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Publication numberUS2228493 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 14, 1941
Filing dateNov 21, 1939
Priority dateNov 21, 1939
Publication numberUS 2228493 A, US 2228493A, US-A-2228493, US2228493 A, US2228493A
InventorsWill Ilah
Original AssigneeWill Ilah
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pencil box
US 2228493 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 14, 1941. I. WILL 2,228,493

PENCIL BOX Filed Nov. 21, 1939.

Patented Jan. 14, 1941- UNITED sTATEs PATENT OFFICE 12 Claims.

This invention relates generally to receptacles or holders, and more particularly to what are known as pencil boxes.

Heretofore pencil boxes have generallybeen constructed from such materials as wood, cardboard, metal and the like, and it is seldom that provision is made for retaining the pencils and other items therewithin. Boxes of this character are usually poorly constructed, and after being subjected to regular use for a short time, the joints connecting the parts comprising the box become loose, separate, and break. Also, it is practically impossible to use such boxes without making some noise and this is particularly true when the box is accidentally dropped and its contents scatter in all directions. This is most disturbing to the decorum of a class room, and is not conducive to efllcient school work.

One particular object of this invention is to provide a pencil box which avoids all of the disadvantages above referred to, by constructing the box from a suitable material like sponge rubber or the equivalent.

Another object is to provide improved means whereby to detachably retain pencils and other items placed in the box, whereby to prevent rattling of the items when the box is closed, and the possibility of spilling when opened and dropped.

A further object is to provide a durable box which may be economically manufactured on a commercial scale.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will appear after considering the drawing annexed hereto in conjunction with the following description.

In the drawing, Figure l is a relatively small perspective view of the box embodying my inven tion;

Figure 2 is a top view of the box in open position, showing various details and preferred location or arrangement of the items adapted to be contained therein; Figure 3 is a transverse sectional view taken substantially on line 3-3 of Figure 2 through the lower section or half of the box and part of the upper section;

Figure 4 is a partial section taken through certain portions, assuming the box is closed, the upper and-lower sections thereof being detachably secured together by snap connections;

Figure 5 is a partial enlarged view of a section taken substantially on line 5-5 of Figure 2, showing the act of inserting a pencil into a recess;

Figure 6 is a section taken substantially on line H of Figure 2 showing one of several ways to til'etain an object such as an eraser in the box, an

Figure 7 is a section taken through one of the snap connections preferably employed in hold- 5 ing the box in closed position.

The box when closed as shown in Figure 1 is preferably made to assume a size of approximatev 7 /2" X x 11", but of course may be made in other convenient sizes. Obviously, the box may also be made round, oval, or some otherdesirable geometrical form. In other words, the size and shape of the box are immaterial insofar. as this invention is concerned.

Considering the construction, numerals l and 15 2 indicate the upper and lower sections, respectively, of the box, which are preferably constructed of some desirable material such as relatively firm sponge rubber, or the equivalent. It is very possible that a material somewhat similar to the product known as Celotex might, under certain conditions, be used to good advantage. However, sponge rubber is preferred, the sections, if possible, being moulded in one operation.

The sections may be connected together adjacent their back marginal sides or edges by any suitable means, for example a flexible hinge 3 which extends substantially the full length of the back, in order to more fully insure a good substantial and durable connection, and also one which lends itself to direct or guide the sections into matching relation when the box is being closed. The connection 3, which is in the form of a rectangular strip, is preferably moulded into the sections so that the side portions of the strip extend angularly inwardly. This angular disposition of portions of the strip also acts to reinforce the back of the box.

In order to further reinforce the box generally,

a substantially flat reinforcing member 4, pref- 40 erably constructed of cardboard, or the equivalent is preferably moulded into each of the sections, as shown. These members are preferably of a size to extend or underlie the items in each section, as shown in Figure 3, so as to reinforce or impart stability 'to the sections, particularly adjacent the recesses and pockets adapted to receive the pencils, erasers and other accessories. The marginal edges of the members 4 are inset with respect to the marginal edges of the sections.

