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Publication numberUS2230088 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1941
Filing dateOct 3, 1938
Priority dateOct 3, 1938
Publication numberUS 2230088 A, US 2230088A, US-A-2230088, US2230088 A, US2230088A
InventorsWalter J Podbielniak
Original AssigneeBenjamin B Schneider
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air conditioning method and apparatus
US 2230088 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 28, 19411. vw. J. PODBIELNIAK 9 3 AIR CONDITIONING METHOD AND KPPARATUS Filed 001:. 3, 1938 3 Sheets-Sheet l 70 JVYZ/GTK 071' 3811- 1 w. J. FODBEELNIAK AIR CONDITIONING METHOD AND APiARA'lUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 3. 1938 n 1941- w. JjPoDBlELNlAK 3 AIR CONDITIONING METHOD AND APPARATUS Filed Oct. 3, 1938 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Jan. 28, 1941 UNITED STATES AIR CONDITIONIIQG METHOD AND APPARATUS Walter- J. Podbielniak, Chicago, 11]., assignor to Benjamin B. Schneider, Chicago, Ill.

Application October 3, 1938, Serial No. 233,098

V I 14 Claims. This'invention' relates to air conditioning and more particularly to methods and apparatus for conditioning air wherein the unconditioned air is first dried or dehumidified, by causing it to flow inwardly in a rotating passageway of increasing radius and counter-currently to an outwardly centrifugally propelled hygroscopic liquid, and then rehydrated and cooled. The inventiton also comprehends the subsequent dehydration of the spent hygroscopic liquid and the return of the dehydrated hygroscopic liquid to the system for reuse.

This invention is also adapted for use in times of war as hereinafter fully set forth.

One of the air conditioning systems of the prior art, for example, the electric refrigeration unit, requires compressors, heat exchangers, cooling coils, large motors, etc., and is therefore relatively expensive. This unit requires large amounts of energy to chill the air to a temperature low enough to reduce the humidity by condensing out the excess moisture. Usually, .the air must be super-cooled and hence super-dried to a degree below the requirements of bodily comfort since the super-cooled andsuper-dried air is blended with untreated air to bring its temperature up to about 70 to 80 F. and its humidity to about 45% or 50% as required by consideration of bodily comfort. This need of large amounts of energy tov super-cool and effect condensation of the moisture in the air below the requirements of bodily comfort renders this unit inherently wasteful and inefiicient both from a theoretical and practical standpoint.

In another prior art air conditioning system, the absorption system, wherein operation is effected by heat energy in the form of gas 'or other fuel instead of electrical energy. the requirement of bulky cooling towers, refrigerating absorption unit, etc. renders this system expensive and unsuitable for many needs. f

In accordance with my present invention I have overcome the objections to the prior art air conditioning systems by providing, aclosed or cyclic system' which eliminates the need of refrigerating compressing or refrigerating absorption units, large motors, etc. and thereby avoids the waste and expense inherent in these prior art systems.

The apparatus embodying my invention, is simple in design and construction, compact and cheap and efficient in operation. y

In carrying out my invention, the air to be conditioned is first dried or dehumidified to reduce its relative humidity to as low as about 15 to 20% by urging it inwardly in a rotating path of increasing radius by a sustained applied force while propelling a hygroscopic solvent, such as lithium or calcium chloride or high molecular weight organic solvent such as glycerine, the glycol derivatives and the like, outwardly, by centrifugal force. and in counter-current contact with the air. By virtue of this process for dehydrating the air, the contact'between the air and solvent is so intimate and extendedin a counter flow relation that the heat of absorption 10 of the moisture extracted from the air is localized in the effluent solvent and is not imparted in any material degree to the eflluent dried air. The air so dried ls rehumidifled and chilled in the order of about 10 to 15 F. below its initial tem- 15 perature by flashing or evaporating into it sufliclent liquid water. The quantity of water added is controlled to raise the relative humidity of the dried air from about 15% to 20% to the desired '45 to 50%. By virtue of the evaporation of the 20 water in the dehumidifled air to raise the relative humidity thereof, the temperature of the air is lowered in the order stated. In this phase of the process, 1. e. drying or dehumidifying the air to be treated with a hygroscopic solvent and treating the dried air by a re-evaporative humidifying and chilling step, the operations are thermodynamically highly efficient. The hygroscopic solvent containing the moisture from the dehumidified air is dehydrated by means to be hereinafter described and is returned to the rotating path in a closed cycle for treatment of air as described. If the temperature drop of 15 to 20 F. is not sufiicient, it is, of course, possible to modify'the apparatus and process above outlined so that the effluent air is humidified to a degree higherf than or relative humidity, say M 7), thus causing a greater temperaturejd'rop thah 15 or, 20-F., the excess moisture above f45f-"5 0f%fi being then removed in another rotary'dehydrah" ing unit of, for example, the type already"tie scribed without appreciable superheatingof the cooled air. Or. if this extra step still isinsufli cient to bring about the required drop in temperature, it is possible to repeat the entire process, including both a thorough dehydration and rehumidification, thus making it a two-stage or three-stage or multiple-stage process as may be inost practical and desirable for a given applicaion.

