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Publication numberUS2230186 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 28, 1941
Filing dateFeb 25, 1939
Priority dateFeb 25, 1939
Publication numberUS 2230186 A, US 2230186A, US-A-2230186, US2230186 A, US2230186A
InventorsKenneth E Andrews, Robert I Johns
Original AssigneeKenneth E Andrews, Robert I Johns
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable lamp shade
US 2230186 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan 28, 1941. R. l. JOHNS ETAL 2,230,186

` I AbJUSTABLE LAMP SHADE Filed Feb. 25, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet l w ff@ 3mm/Wold;

Jan. 28, 1941. R, l. JOHNS ET AL ADJUSTABLE LAMP SHADE Filed Feb. 25, 1939 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Jan. 1941 UNITED STATES PATENT oFFclaA Application February 25, 1939., Serial No. 258,486

9 Claims. (Cl. 2li-108) Primarily the shade consists of one or more rows, or tiers, of small plates. These plates overlap or closely adjoin, laterally, and form together a band or row of such plates attached near the middle, and to one side, to a horizontal frame wire. Thus the tops or bottoms ofthe plates may be inclined inward or outward at will, thus changing their angles and consequently the form of the shade. There may be several of these tiers or rows of articulated plates. each with its horizontal sustaining frame wire.

Lighting falls generally into two classes, direct and indirect. To secure both, at present, two fixtures must generally be used; Yor if both types are combined in one ilxture, additional bulbs,

reflectors and switches are needed. The new type of shade according to the present invention allows either type of lighting at will, either wholly direct, wholly indirect, or a number of degrees in between.

The relationship of parts according to the invention is readily adaptable to various forms of illumination, such for' example as table lamps, ceiling iixtures, and the like.

On the accompanying sheets of drawings, illustrating the details of presently preferred embodiments of the invention- Figs. 1 and la are elevational views of the de vice according to the invention as applied, for instance, to a table lamp: Y

Fig. 2 is a vertical cross section through the Y said device as shown in Fig. 1;

larged scale, showing the relationship of parts of the lamp shade of the invention;

Figs. 8, 9 and 10 are diagrammatic showings of the lamp shade as used on a ceiling fixture, closed at the bottom; and

Figs. 11, 12 and 13 are diagrammatic showings of the lamp shade as used on a ceiling ilxture, in combination with a silvered bottom bulb.

Corresponding parts are indicated by like reference numerals throughout the several gures l of drawings.

The lamp shade according to the invention includes essentially, in any of the many modications which it may assume, a wire supporting frame. In the two-section shade which constiu tutes the preferred form of the device, this wire frame is composed o1' two rings il! and l I, spaced from each other and supported by braces I2, as shown.

The wire supporting frameis preferably aSsociated in any suitable or desired conventional manner with conventional means for attaching the shade to either the bulb upon which it is to be mounted or to the socket, generally provided on the lamp base, ceiling fixture or the like, with which the shade is to be associated. Thus, for example, use may expediently be made of conventional spring clips attached to frame ring Il and clamping on the bulb I3, or of a threaded ring attached to frame ring I 0 and screwing on the socket.

Each section of the lamp shade preferably consists of a plurality of overlapping arcuate strips or plates I4, I5. These overlapping strips t evenly about frame rings l0 and il and overlap to a substantial extent, as shown, to allow for increased continuous circumference when the section is flared either at the top or at the bottom.

'I'he overlapping strips are severally attached o to the frame rings by means of clip means which may assume any one of a number of designs. As shown more particularly. in Figs. 5 and 6, this means may advantageously assume the form of a rivet I I, the prongs I'I of which extend through 45 adjacent plates I4, I5 at juxtaposed points a short distance from the edges thereof. Each plate is thus attached at two points, one on each side thereof. The prongs I1, after traversing the plates, are bent around the corresponding frame ring and adjustably encompass the same. The relationship of the parts is mich that the plates can turn on the Shanks of the respective rivets I6 while the prongs can slide around the corresponding frame ring. It is thus possible to ust the plates of each section to alter the ditgmeter at each end thereof from minimum to maximum and vice versa. The diameter of the section atthe middle of the plates, where the clip means is located, remains constant and sub-v stantially equal to the diameter of the particular frame ring plus four times the plate thickness. Any desi-red degree of upward or downward flare may thus be achieved.

'I'he amountthat the plates of a section overlaps can. be adjusted to suit the design of the shade.

I'he plates, when made of relatively soft or rough material, retain their adjusted position owing to the compressive action of the attaching rivets and their friction on each other. When Ithe plates arev of relatively hard or smooth material, a small coil spring or spring washer I8 may advantageously be arranged under the rivet head, as shown more particularly in Fig. 6.

The number of sections may be varied, the number of rings of the supporting frame being correspondingly varied.- The diameters of the i'ramerings as well as the distance therebetween, the length, width, shape and point of attachment of the plates or strips are all, to some extent at least, variable and may be adjusted to suit the preferred design of shade.' By way of example,

Figs. 1 and 1a show two of the numerous possible A shapes of a two section shade on a table lamp.

