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Publication numberUS2225145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1940
Filing dateAug 1, 1938
Priority dateAug 1, 1938
Publication numberUS 2225145 A, US 2225145A, US-A-2225145, US2225145 A, US2225145A
InventorsBaumbach Emil A
Original AssigneeBaumbach Emil A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-aligning leader pin oiler
US 2225145 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 17, 1940- E. A. BAUMBACH 2,225,145

SELF-ALIGNING LEADER PIN OILER Filed Aug. 1, 1958 5472?? Q fim AW Patented Dec. 17, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT" OFFICE I 2,225,145 SELF-ALIGNING LEADER PIN OILER Emil A. .Baumbach, Chicago, Ill. Application August 1, 1938, Serial No, 222,370

3 Claims. (o1. s0-s-5) This invention relates to die sets and more particularly to improvements 'in self-aligning leader pin oilers associated therewith. This invention is animprovement over the disclosure of my co-pending application Serial No. 193,865, filed March 4, 1938, and which culminated in Patent No. 2,181,360.

It is of particular importance that proper lubrication of leader pins used in punch and die sets be assuredat all times and also that such lubrication be free from dirt, grime; and other foreign matter. The function of leader pins in punch and die sets is to retain the lower die shoe and the upper punch head in proper alignmentthroughout their relative movement so that the punch and die supported by these respective parts may always engage in identically the. same relationship. As the tolerance per mitted in the aligning of punches and dies is very slight, leader pins and their assembly must not only be exceedingly accurate, but also should retain their accuracy throughout the life of the die sets. Proper lubrication is one means whereby the active life of punch and die sets may be extended. To insure the retention of this accuracy, it has become common practice to harden either the leader pins or the leader pin bushings, or both, and toinsure long life it is also desirable to employ the longest'leader pin bushings possible consistent with the thickness of the punch'head and other mechanical limitations.

In my aboveidentified co-pending application I disclose a' supplementary leader; pin oiler which may removably be attached to an leader pin set as desired, the use of which permits the employment of long leader pin bushings and obviates the necessity for counterboring the punch head to receive oilers inserted therein.

In the present invention I disclose a similar device which, in addition, provides many structural and functional advantages, particularly with respect to simplicity of construction, by the use of a minimum number of easily assembled parts whereby the cost of manufacture isreduced and by the provision of means for selfaligning of the oiler whereby metallic friction and consequent rapid wear are eliminated. 1

A salient feature of this invention is its selfaligning characteristics wherebythe lubricator is automatically kept in alignment with respect to the axis of the leader pin and whereby a consistently true and accurate spacing of the parts may be insured at all times.

Another equally important feature of this invention is the provision ofa compression spring to keep the oiler in contact with the punch head, which spring is in the shape of an inverted cone. By the use of this; spring, mechanical friction between the spring and the leaderpin it surrounds is totally eliminated, with a consequent elimination of wear on'bo-th spring and leader pin.

Referring to the drawing Figure 1 is a vertical sectional View through a die set and illustrates two of the oilers in operating position. 7 s

Fig. 2 is an enlarged and expanded perspective view in longitudinal section of the wick housing and cover. 1

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view through the wick housing and casing as assembled.

Fig: 4- is a adapted for-usein the wick housing.

Referring to the drawing in detail, in Figure l the usual punch and die set is-shown comprising the die shoe I, the upwardly extending leader pins 2', and the vertically reciprocating punch head 3. a The punch head 3 is usually provided with bushings 4 surrounding the leader pins, and, aspreviously indicated, it is of importance that these bushings be as long as conveniently possible so that the greatest amount of bearing surfaceis "present within the necessary mechanical limitations. I

Disposed about each of the leader pins and positioned immediatelybelowthe moving punch head '3 isan oil wick- 6 encased within a wick housing and slidably mounted on each of the leader pins. As shown, the wick housing 5 .is spaced from the leader pin and there is therefore no metallic contact of thewick housing with the leader pin. 1 To prevent misalign ient and the consequent metal contactand wear and also to protect said wick from dustlandhard blows, the wick and its housing are contained within a protective aligning casing T into which the wick housing 5 is adapted to be fitted, its periphery making a press fit with the inner surface 8 of said cover. The covert-alsoha'sa tapered or conical upper portion 9 which is adapted to engage with a similarly inclined portion- It at the end of the leader pin bushi-ng'd. The engagement of these complemental portions serves to center the entire lubricator'with respect to the axis of the leader pins 2 at alltimes.

This same cover 1 is also formed with an outwardly extending periphery ll shaped to topplan view of one form of wick ing area of the die set, while its larger upper portion permits the operator more readily to appreciate movement of the punch holder and therefore advances the warning given to the workman that the punch head is moving. Likewise, the periphery H at the lower end of the oiler is particularly adapted to engage with and seat this portion of the spring and to: transmitthe upward pressure thereof to the inclined aligning face 9.