For illustrative purposes, the invention is shown and will be described in connection with apparatus of moreor less specific details of construction, arrangement and location of parts,.and I as embodying in their modes ofoperation certain series and sequence of somewhat definite steps and operatingconditions; however, it will be understobd that many of the objects and advanteges of the invention may be obtained, to a greater or less extent, through the employment of apparatus of modified character Or,' in fact, through variations or, in some cases, omissions, of certain of the component steps or parts, with-= out departing from the spirit and scope of the invention,

Referring to the drawings:

Figure l is a diagrammatic view of an air conditioning assembly suitable for carrying my in= vention into effect;

Figure 2 is a diagrammatic view oi a modified form oi an air conditioning assembly suitable for carrying my inventioninto eiiect;

Figure 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the air a conditioning apparatus embodying my invention which is shown in diagrammatic "form in Figures 1 and 2;

Fig. 4 'is a transverse section through the air conditioning apparatus taken along the line 6-4 of Fig. 3; and

Fig. 5 is a similar view taken along the line 55 of Fig. 3:

Referring to Fig. 3, there is shown an air conditioning apparatus comprising an air dehumidifying .section III and an air rehumidifying and cooling section II. Sections I and II are contained within a stationary cylindrical housing l2 having one end cover plate |3 adjacent section It! and the other end plate It adjacent section l through which air to be conditionedis urged for treatment in section III. Plate H is in the form of a reticulated grill having openings l3 through which conditioned air from section II is urged for conditioning the surrounding space.

Air dehumidifying section In is housed within a portion of the housing l2 and the end plates l1 and I8. End plate I1 is provided with a central aperture defined by the upturned inner edge l9 through which the unconditioned air passes into the treating portion of section l0. The outer edge of plate I! is secured to and supported by the housing I2, and the inner upturned edge is secured to and supported by a stationary spider '20 which in turn is stationarily mounted on a rotating shaft 2|. End plate I8 is secured at'its outer edge to housing l2 and its free inner edge defines an opening through which a path for the treated air is provided. Housing I2 is provided with an annular trough on depression 22 within section I and adjacent and plate ID for a purpose to be described.

The treating portion of section "III is in the form of a rotor 26 having a hollow hub 23 which is rotatably mounted on shaft 2|. Shaft 2| extends through the air conditioning apparatus and rotates within the bearings 24 and 25 which are formed in the plates l3 and M respectively. The power for rotating the shaft 2|, and in turn hub 23 and rotor 26, is transmitted from any suitable source tovthe pulley 21, as by the moto 28 and belt 28 shown in Figs. 1 and 2. r

The rotor 26 is provided with a spiral passageway 30 within which the unconditioned air is treated with a hygroscopic solvent to dehumidii'y it. Passageway 30 is formed by a spirally wound sheet 3| (Fig. 4) which is retained'between the circular end walls 32 and 33 as described in my "prior copending applications Serial No. 87,224, filed June 25, ,1936 a d Serial No. 157,814, filed August 6, 1937.: A pe fcrated sleeve or shell 34 Plate I3 is provided with perforations surrounds the spiral sheet 3| and is secured to end plates 32 and 33 in any desired manner, as by a weld. The perforations in shell 34 are of a size and number to permit the ready ingress of the unconditioned air into the passageway 30.

