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Publication numberUS2227731 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 7, 1941
Filing dateMar 15, 1940
Priority dateMar 15, 1940
Publication numberUS 2227731 A, US 2227731A, US-A-2227731, US2227731 A, US2227731A
InventorsJohn Lynes
Original AssigneeJohn Lynes
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well formation testing and treating tool
US 2227731 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 7, 1941. J. LYNES WELL FORMATION TESTING AND TREATING TOOL 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 15, 1940 7. MT 5 Ol.. 3 A. A. 4A. 7

Jan. 7, 1941. J. L YNEs 2,227,731

WELL FORMATION TESTING AND TREATING TOOL Filed March 15, 1940 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 |7 l L 'J lo l 5' 11i i la 4 O F IE 1 .6o bz 60 V5 le 9 [2i-5.4.

J. LYNES Jan. 7, 1941.

WELL FORMATION TESTING AND TREATlNG TOOL zu lwk. ATTOP/v/Sy 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 hunted Jan. 7, 1941 2,227,731

UNITED sTATEs PATENT oFFlcE WELL FORMATIDN TESTING AND TBEATING TOUL John Lynes, Houston, Tex. Application March 15, 1940, Serial No. 324,025 18 Claims. (Cl. 166--11) The invention relates to a tool and assembly Another object of the invention is to provide for the use thereof wherein the formations in a an assembly which can be set from the surface well bore may be tested to determine the conin position and then manipulated for circulating tents thereof or the formation may be treated by testing and treating operations by moving the introducing chemicals. o1 the folmotion may be assembly a predetermined distance which may be 6 blocked off by introducing cement. gauged from the surface.

It is often desirable in the drilling of wells by Still another object of the invention is to prothe rotary method t0 determine the nature of the vide a hydraulic packer which can be set and reformations which have been penetrated and iIlleased by manipulation of the supporting strucl0 asmuch as the drilling operation is continued by ture, l 1 rotating the bit While Cilolllating a drilling iluid Still another object of the invention is to prointo and out of the well bore it is evident that vide a resilient packer sleeve which can be the static pressure, as well as applied pressure on mounted to contract as it is inflated so as to form this column of drilling mud in the well, often a seal with the wall of the well bore.

block-oil? the more porous formations which are Other and further objects of the invention will -l A penetrated so that it iis impossible to determine be readuy apparent when the following descripthat such a, formation has been encountered untion is considered in connection with the accomder the normal drilling conditions. The present panymg drawings wherein; tool,there'fore contemplates an assembly of struc- Fig, 1 is a, side elevation of the upper end of o ture which can be lowered into the Well bore and the tool showing the rotating connection of the 2 a desired section or portion of the formation tool and the pipe in section, sealed ofi so as to release the pressure of the Fig. 2 is a continuation of the lower end of `c01umn 0f liquid 111 the Well from that formation Fig. l and illustrates the sliding connection beso that any Pressure resident in the formation tween the pipe and the housing so as to manipuwill be available to cause a flow of fluid from the late the tool. formation into thetool, or if it is found that no Fig. 3 is a continuation of the lower end of pressure is present in the formation then a suc- Fig. 2 and illustrates the packer structures and tion may be applied on the tool to cause fluid the lower end of the tool in section. to enter, the tool from the formation; on the Fig. 4 is a sectional view of the upper packer 'other hand liquid may be applied thru the tool which has been inflated and sealed with the tool to treat or cement the formation as desired. having been moved to align the circulating open- In the operation of a tool of this sort in the` ings which are above the packer. well-bore it is desirable to be able to rotate the Fig. 5 shows the same structure as Fig. 4 but 5 pipe at all times and to also circulate the drilling with the tool having been moved an additional 35 liqudeither above or below the tool as circumamount to its maximum downward position so as stances may require so as to prevent sticking to open the tool to the formation. o f the pipe in the bore due to the gelling action Fig. 6 shows the lower end of the tool in the of the column of mud in the bore or the caking position of Fig. 5 with the tool open to the for- 40 of the mud when higher temperatures are presmation and the upper and lower series of open- 40 ent, ings completely closed, so that either pressure or It is one of the objects of the invention to prosuction can be applied to the formation between vide an assembly wherein one or more packers the packers. may be set hydraulically to seal the surface of Fig. /7 shows the lower end of the tool with the well bore and the assembly thereafter opened the parts having been returned to the normal 45 so as to either discharge or receive liquid relaposition so that the packers may deate and tive to the formation. with the tool opened beneath the packers to ap- Another object of the invention is to provide ply pressure in unseating the packers from the a well formation testing and treating tool which formation.