As the leader pin bushing against which this lubricator bears must have an inclined surface at its lower end, and as these bearings are usually hardened for long wear, it is advisable that a counterbore or tapered surface be given to one end of these bushings before they are hardened. However, it is to be understood that, if desired, such inclined contour may be given the lower end of a hardened bearing by any mechanic through the use of a grinding wheel or other suitable mechanism for machining hardened metal. It is, of course, important thatthis counterbore be accurate and present a surface in true alignment with the axis of the leader pin so that the lubricator casing 1 which bears thereagainst may maintain in accurate alignment the wick housing which it encloses.

It will be noted that the metal wick holder 5 is spaced from the leader pin, and, by the selfaligning characteristic of this oiler, it is kept from tilting or otherwise working into a position where any metal will contact the leader pin with a resulting wear on both of these parts. As the leader pins 2 are customarily provided with a plurality of oil distributing grooves or oil ladders 2, as shown in Fig. 1, it will readily be seen that contact of metal therewith not only greatlyinduces wear, but also any metal portions of the oiler may readily catch in and clog these grooves. By the before-described self-aligning feature of my device, this metal-to-metal contact between moving parts is avoided.

Suitable oil holes may be provided in the cover 1 and the wick housing 5 such as the registering openings 13 and M, respectively. Through these holes additional oil may be added to the felt wick 6 as desired.

Structural changes may, of course, be made without departing from the spirit of my invention; for instance, the wick housing and easing may be integral if desired. Therefore, it is desired that the invention be limited only by the prior art and the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The combination with a die shoe, a leader pin extending upwardly therefrom, and a punch head having an opening large enough to slip over the end of the leader pin and into which said leader pin extends for guiding the punch head, of means for lubricating the leader pin comprising an annular wick surrounding and engaging the leader pin, an annular wick holding and carrying device capable of slipping over the end of the leader pin and surrounding said leader pin and spaced radially therefrom and not connected with said punch head, and a coil compression spring surrounding said leader pin compresed by the downward movement of the punch head and tending to urge said device upwardly toward the punch head, said device having an upper .portion surrounding and spaced from said leader pin and. centered by said punch head so that no part of said annular wick-holding and carrying device is in engagement with the leader pin, said wick being held in and carried by said wick-holding device when the device is separated from the leader pin.

2. The combination with a die shoe having a leader pin secured thereto and a punch holder having an opening through which said leader pin extends, said punch holder being movable up and down with respect to said die shoe, of an annular container and carrier surrounding said leader pin and spaced radially therefrom between said die shoe and punch holder and not connected with said punch holder, said container and carrier having an annular opening on its inner side adjacent the leader pin, a lubricant carrier in and carried by said container projecting inwardly therefrom into engagement with said leader pin, an annular centering member telescoping with respect to said container closely enough to center it and having a tapering self-centering engagement with said punch holder for holding both the container and the centering member out of engagement with said leader pin, said lubricant carrier being held in and carried by said container, and a coil compression spring surrounding said leader pin bearing upwardly on vsaid container for holding it against said punch holder as the punch holder moves up and down whereby when the punch holder moves downwardly it pushes the container ahead of it and whereby when the punch head moves upwardly the spring causes the container to follow up the punch head.

3. The combination with a die shoe having a leader pin secured thereto and a punch holder having an opening through which said leader pin extends, said punch holder being movable up and down with respect to said die shoe, of an annular container surrounding said leader pin and spaced radially therefrom between said die shoe and punch holder and not connected with said punch holder, said container having an annular opening on its inner side adjacent the leader pin, a lubricant carrier in said container projecting inwardly therefrom into engagement with said leader pin, an annular centering member telescoping with respect to said container and having a conical portion in self-centering engagement with said punch holder, and a coil compression spring surrounding said leader pin bearing upwardly on-said container for holding it against said punch holder as the punch holder moves up and down whereby when the punch holder moves downwardly it pushes the container ahead of it and whereby when the punch head moves upwardly the spring causes the container to follow up the punch head, said telescoping member having a downwardly-extending peripheral skirt por tion surrounding and spaced from said annular container, the upper end of said coil spring being seated between said container and skirt portion.

EMIL A. BAUMBACH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2893789 *Jun 20, 1955Jul 7, 1959Heinz William VLubricators
US3392688 *Nov 4, 1966Jul 16, 1968Korsch Spezialfab EmilTablet press
US3578826 *Sep 23, 1969May 18, 1971Kasimir JaniszewskiOiler bushing
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Classifications
U.S. Classification384/13, 72/456
International ClassificationB21D37/00, B21D37/10
Cooperative ClassificationB21D37/10
European ClassificationB21D37/10