I The outermost turn of the spirally wound sheet 39 forms with the adjacent turn thereof an entrance for the unconditioned air to the passageway 3h. The innermost turn of sheet 3| forms with its adjacent turn a passageway which communicates with the interior of hub 23 through a series of perforations or openings-35 and thus provides for the passage of fluids intoand out of the passageway 80. The exit from the rotor section it is through an axial opening in 23. Hub 22 is closed at one end, as at 36, and is open at the other exit end. The open end of' hub 23 extends through the openingin the plate it to a point just outside of the plate.

It is now apparent that the unconditioned air, under the influence of a suitable pressure differential developed by, for example, a combination suction and blowing means adjacent the inlet end of the apparatus or a vacuum developing means adjacent the exit end, flows through the perforations IS in the cover plate", through the opening in plate l1 through the space between plate l1 and end plates 32 of the rotor and from it into the spiral passageway 30. The air then passes through the passageway and in dehumidified-air then passes through the open- 4 ings in hub '23 and out of rotor section III through the opening in the hub, for a rehydrating and cooling treatment in a manner to be described. The air is prevented from by-passing the rotor by the provision of a liquid centrifugal seal of the vane and recess type. The seal comprises a seal chamber 38, formed by securing a central-aperture saucer-shaped member 31 to the exterior of plate It), and a rotating vane 39, secured to the free edge of hub 23, which extends into the seal chamber. The seal chamber is' adapted to contain a sealing liquid in which the rotating vane rotates to form the seal as shown and described in. my prior applications Serial No. 9,923, filed March 8, 1935 and Serial No. 87,223, filed June 25, 1936. v If desired, the rubbing-type seal described and claimed in my prior application Serial No. 157,517, filed August 3, 1937 may be adapted for use in my novel air conditioning apparatus in lieu of the seal described above.

The suitable pressure differential means for urging the air through the'perforations l5 and through the rotor,26 as described, may be provided by the combination suction and blowing fan 40. This fan is mounted for rotation on shaft 2| and is positioned in the space between plate l1 and end-plate 32 of the rotor. Fan 40 is provided with a conventional speed-uprdevice, designated by the numeral 4|, which serves to increase the speed of the fan over that of the shaft 2| in a known manner. It is obvious that the rotating fan lli'must develop sufilcient suction to not only urge large quantities of unconditioned air into the apparatus but at the same time to force or flow this air through the rotor and out thereof. The desired force is obtained if the fan is adapted to rotate in the order of I about 1000 to 2000 R. P. M.

The air urged through the rotor dehydrated or dehumidified by means of. a hygroscopic solvent such as, for example, lithium or calcium humidify the air in a manner to be described.

The dehydrated or dehumidified air passing out of'the rotor 26, may, if desired, be introduced into a flash chamber, spray tower and the like and have evaporated therein water in such controlled amounts as to raise the relative humidity of the dehydrated air to the desired point and at the same time to cool itto a temperature that meets the requirements of bodily comfort. I prefer, however, to rehydrate and cool the air passing out of the rotor 26 in the air cooling and rehumidifying section I I referred to above.

Section II is housed within the housing l2 adjacent section III and is provided with only one end-cover plate 42 similar to coverplate 18. An annular trough 43 is formed in housing l2 adjacent plate 42, similar to trough 22, for a purpose to-be described. The treating portion of section II is in the form of a rotor 44 having a hollow hub 45 which is rotatably mounted on shaft 2|. Rotor 44 is provided with a spiral passageway 46 within which the dehydrated air is treated with controlled amounts of water to rehumidify and cool the air. Passageway 46 is formed by a spirally wound sheet 41 which is retained between the circular end walls 48 and 49. A perforated sleeve or shell 50 surrounds the spiral sheet 41 and is secured to end-plates 48 and 49 in any desired manner, as-by a weld. The hub 45 is provided with perforations 5| to permit the ingress and egress of fluids from passageway 46 as well as with an opening in one end thereof to permit the exit of the conditioned air from the rotor. A liquid centrifugal seal 52 is formed on plate 42 and serves to prevent the by-pass of dehumidified air entering the rotor 44. The rotor 44 and its associated hub 45 and seal 52 are shown as being in all respects substantially identical with rotor 26, hub 23 and seal 31; however, this rotormay be omitted and replaced with a spray tower and the like as indicated above or modified as hereinafter described.

