, adapted to be rotated relative to said sole about an axis of rotation to connect the cleat to said sole; and means for looking saidcleat against rotation relative to said sole, including a plurality of spaced ridges projecting from one of said seating surfaces toward the other of said seating surfaces, said ridges extending outwardly'relative to'said axis of rotation, being spaced apart a progressively greater extent from their inner-toward their outer ends and being resepctively inclined relative to the radii extending from said axis rotation.

11. In combination, a shoe sole having a seating surface; a cleat having an opposed seating surface at its upper end, adapted to be rotated relative to said sole about an axis of rotation to connect the cleat to said sole; and means for locking said cleat against rotation relative to said sole, including a plurality of spaced ridges projecting from one of said seating surfaces toward the other of said seating surfaces, said ridges extending outwardly relative said axis of rotation and being respectively inclined relative to the radii extending from said axis rotation, said inclination being in the direction of rotation which moves the cleat toward the sole.

HOWARD M. PIERCE. JOHN H. I-IERMSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2784503 *Jun 29, 1954Mar 12, 1957Anderson John WShakeproof screw fastening
US2911738 *Aug 27, 1958Nov 10, 1959Clerke John AAthletic shoe cleat
US3331148 *Sep 29, 1964Jul 18, 1967Hollister Solomon CCleat means for athletic shoes
US4648187 *Jul 18, 1985Mar 10, 1987Puma Ag Rudolf Dassler SportAthletic shoe sole with cleats having threaded exchangeable gripping elements
US5065534 *May 5, 1987Nov 19, 1991Trisport Ltd.Studs for footwear
US5123184 *Nov 23, 1987Jun 23, 1992Ferreira Joseph JRemovable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
US5524367 *Apr 8, 1992Jun 11, 1996Trisport, Ltd.Removable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
US5887371 *Feb 18, 1997Mar 30, 1999Curley, Jr.; John J.Footwear cleat
US5974700 *Aug 21, 1998Nov 2, 1999Trisport LimitedShoe cleats
US6094843 *Dec 9, 1998Aug 1, 2000Softspikes, Inc.Footwear cleat
US6138386 *Jan 22, 1999Oct 31, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Composite cleat for athletic shoe
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US6272774Oct 18, 1999Aug 14, 2001Trisport LimitedShoe cleats
US6381878Oct 31, 2000May 7, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Composite cleat for athletic shoe
US6631571Jan 18, 2002Oct 14, 2003Mcmullin Faris W.Shoe cleat connector
US6810608Jul 16, 2001Nov 2, 2004Trisport LimitedShoe cleats
US6834445Jul 16, 2002Dec 28, 2004Softspikes, LlcShoe cleat with improved traction
US6834446Aug 27, 2002Dec 28, 2004Softspikes, LlcIndexable shoe cleat with improved traction
US7040043Aug 11, 2004May 9, 2006Softspikes, LlcShoe cleat
EP1728448A1May 31, 2005Dec 6, 2006Lotto Sport Italia S.p.A.An interchangeable stud structure for sports shoes
WO1989004616A1 *Nov 22, 1988Jun 1, 1989Foot-Joy, Inc.Removable shoe spike lockable to configured sole plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 36/67.00D
International ClassificationA43C15/16, A43C15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/161
European ClassificationA43C15/16A