can be lowered to place in the well and set in Fig. 8 shows an enlarged sectional view of the 50 position, to be thereafter manipulated so as to packers and illustrates the manner of charging align a plurality of series of openings for the the packers with liquid when they are to be used. purpose of either circulating above the tool, open- Fig. 9 is a transverse sectional view on the line ing the -tool to receive or discharge uid, or circu- 9-9 of Fig. 8.

- lating below the tool to effect the release thereof. Fig. 10 is a side elevation of the well head as- 55 sembly used for supporting, rotating and positioning the device.

Fig. 11 is an elevation of the mechanism in the well bore in open position to discharge or receive liquid relative to the formation.

Fig. 10 shows the surface of a well which is being tested or'treated with the assembly and illustrates a rotary table 2 which is arranged to be turned in order to rotate the string of pipe 3. which is the operating pipe by which the toolis lowered into and removed from the well and by which liquid under pressure is applied to the tool. This string of pipe 3 may be supported at any desired elevation in the rotary table 2 by means of the slips 4. A flange 5 is carried by the pipe section 6 and is arranged to be supported on the slips 4 by the spacer blocks or members 7. These blocks will be fitted over the slips 4 and beneath the flange 5, so as to determine the elevation of the flange 5. It is intended that various sets of these blocks may be utilized to change the elevation of the iiange 5 relative to the slips 4 after the tool has been set, so that vertical movement of the pipe 3 can be utilized for the manipulation and the opening and closing of the tool, as will be later described.

A swivel or rotatable support 9 is arranged on top of the pipe section 6 and the control or flow line fittings I0 and II are mounted above the swivel 9. These fittings may be used to control the iiow through the pipe 3 either into or out of the well and the upper end I2 of the fitting may be opened to introduce a swab, bailer or other instrument, and to also drop a weight member in order to open one portion of the tool as Will be later described.

The pipe 3 extends downward into the well bore I4 as best seen in Fig. 11 and this pipe may be of any desired length so as to arrange the tool I5 at the desired elevation opposite a formation I6, which is to be tested or treated.

A rotating connection I'I forms a part of the pipe 3 and this connection is best seen in section in Fig. 1 wherein an outstanding flange I8 has the antifriction bearings I9 above and below it, and is confined in a housing 20 by means of a stop ring ZI. In this manner the connection is rotatable but is capable of carrying a pressure therethrough.

The pipe 3 extends below this connection and is arranged to receive the housing 23 which forms the principal part of the testing. and treating tool. 'I'he housing is best seen in Figs 1 and 2 in the position which it will assume as it is lowered into the well. 'Ihe upper end of the housing is formed with a hollow pipe 24 which has an overhanging lip 25 to engage upon a shoulder 26 on the pipe 3, so that the housing will be normally suspended on this shoulder 26 as the parts are lowered into the well` A sliding connection 21 is thus formed between the pipe 3 and the housing 23 so that after the housing is fixed as to elevation the pipe 3 may be lowered for the purpose of operating the tool, as will be later described. The pipe and the housing are non-rotatable relative to each other by virtue of the pin and slot connection 28, as seen in the upper end of Fig. 2.

A nipple 30 is rigidly fixed to the lower end of the pipe 24 and has an opening 3| therein which is one of the uppermost series of openings by which circulation is maintained in the well bore above the tool.