It is now obvious that the dehumidified air passing out of hub 23 under the influence of fan 40 enters the space between rotor section I0 and end-plate 48 of rotor 44 and thus passes through the perforations in plate 50 and into the spiral passageway 46. The movement of the dehumidifled air in the space between the rotor sections l0 and II may, if desired, be assisted by means of the impeller blades 53 which are secured to the outside of end-plate 48 (Figs. 3 and 5). The dehumidified air passing through the passageway 46 is then treated with controlled quantities of water to rehumidify the air to the desired point and to lower the temperature to the desired degree. The water is introduced into the system through a valved inlet pipe or conduit 54 which is shown as leading into the interior of hub 45, or it may, ifdesired, be'introduced and flashed at a point interiorly of the rotor for the conditioning treatment of the dehumidified air in a manner to be described. The conditioned air passes out of rotor 44 under the influence of fan 40 and is assisted in its movement out-of the conditioning apparatus by means of a fan 55 secured to the shaft 2| between section H and grill.l4. The conditioned air passing through the openings IS in the grill l4 then mlngles with the surrounding air to condition the latter.

In the operation of the apparatus and in accordance with the method embodying my invention, provision must be made for dehydrating the 6 hygroscopic liquid solvent after it leaves the air conditioning apparatus, and for the return of the dehydrated solvent to the system for reuse. In Fig. 1 I showa cyclic air conditioning system wherein the hygroscopic solvent employed in the air dehydrating section III is a solution of an inorganic hygroscopic salt such as, for example, an aqueous, concentrated solution of lithium or calcium chloride, and in Fig. 2 I show a similarsystem wherein the hygroscopic solvent employed 15 is an organic solvent of high molecular weight such as, for example, glycerin, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether or other glycol derivatives and the like.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 3, with reference to the foregoing, it is apparent that air to be conditioned is sucked into the air-conditioning apparatus by the rotating fan 40 and forced through the passageway 30 of the rotating rotor for treatment with the dehydrating solvent. The rotor 26 25 is'rotated to ,develop a centrifugal force which, dependent on radius and R. P. M., may be severalv hundred times the force of gravity and wherein the effective tangential component of which in the path of travel of the two fluids may be approximately equal to the force of gravity or even,

'less, although I prefer that it be substantially in excess of the force of gravity. In general, I have found it advisable to employ conditions of operation, rates of rotation and the like so that the tangential component of the centrifugal force effective in the operation to force the hygroscopic solvent outwardly through the passageway in the rotor is equivalent to 3 to 5 or-m0re times the force of gravity. A speed of rotation of about 500 40 to 1000 R. P. M. or higher has been found suitable in most instances. Under these conditions, the speed of rotation of the steppedup fan 40 should be in the order of about 1000' to 2000 R. P. M. togenerate a force capable of urging the air through the passageway counter-current to the solvent propelled outwardly therefrom.

The unconditioned air, under the influence of fan 40, is urged through passageway 30 and in its passage therethrough it is brought in contact with a hygroscopic solvent to dehumidify the air to the desired extent. The solvent is introduced to the interior of hub 23 through conduit 4| and is supplied in controlled amounts so that the air' is dehumidified to about 20% of relative humidity when issuing from the rotor. The solvent flows directly from the interior of hub 23 into passage 30. This solvent flows outwardly through the passageway in the form of a fllm or sheet'against one wall of the passageway, due to centrifugal force, counter-currently to the unconditioned air passing inwardly therethrough. The solvent therefore contacts and scrubs the unconditioned air to dehumidify it, the two streams of fluid being brought together intimately at their sur- 65 faces of contact by the centrifugal force applied. The solvent is brought into' such intimate and extended contact with the air flowing countercurrent thereto that the heat of absorption of the moisture extracted from the air is localized in 7 the eiiluent splvent and is not imparted in any material degree to the ellluent dried air. Due to the rapidity with which 'the solvent is propelled out of the passageway, its entrainment in the air undergoing dehumidiflcation is almost en- 7 tirely prevented; Insulation material 56 surrounds the housing l2 in the portion overlying section In and insulation material 51 is aflixed to wall or plate l6 to prevent the transfer of any heat from secton I to the exteriorof the apparatus or to section II thereof.