'I'he vertical spokes or spacing braces l 2 which hold the horizontal frame wires in fixed relation to each other and to the central ring engaging the lamp base or socket, or supporting fixture, may be curved or angled to permit the swing or play oi' the outer plates when tilted inward or outward.. 'I'he holes in the plates may be lined with grommets or small eyes. so as to protect the plates from cutting or enlargement of the holes due to frequent changes in position of the plates. 'I'hese grommets are similar to the eyes used in uppers of shoes through which to pass shoe strings.

The shade may be made of any material. If

translucency is required, it may be made of spunv glass treated with plastic resinous solution, or coated with any translucent material as a lacquer or varnish. It may be made also of .plastic sheet, parchment paper, glass plates, fabric treated or untreated, or any other translucent material.

If translucency is not required (as in use for indirect lighting purposes, when the shade reallyv functions as a reiiector) then metal or any other opaque material may be used.

It may also be coated on inside with a translucent reecting material or coating, and may be decorated in any design and made in any color or combinations thereof, and with any necessary i decora-tive bindings, or trimmings.

Figs. 8 to 13, inclusive, show the invention as applied to -ceiling lighting. Here again, the device consists essentially'of a supporting frame and of tiers of adjust-able plates mounted thereon, substantially as hereinbefore described. Conventional attaching means for supporting the shade on the bulb or on the fixture are again employed.

In Figs. 8, 9 and 10, the lower tier of plates con- 1 verges to an apex to given an indirect lighting effect. A similar effect may be obtained by using a bulb with a silvered bottom I9, as in Figs. 11 and 12. When metal .plates are used asthe bottom row or tierthe latter forms a reflector to throw the light against the upper .tier and thence downward to the room.

A direct lighting effect is obtained by the arrangement according to Fig. .13.

Having described the invention, what is claimed and desired to -be protected by Letters Patent is:

1. A shade of the character described comprising essentially a supporting frame including a supporting annulus. and an annular tier of shadedening plates arranged in mutually overlapping relationship on said annulus, and clip means movably interconnecting adjacent plates to each other,

and to said supporting annulus, said clip means extending through the overlapping portions of each pair of adjacent plates into-encompassing relationship with the adjacent portion of said 'supporting annulus.

y2. A shade of the character described comprising essentially a supporting frame including a plurality of spaced supporting annuli, brace means interconnecting said annuli and retaining the same in spaced relationship, an annular tier of shade-defining plates arranged in mutually overlapping relationship on each said annulus, and clip means movably interconnecting adjacent plates of each tier to each other and to the corresponding supporting annulus, said clip means extending through the overlapping portions of each pair of adjacent plates of each tier into encompassing relationship with the adjacent portion of the corresponding annulus.

3. A shade of the character described comprising essentially a supporting frame including a plurality of spaced supporting annuli, brtce means interconnecting said 'annuli and retain g the same in spaced relationship, an annular tier ofv shade-defining plates arranged in mutually overlapping relationship on each said annulus. and clip means movably interconnecting adjacent plates of each tier to each other and to the corresponding supporting annulus, whereby a varable degree o1 ilare may be imparted to said tiers,

said brace means being Ainwardly o'set intermedilining arcuate plates arranged in mutually overr lapping relationship on each said annulus, cli-p means movably interconnecting adjacent plates of each tier to each other and to the corresponding supporting annulus, whereby a variable degree of upward or downward Iflare may be impartedl to said tiers and a pluralitybf shade configurations achieved, and means for mounting said shade onto a supporting fixture, said means being attached to one of said annuli.

5. A shade of the character described as dened in claim 4 in combination with a depending light fixture including -a depending bulb, the low`- ermost of said tiers :being of upwardly opening conical configuration and wholly enclosing said bulb, whereby an indirect lighting eiect is achieved. i

6. A shade of the character described as defined in claim 4 in combination with a depending light xture including a depending bulb having a silvered bottom, the lowermost of said ytiers being of upwardly open, upwardly fiaring frusto-conical .7, A shade of the character described as deinwardly offset supned in claim 4, said plates being made of lightpenetrable material capable o1' being variously colored and ornamented.

8. A shade of the character described as defined in claim 4, the plates of at least one tier being made of light-impenetrable material, whereby the interior surfaces thereof function as reiiecting surfaces.

9. A shade of =the vcharacter described as dened in claim 4 in combination with a light xture including a silvered bulb, one of said Itiers partially encompassing said bulb.

ROBERT I. JOHNS. KENNETH E. ANDREWS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2496482 *Aug 14, 1947Feb 7, 1950Emeloid Co IncLamp shade and method of making the same
US2683800 *Feb 21, 1950Jul 13, 1954Tradelius CarlLamp shade
US2702341 *Apr 13, 1951Feb 15, 1955Tradelius CarlLamp shade
US2732489 *Dec 5, 1950Jan 24, 1956 Lampshades
US2899543 *Aug 30, 1957Aug 11, 1959 X t table lamp and shade
US4001576 *Aug 25, 1975Jan 4, 1977Goddard Stephen A ALamp shade
US6309091Feb 28, 2000Oct 30, 2001William WeissmanLamp shade assembly
US8075162 *Sep 9, 2009Dec 13, 2011Light Prescriptions Innovators, LlcZoom luminaire with compact non-imaging lens-mirror optics
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/291, 362/357, 362/414, 312/229, 362/352, 362/296.1, 362/360, 362/433, 362/297
International ClassificationF21V1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V1/00
European ClassificationF21V1/00