A coupling 32 on the nipple 30 serves as a support for the head 33 which forms the upper end of the top packer 34. The coupling 32 also carries the pipe 35, which is a continuation of the housing 23 downwardly inside of the packer. A port 36 extends through the pipe 35 of the housing so that liquid may be forced into and removed from the chamber 31 inside of the packer whereby the packer may be infiated and deflated as desired. The packer is made up of a resilient packing sleeve 39,' which is of rubber or other suitable material and may be reenforced with fabric or wire as desired. 'I'his sleeve is preferably molded in place about the outstanding flanges 40 on the head 33 so that it will be securely anchored thereto in order to withstand the tremendous pressures which will be encountered. Reenforcing wires 4I may also be embedded in the end of the packing sleeve as it is afllxed so as to secure it to the head 33. 'I'he head 33 has a skirt 42 which overlies a portion of the end of the packing sleeve 39 so as to protect it and assist in maintaining a seal between the packing sleeve and the head to prevent leakage.

This skirt also prevents undue distortion of the resilient material of the packing sleeve and protects the same while it is being manipulated in the well bore.

Fig. 8 shows a passage 38 thru the head 33 which is closed by a plug 38'. Liquid may be introduced thru the passage as bled so as to be positive that the packers to also prevent or other liquid from the well bore.

The lower end of the packer 34 is best seen at no air or gas is in the tool is assemthe entry of m'ud the top of Fig. 3 and the packing sleeve 39 isshown as having its lower end affixed to a head 44, which is quite similar to the head 33 previously described in that it has the anges 40 to which the packing sleeve is anchored, and it has.

sembly is arranged so that the resilient packingsleeve 39 may contract longitudinally as thei pressure is applied in thechamber 3I to eiect its ination but is stopped by a plate 48. n

'I'he housing 23 continuesbelow. the pistonl 46 by having the nipple 50 secured to the piston. This nipple has the openings 5I -therein which are arranged as discharge port's if. the tool is to be' used for treating or cementing, andas entry ports when it is used as a testing tool. The lower packer 53 is fixed to a coupling 64 connected to the nipple 60 and it is not believed .necessary to describe the packer 53 because it .is identical in all respects with the packer 3'4. 'Its operation is the same and it is inflated by forcing liquid through the openings in the housing pipe 56, which extends below the coupling 54.

The housing continues with a. 'tail pipe 51 which carries a foot piece 58. This foot piece is enlarged to substantially the collapsed diameter of the packers so as to insure` that the bore -will be opened as the tool is lowered.

Attention is directed to the fact that the housing 23 is rigid from the top of the .tool tothe foot piece and that the packers' can contract re1- ative to the housing as to one end thereof.

Inside of the housing is a stem which is a continuation of the pipe 3, as seen in the upper end of Fig. 2.- This s tem has a head 6I lto provide a shoulder against which a spring -62 is'. arranged.-

This spring seats on a shoulder 63 in the lower end of the pipe 2l which is a part of the housing. This spring, therefore, normally urges the housing downwardly relative to the stem where the tool is being supported by the pipe 3. This normal position of the stem 60 relative to the housing 23 is seen in Figs. 2F and 3, and will be the position in which the parts are lowered into the well bore. In this position the tool is entirely closed.

The tool embodies a plurality of series of openings where part of each series of openings are in the housing and part are in the stem so that these openings may be aligned or misaligned, as the tool is manipulated to perform the operations thereof.

When the parts are in their normal position as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the ports 36 in the upper packer and the ports 55 in the lower packer will be aligned with the ports 65 in the stem 60 in the upper packer and the ports 66 in the stem in the lower packer respectively. In this manner liquid forced downwardly through the stem 60 will pass through the aligned ports into the packers 34 and 53. In this manner the pressure on the inside and the outside of the packers may be equalized, if desired, as the packers are lowered into the well. This is usually accomplished by adding liquid to the inside of the pipe 3 as the pipe sections are added in the lowering of the tool into the well bore. When the tool arrives at the desired elevation the liquid pressure which is to be utilized to inflate the -packers can be applied through the pipe 3 so that it will enter the chambers 31 in the packers.

