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Publication numberUS2229935 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1941
Filing dateJan 31, 1940
Priority dateJan 31, 1940
Publication numberUS 2229935 A, US 2229935A, US-A-2229935, US2229935 A, US2229935A
InventorsPowers David W
Original AssigneeFrank M Powers, Thomas C Powers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rope adjuster
US 2229935 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 28, 1941. u PO RS 2,229,935

ROPE ADJUSTER Filed Jan. 31, 1940 Patented Jan. 28, 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT FFiE ROPE. ADJUSTER to Frank M. Powers Application January 31, 1940, Serial No. 316,655

1 Claim.

This invention relates to improvements in rope adjusters and more especially such a device commonly used in connection with adjusting the guy rope of a tent and commonly referred to as a slide or tent key.

Among the features of my invention is the provision of such a device that has an increased efficiency over the conventional type. My improved device also can be easily and cheaply made; and is simple to operate.

In those forms of device embodying the features of my invention shown in the accompanying drawing, Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation, Fig. 2 is a similar view showing a modified form,

' Fig. 3 is a similar view showing another modification, and Fig. is a view showing the device in use.

As shown in the drawing the improved rope adjuster may be made of sheet metal, wood, plastic, or any other suitable material. The device of Fig. 3 is made of wire and is the form preferred by me at present. This form is very cheap to manufacture.

The device comprises primarily a rigid elongated member with means for attaching a rope to one end thereof. The other end has means to engage and kink the rope to prevent it from sliding. To this extent the device resembles the conventional rope adjuster. The particular feature of my invention is the provision of a second rope-engaging and kinking means intermediate the ends of the device. As here shown in the preferred forms this is an open loop into which the rope may readily be inserted. It will be seen from the drawing that one or both of the ropeengaging and kinking means may be open loops. It is just as obvious that they may both be closed in which case the rope would have to be threaded through and remain there. At present I prefer to make the end loop closed to form an eye and the other one open as shown in the device of Fig.

3 which is made of wire.

In ordinary operation where the extra loop is open the adjuster is operated the same as the conventional one and then the rope is kinked and snapped through the extra loop to give additional security. In other words, the adjuster is manipulated in the same manner as the conventional type until the rope is the desired length. The rope is then given a slight kink and snapped into the extra loop.

It will not be necessary to describe each of the devices separately since the construction and operation of all is similar. The elongated member itself is indicated by I 0 and the modifications are similarly indicated by H0 and 2H). II, III and 2H indicate the means for attaching a rope to one end, here shown as a closed eye through which the end of the rope 50 can be inserted and knotted in the usual manner as indicated by 50 The conventional means at the other end of the device for engaging and kinking the rope is indicated by 12, H2 and H2. I2 is a closed eye, H2 an open loop and M2 a closed eye. The additional means intermediate the ends of the device for engaging and kinking the rope is indicated by It, H3 and 2l3. In each case this is shown as an open loop although it is obvious that this loop also could be closed to form an eye. With such a device however the rope would have to remain permanently threaded through the eye and manipulation of the device would not be quite so simple.

It will be seen that the device of Fig. 3 which is made of wire can be very cheaply manufactured. The wire is bent so that the two eyes and open loop are substantially in alignment.

In all cases where the loops are open, the opening is preferably somewhat smaller than the diameter of the loop so that the rope will be more securely engaged and held.

While I have shown and described certain embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that it is capable of many modifications. Changes, therefore, in the construction and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as disclosed in the appended claim, in which it is my intention to claim all novelty inherent in my invention as broadly as permissible, in view of the prior art.

.What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

A device of the character described, comprising one integral piece of wire with a closed eye at each end and an open loop substantially midway between the ends, said eyes and, open loop lying substantially in alignment and substantially in the same plane, the portions of the wire joining the open loop with the eyes being substantially straight.

DAVID W. POWERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2653719 *May 5, 1950Sep 29, 1953Field John GSupplementary clothesline
US3003816 *Sep 27, 1957Oct 10, 1961Sturgis Posture Chair CoTightener apparatus for removable cover of chair back or chair seat and the like
US3181481 *Aug 14, 1963May 4, 1965Frank TaylorCover assembly for open type vehicles
US3714923 *Apr 12, 1971Feb 6, 1973Mariani LDepth marker for a fish line
US3860157 *Jul 31, 1972Jan 14, 1975Douglas E HallBack pack and frame
US4881342 *Jan 19, 1988Nov 21, 1989Ferguson George WPlant support device and display stand therefor
US5210973 *May 7, 1991May 18, 1993University Of HawaiiTrellis clip
US6301830 *Nov 16, 1999Oct 16, 2001Gaylord C. WhippleGuy line system
US6330949 *Mar 26, 1999Dec 18, 2001Derisio David T.Hanger storage system
US6901614May 30, 2003Jun 7, 2005The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with clasp for facilitating rolling
US6964072Aug 27, 2004Nov 15, 2005The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with clasp for facilitating rolling
US6968600May 20, 2003Nov 29, 2005Aerial Machine & Tool CorporationDevice and method for attaching a connection fitting to a cable during airborne rescue operations
US6983498 *Mar 1, 2004Jan 10, 2006The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with cinching mechanism
US7213278Nov 8, 2005May 8, 2007The Coleman Company, Inc.Method of storing a sleeping bag with a clinching mechanism
US8261460Sep 11, 2012Linovation Corp.Line holders for masonry work and the like
US8661624 *Feb 22, 2012Mar 4, 2014Mark C BracewellPortable and modular cleat with multiple anchoring capability
US20040231112 *May 20, 2003Nov 25, 2004Aerial Machine & Tool CorporationDevice and method for attaching a connection fitting to a cable during airborne rescue operations
US20040237192 *May 30, 2003Dec 2, 2004The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with clasp for facilitating rolling
US20050028276 *Aug 27, 2004Feb 10, 2005The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with clasp for facilitating rolling
US20050188461 *Mar 1, 2004Sep 1, 2005The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with cinching mechanism
US20060005670 *Jul 6, 2005Jan 12, 2006Ki-Joo KimLength adjustment device of lamp connection wire
US20060053552 *Nov 8, 2005Mar 16, 2006The Coleman Company, Inc.Sleeping bag with cinching mechanism
US20090019889 *Jul 18, 2007Jan 22, 2009Kymberly Ann SmithBracelets and methods of assembling such
US20130185846 *Dec 20, 2012Jul 25, 2013Denise BauerArticle for straps of clothing items
US20140196256 *Jan 10, 2014Jul 17, 2014Brent A. GarciaCord tensioning and securing device
USD639683Jun 14, 2011Linovation Corp. (Ohio Corp.)Mason's guide line holders or similar articles
USD639684Jun 14, 2011Linovation Corp. (Ohio Corp.)Mason's guide line holders or similar articles
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/131.00R, 47/44, 24/129.00B, D08/44, 47/46
International ClassificationE04H15/32
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/322
European ClassificationE04H15/32B