The spent hygroscopic liquid passing out of passageway 30 collects in the bottom of section l0 within the housing from which it is urged into drain 58 positioned at the bottom of annular trough 22. All foreign matter such as dust and the like removedfrom the air by the solvent is carried into drain 58 along with the spent solvent. The movement of the spent solvent into drain 56 is assisted by the centrifugal pumping action of the annular plate 59 which is shown as secured to end-plate 33 of rotor 26 ,and as extending into trough 22. The foreign matter is urged and settles to the bottom of drain 58 from which it is periodically removed.

The supernatant spent solvent above drain and from which all foreign matter has been removed by centrifugal action of pump-member 59,

flows through exit conduit 60, through coil 6| wherein it is heated by burner 62 to evaporate the moisture therefrom and into flash chamber 63 wherein the moisture is flashed ofi from the solvent and vented to an area outside of the space to be conditioned. The reconditioned solvent then flows through a coil 64, cooled by fan 65 'and through conduit 66 for return to the apparatus to treat additional incoming air. A reservoir 61 is provided for supplying the solvent to the apparatus or for receiving the solvent flowing from cooling coil 64.

The dehydrated or dehumidified air passing out of section l0 under the influence of fan 40, passes through the passageway between rotor sections I 0 and H and is assisted in its movement therethrough by vanes 53. The dehumidified air then passes through passageway 46 and is treated in its passage with controlled amounts of water to rehumidify the air in the order of about 45% to 50% of relative humidity and at the same time to cool it in the order of about to F. below that of the incoming air. The controlled quantities of water are introduced through valved inlet to the interior of hub 45 and passes therefrom into passageway 46 and out therethrough in a manner described in connection with the solvent entering conduit 4|- over that necessary torehumidify and cool the dehumidified air to the desired extent.

The now conditioned air, still under the influence of the fan 40, is pushed out of hub 45 and through the openings I6 in grill l4. The conditioned air is assisted in this movement by the fan 55.

When an organic solvent such as a glycol derivative is used to dehumidify air in the manner described, the system shown in Fig. 2 is used.

dehumidifying section I!) flows through the exitconduit 60, through a coil 10 cooled by fan 1| and into a conventional electro-endosmotic cell 12 to dehydrate the solvent. The dehydrated solvent then flows through conduit "connected with inlet conduit 4| to treat the air as described above. The separated water, in controlled quantitles as before, then flows through conduit I4,

through inlet conduit 54 and thus into section II to treat the dehumidified air as hereinabove deable openings in the first two or three turns of spiral sheet 41 so that" the water introduced through inlet 54 is flashed into the dehumifled air entering the rotor over the first two or three turns to rehydrate and cool the air. The remaining portion of spiral sheet 4 1 is imperforate so that the air and water pass counter-currently therethrough as described and wash the conditioned air before it leaves the rotor to remove any impurities therein.

If desired, a suitable germicidal agent,such as, I

a copper salt in the case of the inorganic solvents and of, for example, benzylphenol in the caseof an organic solvent, maybe included with the hygroscopic solvent to sterilize, as well as air con dition, the air treated in a manner hereinabove described especially when the device is to be used in private dwellings, oflices, hospitals and the like; Aromatic materials such as perfume and the like may also be incorporated with the hygroscopic solvent to perfume or impart a particular odor to the conditioned air where'desired.

While in the description of my invention I have referred to, and in the drawings I have shown,

valves for controlling the quantities of solvent and water introduced into the apparatus, it is of course obvious that v.the apparatus may be equipped with suitable known automatic metering means and controls for controlling the flow of materials into and out of the apparatus, the dehumidiflcation and rehumidification of the air and other variables of the process.

The broad process embodying my invention may be carried out by suitable apparatus other than that hereinabove described. Thus, for example, the apparatus shown in Fig. '3 may be modified by eliminating the fans 40 and and by the substitution for the rehumidifying rotor 44 of a rehumidifying rotor having a larger diameter than dehydrating rotor 26. The hub of this rotor is open at the end adjacent the exit end of hub 23 of rotor 26 to provide-direct communication between the rotors and is closed at the other end.