Any desired pressure may be applied to these packers as they are designed of anextraordinary sturdy construction so as to vwithstand pressures up to ten thousand pounds per square inch and more if desired; also temperatures above 200 F. Recent tests have been made on one of these packers in excess of any pressure subjected in a well bore with perfect results. One of themost important features of the invention is the design 'for the construction of a hydraulically inflated vpacker capable of withstanding pressures up to fifteen thousand pounds per square inch and temperatures in excess of boiling point.

As soon as the packers are inated it will of course anchor the housing 23 in the well bore because of the fact that the outer surface of the packing sleeve 39 moves into engagement with the face of the formation, as best seen in Fig. 1l. Fig. 4 shows the next position of the tance so as to move tool wherein the upper packer 34 is shown as having been inflated and sealed against the for- Imation. When this has been accomplished the is lowered slightly a predetermined disthe ports or openings 66 in the pipe 61 of the upper end of the steml 60 into alignment with the ports 3| in the nipple 3|) of the housing. By comparison of Figs. 2 and 4 it will be apparent that the inside stem has been moved downwardly from the position in Fig. 2 to the position in Fig. 4, This may be accomplished by removing the blocks 1, which are shown in Fig. 10, and inserting blocks of a lesser pipe 3 length which allow the flange 5 to move down the required distance to align the ports 3| and 66. When the ports 3| and 66 are thus aligned the inside of the pipe 3 is opened into the well bore at 68 above the tool I5. In this manner any settlings may be washed away from the top of the tool or other liquid may be circulated into the well bore to replace the heavy drilling mud which may have been in the well bore, or the drilling mud may be thinned so as to remove the possibility of gelling or sticking the pipe 3. The circulation may also be used to drive out drilling mud or cement or to prepare the formation for acid treatment. While no well casing has been shown it is to be understood that the tool may be used in a casing or uncased bore hole.

The next operation is to lower the pipe 3 an additional amount, so as to bring the openings 10 in the well portion of the stem 60 into alignment with the openings or ports 5| in the nipple 50, which is seen between the packers in Fig. 3. The alignment of the ports 10 and 5| serves to open the tool as seen in the upper end of Fig. 6. This opens the tool to the porous formation I6, which is to be tested if the tool is beingused as a testing tool. If there is any pressure in the formation which is sealed off by the upper and lower packers the opening of the tool will admit any fluid from the formation if there is a predominant pressure in the formation as compared with the weight of the column of liquid inside of the pipe 3. The operator may observe from the surface whether there is a flow into the tool when it is opened by the sense of feel at the open upper end of the pipe 3, or in some instances, a cloth is laid over the pipe to see whether there is a discharge of air from the pipe, showing that there is an inflow at the formation. If there is no inflow into the tool it may be desirable to run a swab or bailelinto the pipe 3 either to reduce the pressure .at the openings to the formation or to create a suction to draw uid from the formation into the tool. On the other hand, if the tool is to be used as a treating or cementing tool the material to be forced into the formation can be pumped downwardly through the pipe 3 and discharged through the aligned ports 10 and 5| into the formation. It should be kept in mind that during all of this time the ports into the packers have been closed and the packers are sealedin inated position to maintain a seal with the walls of the bore.

When the desired treating and testing has been accomplished the pipe 3 may be elevated if desired to either trap the sample which has been obtained from the formation or to shut off the rate of flow of the material which has been discharged from the tool. This closing operation is accomplished by moving the ports 1U out of alignment with the ports 5| and is preferably accomplished by raising the tool from the position of Fig. 6 back to some intermediate position such as shown in Fig. 4 or Fig. 2. If the packers are not to be deflated or released, however, the tool should not be moved back to the position of Fig. 2, because when the open ings 36 and 65 of the packers are moved into alignment the liquid is released from the packers. In some instances it may be desirable to hold the tool in set position even after it has been closed so as to maintain a squeeze pressure on the formation which has been treated.

The lower end of the tool as seen in Figs. 3. 6 and 'l carries a construction by which the tool can be opened or closed relative to that area beneath the lower packer 53. This construction embodies a pipe 15 which is a part of 'the stem and is slidable, of course, in the pipe 51 which forms the lower portion of the housing.