The sections I and 2 are preferably recessed at 5 to provide a convex bead 6 bounding each section whereby to provide cushions or pads which protect the box from injury when it accia plurality of longitudinally extending spaced apart recesses, including recesses I and l, which are preferably inset with respect to said surface. Each recess has an entrance slot I of a width less than the width of each recess; and the slots, are formed by the spaced apart portions ll of the sections which extend partially over the recesses. The said portions II, in effect, provide resilient flaps which are distorted inwardly, when an article such as the pencil ll shown in Figure 5, is being inserted into the recess, and when the pencil becomes substantially seated, the flaps fly outwardly to their normal positions shown in Figure 3. Thus, items such as pencils may be easily and quickly snapped into the recesses. It should also be apparent that more rigidity is imparted to the box when filled with pencils. Since the flaps are under tension during the insertion of the pencil, the flaps also act to more or less force and snap the pencil into engagement with the bottom wall of the recess. This tension is producedby compression of the flaps, as well as by the expansion of the recess as clearly shown in Figure 5. More specifically, each recess includes a curved bottom wall, parallel side walls, and an upper two part wall arranged substantially transverse to the side walls, formedby the flaps l0.

To facilitate easy and quick removal of the pencil and other items within the recesses, the said planar surface of section 2 is preferably. provided with a plurality of spaced grooves or channels i2, which are arranged transversely to and intersect the various recesses such as 'l and 8. The grooves are of a depth substantially equivalent to the depth of the recesses, so that the pencils and other items may be easily reached and removed from the recesses. In effect the grooves provide finger openings. The spacing of the grooves is such that at least two short pencils may be removed from a single recess, said pencils being accessible from the two grooves. Obviously the recesses may be designed to receive pencils and a penholder as shown, or other items.

As clearly shown in Figure 2, a relatively large recess I3 is provided near the back of section 2, and'the ends of this recess are provided with flaps M which function similar to the flaps above referred to, and retain the ruler IS in place. The grooves l2 above referred to, also intersect the recess i3 to permit easy access and removal of the ruler. Placing the ruler as shown has a tendency to reinforce the hinged connection.

A transverse recess 16 is also provided in section 2, preferably across one end for receiving an eraser H, which is detachably held in place by side flaps l8. Finger openings l9 are formed adjacent the ends of the recess to facilitate removal of the eraser.

Moreover, section 2 is provided with a recess 20, which is preferably undercut to resilientlyretain such items as the pens 2|. Still further, and as shown in Figures 1 and 2, preferably one end of the section is provided with a pocket 22, which is adapted to receive shears shown by the dotted lines in Figure 2.

Referring now to the upper section I, which corresponds substantially in shape and size to section 2, it is apparent that the inner planar surface of section I is also provided with a plurality of spaced apart parallel recesses 23, which substantially correspond to the recesses above referred to. Said recesses are preferably arranged transversely to the longitudinal axis of the section, and a longitudinally extending finger groove 24 intersects the recesses. These recesses may be formed and arranged as desired, or as described above, but as shown each recess is made to accommodate at least one crayon, and preferably two. The length of the recesses and the location of the groove are such that a crayon is adapted to be fitted into the recess on either side of the groove 24. As a consequence, the crayons may be removed by grasping at least one end of each through the groove. A suflicient number of recesses are preferably provided so as to accommodate at least crayons of standard colors.

Section I may also be provided with a pocket 25 adjacent one extremity, similar to the pocket 22 above referred to, whereby to accommodate some desirable item as a small scratch pad.

Any desirable means may be employed to secure the sections together in superimposed relation, but as herein shown, particularly in Figures 4 and 7, a pair of snap connections are used.

Since each connection is the same, a description of one is deemed sufli'cient. member 26 is moulded into the section 2, and a similar member 21, adapted to cooperate with member. 26, is moulded in section I. As shown, each member projects through a reinforcement 4, and is secured thereto by clamping flanges 28 formed on the member. The member 28 is provided with a resilient receptacle 29 which is adapted to receive and resiliently retain the pro jection end 30 formed on member 21.