In this manner, a suction is developed in this I modified rotor during rotation thereof which sucks or pulls air from the outside and into and through rotor 26 for the dehydrating treatment as described. The dehydrated air then flows from hub 23 to the hub of this modified rotor and is urged outwardly through the rotor along V with and in the same direction as the water rehydrating and cooling of the air.

The apparatus shown in the drawings and described above and, in particular, Figs. 3, 4 and 5 taken in conjunction with the accompanying description thereof, is especially adapted for use in times of war. Thus, the apparatus may be used to treat the air entering trenches, subterranean fortification systems, gun emplacements, war

for

. tanks, or buildings in a war zone to remove therefrom solid and/or gaseous poisons, toxic, irritat ing or other harmful substances entrained or suspended therein. The apparatus is very compact and very efficient and is capable of delivering a positive and unfailing fiow (aside from actual mechanical wrecking thereof) of de-poisoned and de-toxicized air to the enclosure to be conditioned, thereby dispensing with the need of gas masks while within such air-conditioned enclosure.

In accordance with this phase of my invention, air containing poisons, lachrymants, vomiting agents, sneezers, etc. can be treated in my apparatus by urging it inwardly in the rotating path of increasing radius by a sustained applied force while propelling a suitable, preferably inexpensive, liquid absorbent or reagent outwardly by centrifugal force, in counter-current contact with the laden air. Thus, it is possible, in accordance with my invention, to remove from air such poisons or toxic agents as, for example, chlorine, xylyl bromide, bromethylmethylketone, trichlormethylchloroformate, chlorpicrin, dischlorethylsulfide (mustard gas),diphenylchlorarsine, chlorvinyldichlorarsine or the like by the aid of, for example, water, solutions of caustic soda or potash, sodium carbonate or chloride of lime; or poisonous mixtures such as phosgene and chlorine by the aid of a solution of sodium phenate having an excess of caustic or a solution of sodium sulphanilate. The specific absorbents or reagents capable of removing specific poisons or toxic agents from air are now well-known and form no part of my invention.

In carrying out this phase of my invention, the air conditioning apparatus is secured, interiorly, in any desirable manner to a wall 80 of a reasonably air-tight enclosure such as a trench, subterranean fortification, war tank and the like with perforated cover plate l3 in communication with the outside contaminated or poison-laden air. More than one such apparatus may be used, if necessary, since it is intended that the only air to be breathed by persons within the enclosure, be i that conditioned by the apparatus.

The rotor mechanism may be rotated as 'described above or may be rotated by other suitable sources of power such as by suitable connections to the motor of, for example, a war tank. The contaminated or poison-laden air outside of the enclosure is sucked into the apparatus through the perforations i5by the rotating fan 40 and is forced through the passageway of the rotating- The contaminated air under the influence of fan is urged through passageway 30 and in its passage therethrough it is brought in contact with a suitable liquid solvent or reagent to depoison or detoxify the air. The solvent or reagent is introduced to the interior of hub 23 through conduit ti and is supplied in sufficient quantities to remove poison or toxic agents from the air. The solvent or reagent flows directly from the interior of hub 23 into passageway 30. This liquid flows outwardly through the passagecurrently to the unconditioned air passing inwardly therethrough. The liquid therefore contacts and scrubs the unconditioned air to remove the poisons or toxic agents therefrom. It appears that the two counter-currently moving 5 streams of fluids are brought together intimately at their surfaces of contact by the centrifugal force applied. Due to the rapidity with which the solvent or reagent is propelled outwardly from the passage-way, its entrainment in the air undergoing treatment is almost entirely prevented.

The liquid solvent or reagent containingtherein dissolved or absorbed poisons or toxic agents collects in the bottom of section III within the housing from which it is urged to drain 5! positioned at the bottom of annular trough 22. All other foreign matter such as dust and the like removed from the air by the solvent or reagent is also carried into drain 58 along therewith. The

"movement of the solvent or reagent containing 20 the poisons, toxic agents, dust and the like into drain 5! is assisted by the centrifugal pumping action of annular plate 59.' The solvent or retion or reagent to be used in the. apparatus may be metered from any suitable siipply tank. as

The air conditioned as described above is, in most instances, sufficiently free from poisons or toxic substances as to be breathed safely by persons within the enclosure and hence may be passed directly out of the apparatus through end 40 plate- H or in any other desired manner without further treatment. Asan added precaution, or to remove additional poisons or toxic agents not removed by the first treatment, the air passing out of section l0 may be subjected to a second counter-current contact treatment for removal of other or additional poisons or toxic agents, either the same or other appropriate solvent or reagent being used for this purpose.