This pipe 15 has the openings 'I6 therein which are arranged to be aligned or misaligned with the openings 11 in the housing. Fig. 3

shows these openings as being aligned when the assembly is in its normal position being lowered into the well bore because of the fact that it maybe desirable to circulate liquid from within the pipe 3 outwardly beneath the packers if the packers should become lodged or sealed in the well bore after they have been deflated.

In order therefore to maintain this lower series of openings closed until it is desirable to open them. a sleeve 80 is shown as slidably arranged inside of the stem portion 15 and sultable sealing rings 8| are arranged to maintain a seal between these two slidable parts. In Fig. 3 the sleeve l0 is shown as overlying the ports 16 and 11 so as to insure that they will be closed.

When the stem 60 is moved downwardly to manipulate the other series of openings to obtain circulation or operation of the tool, oi course, the inside ports 18 move out of alignment with the ports 11, as seen in the lower end of Fig. 6. When this occurs, of course, the lower end of Fig. 6. When this occurs, of course, the lower end of the tool remains closed. An upstanding stud 83, however, is shown on the foot piece 58 and this stud is arranged to engage the sleeve 80 and hold it against downward movement as the stem portion 15 moves down. In this manner the sleeve 80 is held stationary while the stem moves down around it, so that the sleeve is moved to a higher position inside of the stem. This operation is performed so that when the stem is raised to close the tool to the formation being tested or treated, then the sleeve 8|! will be moved upwardly with the stem so that the parts assume the position of Fig. 7, wherein the sleeve 80 is shown as above the elevation of the ports 16 and 11 which have again moved into 40 alignment. This alignment of the ports opens the inside of the tool to the chamber 85 in the well bore beneath the packers. The pressure is thus equalized and it is readily possible to remove the tool from the formation. If for some 45 reason the packer should remain engaged with the wall of the formation any desired pressure can now be applied through the pipe 3, so as to pump the tool from its position in the well bore, if desired.

50 If for some reason it is desired that the sleeve 80 be moved downwardly again to cover the ports 15 and 16 if the tool is to be re-used, at a different elevation or for any other reason you desire to close the bottom of the tool, a suitable 55 weight or other member may be lowered on wire line or dropped downwardly from the surface through the pipe 3 to strike the sleeve 80 and return it to the position shown in Fig. 3. In this manner the tool is completely re-set and 60 may be used repeatedly in the well bore without removal to the surface. The ball or object dropped or lowered may or may not form a seal with the top of the sleeve 80 or may be removed as desired.

05 Broadly the invention contemplates a combination testing and treating tool which may be manipulated in the well bore to set the packers hydraulically to hold them inflated and to thereafter open or close the tool and obtain circulation or release of the tool as desired.

What is claimed is: l. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon,

a pair oi spaced packers on said housing, a stem 75 slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem. and a plurality of series oi' openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing.

2. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon, a pair of spaced packers on said\houslng, a stem slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem, and a plurality of series of openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing, one series of openings being above said packers to permit circulation in the well bore above the packers.

3. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe. a housing thereon, a pair of spaced packers on said housing, a stem slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem, and a plurality of series of openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing, one series of openings being between said packers to discharge or admit fluid'.

4. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon, a pair of spaced packers on said housing, a stem slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem, and a plurality of series of openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing, one series of openings being below said packers to discharge or receive fluid.

5. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon, a pair of spaced packers on said housing, a stern slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem, and a plurality of series of openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing, the openings of each Vseries being normally spaced a different distance apart than any of the other series so that a predetermined movement will eiIect opening of a predetermined series of openings.

6. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon, a pair of spaced packers on said housing, a stem slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem, and a plurality of series of openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing, the openings of each series being normally spaced a different distance apart than any of the other series so that a predetermined movement will effect opening of a predetermined series oi' openings. and means at the well head to set the amount of movement.

7. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon. a pair of spaced packers on said housing. a stem slidable in said housing,spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem, and a plurality of series of openings in said stem and housing adapted to be aligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing, one oi' said series being above the packers, one between the packers and one below the packers. Y

8. A well formation testing and treating tool including an operating pipe, a housing thereon, a pair of spaced packers on said housing, a stem slidable in said housing, spring means normally holding said stem in an elevated position, a sliding connection between said pipe and housing so that said pipe may be lowered into the housing to move said stem. and a plurality of series of openings in said stem. and housing normally aligned but adapted to be misaligned upon sliding of said stem relative to said housing.

9. A well formation testing and treating tool of the character described comprising a housing, a packer thereon to be hydraulically expanded. a pipe connected to said housing, a stem slidable in the housing by said pipe, and an opening thru said housing and stem to said packer for liquid to inflate said packer, said opening being capable of misalignment upon movement of said stem relative to said housing by said pipe.

10. A well formation testing and treating tool of the character described comprising a housing. a packer thereon to be hydraulically expanded, a pipe connected to said housing, a stem slidable in the housing by said pipe, an opening thru said housing and stem to said packer for liquid to inflate said packer, said opening being capable of misalignment upon movement of said stem relative to said housing by said pipe, and a plurality of series of other openings thru said stem and housing which are normally misaligned but capatble of alignment upon the movement of said s em.

11. A well formation testing and treating tool of the character described comprising a housing, a packer thereon to be hydraulically expanded, a pipe connected to said housing, a stem slidable in the housing by said pipe, an opening thru said housing and stem to said packer for liquid to inflate -said packer, said opening being capable of misalignment upon movement of said stem relative to said housing by said pipe, and a plurality of series of other openings thru said stem and housing which are normally misaligned but capable of alignment upon the movement of said stem, so that when said packer is iniiated and sealed in position by closing thereof and whereby the inside of said stem may be opened to receive or to discharge iiuid relative to the formation.

12. A formation and treating tool for wells including a housing, a hydraulic packer thereon having upper and lower heads mounted on said housing, an entry into the packer thru said housing for liquid under pressure to innate said packer, a resilient packing sleeve anchored to said heads, one of said heads being slidable on said housing in response to inflation of the sleeve to permit expansion of said sleeve. Y

13. A formation and treating tool forwells including a housing. a hydraulic packer thereon having upper and lower heads mounted on said housing, an entry into the packer thru said housing for liquid under pressure to inflate said packer, a resilient packing sleeve anchored to said heads, one* of said heads being slidable on said housing in response to inflation of the sleeve to permit expansion of said sleeve, each of said heads including an annular barrel portion having outstanding flanges upon which said sleeve is molded.

14. A formation andtreating tool for wells including a housing, a hydraulic packer thereon having upper and lower heads mounted on said housing, an entry into the packer thru said housing for liquid under pressure to inflate said packer, a resilient packing sleeve anchored to said heads, one of said heads being slidable on said housing in response to inflation of the sleeve to permit expansion of said sleeve, each of said heads including an annular barrel portion having outstanding flanges upon which said sleeve is molded, and a protective skirt overlying the end of said sleeve.

15. A formation and treating tool for wells including a housing, a hydraulic packer thereon having upper and lower heads mounted on said housing, an entry into the packer thru said housing for liquid under pressure to inflate said packer, a resilient packing sleeve anchored to said heads, one of said heads being slidable on said housing in response to inflation of the sleeve to permit expansion of said sleeve, each of said heads including an annular barrel portion having outstanding flanges upon which said sleeve is molded. arrprotective skirt overlying the end of said sleeve, and a stop member on said slidable head to limit the contraction of said sleeve.

16. An assembly for testing or treating well formations including a string of pipe to be lowered into the well bore, a rotatable support therefor at the surface, a flange on said pipe above said support, a plurality of members of diierent lengths to be positioned on said support to receive said flange so as to move and set said ange different distances from said support, and a testing and treating tool carried by said pipe having a plurality of series of openings to 'be aligned or misaligned in the operation of said tool by the movement of said pipe whereby the tool may be set, opened to receive or discharge liquid, or closed to retain fluid from the formation.