Accordingly, it is apparent that I have provided improved principles of design and construction with respect to article holding devices. In this connection, it is to be understood that various slight changes might be made in the general form and arrangement of parts described without departing from my invention, and hence I do not limit myself to the precise details set forth, but consider myself at liberty to make such changes and alterations as fairly fall within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Also, it is to be understood that no limitation is to be placed on the word box as it appears in this specification, as such word is intended to include a container, holder, receptacle and the like.

I claim:

1. A box constructed of sponge rubber or the equivalent, including a pair of sections hingedly connected along one side, recesses provided at least in one section for receiving such items as pencils, the material adjacent said recesses providing means for resiliently retaining the items in place, and means underlying said recesses imparting stability to said section particularly to the material about said recesses.

2. A box constructed of sponge rubber or the equivalent, including a pair of sections hingedly connected along one side, recesses provided at least in one section for receiving such items as pencils. the material adjacent said recesses providing means for resiliently retaining the items in place, means underlying said recesses imparting stability to said section particularly to the material about said recesses, and means providing cushions for said sections.

A tubular metal 3. A box constructed of sponge rubber or the equivalent, including a pair of sections hingedly connected together adjacent one side, recesses provided at least in one section for receiving such items as pencils, the material adjacent said recesses providing means for resiliently retaining the items in place, a pocket extending inwardly from at least one side of one of-said sections, and means underlying said recesses and said pocket imparting stability to the material adjacent same.

4. A box constructed of sponge rubber or the equivalent, including a pair of sections hingedly connected together adjacent one side, recesses provided at least in one section for receiving such items as pencils, the material adjacent said recesses providing means for resiliently retaining the items in place, a pocket extending inwardly from at least one side'of one of said sections, means underlying said recesses and said pocket imparting stability to the sections, and means bounding said sections providing cushions therefor.

5. A resilient body, an elongated recess provided in said body in spaced apart relation to a surface thereof for receiving and supporting an article substantially throughout its entire length, and relatively rigid means within said body adjacent said recess imparting stability to the body adjacent said recess.

6. A box constructed of resilient material, including a plurality of sections cooperatively connected together, a recess provided at least in one section for receiving an item, the material adjacent said recess providing means for retaining the item in place, and means underlying said recess imparting stability to said section particularly to the material adjacent said recess.

'7. A box constructed of resilient material, including a pair of sections operatively connected together, a recess provided at least in one section for receiving an item, the material adjacent said recess providing means for retaining said item in place, means associated with said recess imparting stability to said section particularly to the material adjacent said recess, and rib means providing a cushion for at least one of said sections.

8. A box constructed of resilient material, including a plurality of complementary sections operatively connected together, a recess provided at least in one section for receiving an item, the material adjacent said recess providing means for retaining said item in place, a pocket provided at least in one of said sections, means arranged in close proximity to said pocket imparting stability to the material adjacent said recess, and integral projection means provided adjacent the lower extremity of one of said sections providing a cushion for said box.

9. A box constructed of resilient material, including a plurality of complementary sections operatively connected together along one side, a recess provided in each of said sections for receiving an item, the material adjacent said recess providing means for retaining the items in place, a pocket extending ,inwardiy from at least one side of one of said sections, reinforcing means underlying said recesses impartingstability to said sections, and snap connection means for said sections anchored to said reinforcing means.

10. A resilient body, an elongated recess provided in said body in spaced relation to a planar surface thereof, a relatively narrow slot intersecting said surface and said recess, means imparting stability to the material adjacent said recess,

and a recess provided in one face of said body. acting as a vacuum cup to hold the body to a support.

11. A resilient body, an elongated recess provided in said body in spaced relation to. a planar surface thereof, a relatively narrow slot intersecting said surface and said recess, means imparting stability to the material adjacent said recess, and means projecting outwardly fr0m the 'bottom. lower edges of said bodyproviding a cushion for said body.

12. A box constructed of resilient material,

IILAHWILL.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/214, 206/223, 24/10.00R, 206/804, 206/564, 206/815, 217/25.5, 206/523
International ClassificationA45C11/34
Cooperative ClassificationA45C11/34, Y10S206/804, Y10S206/815
European ClassificationA45C11/34