Thus, the conditioned air passing out of section l0, still under the influence of fan 40, may be caused to pass into and through the rotor in section II as described above The air in its passage through passageway 46 of the rotor in section II is contacted and scrubbed with a suitable solvent or reagent metered into the apparatus through conduit 54 and caused to 'flowoutwardly therefrom by centrifugal force developed by rotation of the rotor. The spent solvent or reagent is then caused to pass out of the appa- 60 ratus through conduit 68 as described above.

The now conditioned air, still under the infiuence of fan 40, is pushed out of hub and through the openings [6 in grill. I4, the conditioned air being assisted in this movement by 55 fan 55.

The specific character of the passageway of increasing radius through which the fluids to be treated are brought into intimate contact may be varied as described in my above-mentioned 7 copending applications and for many purposes it is desirable to make use of the rotor constructions shown and described in my prior copending application Serial No. 9923, filed May 8, 1935.

'While I have particularly described my inven- 75 tionlin connection with air conditioning and for use for war purposes in war zones, it is obvious that my invention is also applicable to the removal of toxic andirritating solids and gases s from the air of industrial establishments, particularly in such establishments where. chlorination treatments, nitration treatments, treatments with volatile acids such as hydrochloric and hydrofluoric and the like are performed.

I claim: 1

1. The method of conditioning air comprising introducing unconditioned air and a hygroscopic liquid into apassageway of increasing radius, rotating said passageway to develop centrifugal force and cause-the liquid to move outwardly 2.' The method of conditioning air comprising introducing unconditioned air and a hygroscopic liquid into a spiral passageway, rotating said passageway to develop centrifugal force'andcause the liquid to move outwardly through the passageway, urging the unconditioned air inwardly through the passageway while maintainingcontact between the fluids whereby the air'is dehu midifled, introducing the dehumidifled air and controlled amounts of water into a second spiral passageway, rotating said second spiral passage- 40 way to develop centrifugal force and cause the water to move outwardly through the passageway, urging the dehumidifled air inwardlythrough the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluids whereby the dehumidifled air is rehumidified and cooled to the desired degree.

3. The method of conditioning air-comprising introducing unconditioned air and a solution of an inorganic hygroscopic materialinto a passageway of increasing radius, rotating said passageway to develop centrifugal force and cause the solution of inorganic hygroscopic material to move outwardly through the passageway, urging the unconditioned air inwardly through the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluids whereby the air is dehumidifled, introducing the dehumidifled air and'controlled amounts of water into a second passageway of increasing radius,

rotating said second passageway to develop cenwhereby all is dehumidifled, introducing the dehumidified air and controlled amounts of water rotating said second passageway todevelop centrifugal force and cause the water to move outwardly through the passageway, urging the dehumidifled air inwardly through the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluids f whereby the dehumidifled air is rehumidifled and cooled to the desired degree.

5. The method of conditioning air comprising.

introducing unconditioned air and controlled amounts of a hygroscopic liquid into a passageway of increasing radius, rotating said passageway to develop centrifugal force and cause the liquid to move' outwardly through the passageway, urging the unconditioned air inwardly through. the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluids whereby the air is dehumidifled in the order of about 20% of relative humidity, introducing the dehumidifled air and controlled amounts of water into a second passageway of increasing radius, rotating said second passagewayto develop centrifugal force and cause the water to move outwardly through the passageway, urging the dehumidifled air inwardly through the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluids whereby the air is rehumidified in the order of about 45 to 50% of relative humidity and thereby cooled in the order of about 10 to 15 F. below the incoming unconditioned air.