17. An assembly for testing or treating Well formations including a string of pipe to be lowered into the well bore, a rotatable support therefor at the surface, a flange on said pipe above said support. a plurality of members of different lengths in be positioned on said support to receive said flange so as to move and set said flange different distances from said support, a testing and treating tool carried by said pipe having a purality of series of openings to be aligned or misaligned in the operation of said tool by the movement of said pipe whereby the tool may be set, opened to receive or discharge liquid, or closed to retain fluid from the formation, and a rotatable connection in said pipe adjacent said tool so that the pipe may be rotated while the tool is set. Y

18. A method of testing or treating formations penetrated by a well bore filled with liquid which comprises lowering an assembly into the bore to the desired elevation, applying a liquid under pressure to the assembly so as to form a pair of spaced seals with the wall of the well bore to isolate a section of the bore between the seals.-

i tion oi liquid either above or below the seals while maintaining the seals, closingr the tool after such circulation. opening the tool for entry or discharge of fluid from or to the space between the seals closing the tool to exclude liquid which has been discharged or to retain the uuid which has entered. deilatina the seals to release the tool and either resetting or removing the tool from the well, all of said manipulating operations being accomplished by relative longitudinal sliding movement of parts of the assembly.

JOHN LYNES.

DISCLAIMER 2,227,731r-JohnvLynes, Houston, Tex. WELL FORMATION TESTING AND TREATING TooL. Patent dated January 7, 1941. Disclaimer filed July .8, 1942, by the inventor. Hereby enters this disclaimer to claim 12 in said specification.

[Official Gazette August 25, 1.942.]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458631 *Mar 30, 1944Jan 11, 1949Parks Asbury SDrill stem tester
US2516580 *Jul 3, 1944Jul 25, 1950Lynes IncFormation testing tool
US2516581 *Nov 24, 1944Jul 25, 1950Lynes IncWell tool
US2611437 *Dec 17, 1948Sep 23, 1952Lynes IncHigh pressure inflatable packer
US2630864 *Oct 19, 1944Mar 10, 1953Lynes IncWell formation tool
US2637400 *Apr 15, 1946May 5, 1953Brown Luther EWell tester
US2643722 *Feb 26, 1948Jun 30, 1953Lynes IncHydraulically inflatable packer
US2643723 *Dec 11, 1947Jun 30, 1953Lynes IncOil well tool
US2646127 *Feb 1, 1947Jul 21, 1953Breukelman Christian WWell formation testing tool
US2667927 *Aug 28, 1951Feb 2, 1954Johnston Mordica OValve for well testing tools
US2671509 *Aug 28, 1951Mar 9, 1954Johnston Mordica OWell testing apparatus
US2715444 *Mar 17, 1950Aug 16, 1955Halliburton Oil Well CementingHydraulic packers
US2738013 *Sep 5, 1952Mar 13, 1956Oil Recovery CorpOil well tool
US2738018 *Mar 12, 1953Mar 13, 1956Oil Recovery CorpOil well treating and production tool
US2760580 *Feb 12, 1954Aug 28, 1956Edgar C Johnston JrSide wall tester
US2796938 *Apr 1, 1953Jun 25, 1957Lynes IncTool for treating, testing, and servicing wells
US2823754 *Aug 12, 1954Feb 18, 1958Socony Mobil Oil Co IncWell packer
US2824612 *Mar 24, 1954Feb 25, 1958Lynes IncMeans for isolating, treating, and testing a section of well formation
US2831541 *Aug 13, 1953Apr 22, 1958Lynes IncHydraulic packer tool
US2831542 *Jan 19, 1953Apr 22, 1958Lynes IncLocking assembly for treating and testing tools
US2845130 *Aug 19, 1952Jul 29, 1958Baker Oil Tools IncApparatus for bridging and cementing well casing
US2870846 *Sep 25, 1956Jan 27, 1959Fennon F MooreFormation test tool packer setting tool
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/264, 166/147, 166/152, 166/290, 166/150, 166/305.1, 166/187
International ClassificationE21B49/00, E21B49/08
Cooperative ClassificationE21B49/081
European ClassificationE21B49/08B