6. The cyclic method of conditioning air comprising'introducing unconditioned air and a hygroscopic liquid into a passageway'of increasing radius, rotating said passageway to develop centrifugal force and cause the liquidto move outwardly through the passageway, urging the unconditioned air inwardly through the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluidswhereby the air is dehumidifled, introducing the dehumidifled air and controlled amounts of water into a second passageway of increasing radius, rotating said second passageway to develop centrifugal force and cause the water to move outwardly through the passageway, urging the de-. humidified air inwardly through the passageway while maintaining contact between the fluids whereby the clehumidifled air is rehumidifled and cooled to the desired degree, and continuously withdrawing the spent hygroscopic liquid from the passageway, removing the water therefrom and returning the revivified hygroscopic liquid to the passageway for reuse. v

7. The method set forth in claim 6 wherein the hygroscopic liquid is an aqueous solution of an inorganic hygroscopic material.

8. The method set forth in claim 6 wherein the hygroscopic liquid is an organic hygroscopic liquid.

9. In apparatus for conditioning air, a housing structure, a shaft rotatably mounted therein, a pair of rotors mounted on said shaft, each of said rotors having a passageway increasing in radius from its inner end to its outer end, means for advancing-air to be conditioned in seriatlm through the? passageways of said rotors, means for introducing a hygroscopic liquid to the inner end'of oneeofrsaid passageways, means forlintroducing water to the inner end of the other of said passageway and means for rotating the shaft and rotors whereby the liquids are urged outwardly through said passageways by centrifugal force. I

10. In combination with a wall of an enclosed space,. an apparatus for removing poisons, toxic agents or other harmful substances from air to into a second passageway of increasing radius, be introducedinto such space, said apparatus II comprising an air inlet communicating with-the air outside of said space and an air outlet through which conditions air passes into said space, a rotor having a passageway increasing in radius from its inner 'end to its outer end, means for rotating said rotor, means for introducing a liquid capable of removing harmful substances from air to the inner end of the passageway and means for conducting air from said air inlet to said outer end of said passageway and urging the air through said passageway and discharging it from the inner end into said air outlet, said liquid being urged outwardly throughsai'd passageway by centrifugal force set up by rotation of which conditioned air passes into said space, a

rotor, a second rotor adjacent thereto, each of said rotors having a passageway increasing in radius from its inner end to its outer end, means forming a passageway from the inner end of the passageway of the first rotor to the outer end of the passageway of the second rotor, means for rotating said rotors, means for introducing liquids capable of removing harmful substances from air to the inner ends of said passageways, and means for urging the air to be conditioned seriatim through the passageways of said rotors, said liquids being urged outwardly through said passageways due to centrifugal force set up by rotation of the rotors countercurrently to the air being urged inwardly therethrough whereby the latter is contacted by said liquids and has removed therefrom the harmful substances.

12. In an apparatus for conditioning air, a casing and arotor therein, said rotor including walls defining apassageway, means for introducing a liquid into said passageway at one end thereof, said passageway increasing in radius from said end toward the opposite end thereof, a second rotor within said casing, said second rotor in 10 cluding walls defining a passageway of decreasing radius from one end thereof to the opposite end thereof,,air moving means cooperating with the casing to cause air to be conditioned to enter the l first passageway through the end opposite the end where the liquid is introduced and flow through the passageway to the first mentioned end, then to enter the second mentioned passageway through said one end and flow through the passageway to the opposite end thereof and to be discharged from said casing, means for introducthe air flows to the end of said second named passageway into which the air is introduced.

14. In combination with the apparatus set forth in claim 12, means for removing the liquid urged outwardly through the passageway of said first named rotor, means for treating said liquid to remove moisture therefrom and means for return- -.ing the treated liquid to said first named passageway at the said one end thereof;

- WALTER J. PODBIELNIAK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2876507 *Jan 18, 1957Mar 10, 1959Borg WarnerMethod of deodorizing and sterilizing air in enclosed spaces
US3065043 *May 23, 1958Nov 20, 1962Midland Ross CorpAir purification
US3320723 *Jun 9, 1964May 23, 1967Airtex CorpGas conditioning unit and method for drying gas
US4279628 *Dec 31, 1979Jul 21, 1981Energy Synergistics, Inc.Apparatus for drying a natural gas stream
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/92, 62/317, 62/94, 261/22, 95/188, 62/78, 422/4, 261/3
International ClassificationF24F3/14
Cooperative ClassificationF24F3/1411, F24F2003/144, F24F3/1417
European ClassificationF24F3/14C1, F24F3/14C