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Publication numberUS2230397 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1941
Filing dateOct 14, 1937
Priority dateSep 6, 1937
Publication numberUS 2230397 A, US 2230397A, US-A-2230397, US2230397 A, US2230397A
InventorsCrowford Abraham Lewis
Original AssigneeCrowford Abraham Lewis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Acoustic apparatus for the deaf
US 2230397 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 4, 1941. 1..c. ABRAHAM ACOUSTIC APPARATUS FOR THE DEAF Filed Oct. 14, 1937 I Inventor; Lewis Crow/5rd Abraham flno e Patented Feb. 4, 1941 ACOUSTIC APPARATUS FOR. THE DEAF Lewis Crawford Abraham, Etterbeek-Brussels,

Belgl Application October 14, weasel-mm. 169,045

In Belgium September 6, 1937 2 Claims. (01. 179 1o 7) There are different types of acoustic apparatus, which are intended to relieve persons suffering from deafness. The present invention be longs to the type of apparatus known as working by osseous conduction, and which consists of a transmitter and an amplifier, which transmit the sounds to a vibrator which is kept afllxed behind the ear on the mastoid, so as to cause an excitement of the tympanum cavity. The amlu pliflcator is usually excited by a. weak electrical current supplied by a special battery.

These apparatus, however, have a serious drawback: A way has to be devised which will allow the vibrator to be applied and maintained against the mastoid, the power of perception being due to the pressure of the vibrator on the bone. Generally, a head-band is employed for the purpose, this, however, is not only unaesthetical, but may cause pain, sometimes even wounds. Apart from this, practice has demonstrated that the acoustic conduction by the mastoid varies greatly according to the individuals; in some cases the results are totally inadequate, or even null. Lastly, another inconvenience is that all the contrivances 01' this category, known until now, only act on one ear. If the two ears are to be influenced simultaneously, it would be necessary to design an apparatus possessing at least two vibrators together with their conducting lines.

On'the other hand, it is a well known fact that the teeth and jawbone conduct sound far more eiliciently. The present day contrivances working by osseous conduction originate from the primitive apparatus, such as the audiphone, which 35 consists of a plate of hardened flexible rubber, and of an handle. The user tightens the rubber plate, the superior extremity of which is held tight between the teeth, by means of a thin cord.

The object of the present invention is to improve and increase the power of the present day osseous conduction apparatus, as also to do away with their faults and annoyances. It consists of a a combination of these apparatus or at least of the vibrator with an article usually held in the mouth, such as a pipe, a cigar-holder, a cigaretteholder, which will vibrate in harmony with the vibrator of which it constitutes the casing, and

which will transmit these vibrations to the teeth,

and from them to the auditory organs. The invention can be adapted to any type of apparatusknown; which work by osseous conduction. Therefore, it takes in the simple appliance with vibrator and receiver as well as the complex apparatus, electromagnetic, with vibrator, transmitter, transformer-amplifier, and receiver.

Materially, the invention consists of an every day smoker's implement to be held in the mouth in the usual manner, and which acts as a casing 6 to contain a vibrator of any type whatsoever, which is a part of any known apparatus for the transmission of sound waves.

, Evidently, one can conceive a vibrator of especially studied shape which can be adapted to 10 fit in the stem of a, cigar holder, or in the bowl of a pipe; one can also make direct use of this stem as an integral part of the vibrator.

As an exampleto which the invention is not limitedthe attached drawing shows the applil5 cation of the invention to the case of a smokers pipe.

Fig. 1 is a general view in partial section of a first use.

Fig. 2 is the'section of a second realisation.

In Fig. 1, I shows a pipe, the shape of which does not matter. In the bowl and in the thick part of the'stem, an electro-magnetic vibrator has been fitted; it consists of a diaphragm 2' connected with a closed box 3 by a projection 4 which constitutes the onlypoinrt of contact between the diaphragm and the housing for transmitting vibrations to the pipe. The bottom of this housing is in close contact with the pipestem, so that the vibrations of the plate which are transmitted to the box 3, are also communicated to the pipe-stem. This stem can be made of a special substance which facilitates the transmission. Two pieces of soft iron 55 round which the coils 6 are wound are fixed to the two extremities of a permanent magnet 1 by means of two adjusting screws 8. The modulated current supplied by the amplifier 9 excited by the dry battery 10 passes by means of the wires ll through the coils and causes the rods 5-5 to vibrate and these vibrations are transmitted to the bottom of the box 3. 12 shows the trans mitter which receives and transmits the sounds; this transmitter may be of any type whatever. As shown in Fig. 1, the mouth-piece of the pipe is unbored by preference (l3). In Fig. 2, it will be seen that the vibrator, identical with that of Fig. 1, is built directly in the pipe, and the bowl and the stem form the box 3 of the vibrator. The lug extends from the bottom of the floor of the cavity in which the vibrator is installed and this results in communicating the vibrations through the. material of the holder to the mouthpiece and as the mouth-piece is gripped by the a 2. In an acoustic apparatus for deaf, a member shaped like a tobacco pipe forming a holder and having a bit for transmitting vibrations to the mouth of a holder thereof through the holdeTs teeth. the bowl portion of said pipe having a 5 cavity, a vibrator in said cavity, and the floor of said cavity having a lug rising above the floor of the cavity engaged by the vibrator through which vibrations are communicated to the holder and from thence through the bit to the teeth of the 10 holder of the bit. i

LEWIS CROWFORD ABRAHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2439459 *Aug 6, 1945Apr 13, 1948Television Associates IncSound pickup unit
US2868876 *Jun 20, 1952Jan 13, 1959Ruggero TicchioniVocal device
US2977425 *Sep 14, 1959Mar 28, 1961Irwin H ColeHearing aid
US5455842 *Jan 12, 1994Oct 3, 1995Mersky; BarryMethod and apparatus for underwater communication
US7844064May 29, 2007Nov 30, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US7844070 *Feb 7, 2007Nov 30, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US7876906Feb 7, 2007Jan 25, 2011Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US8170242Dec 11, 2008May 1, 2012Sonitus Medical, Inc.Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US8177705Nov 5, 2010May 15, 2012Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US8233654Aug 25, 2010Jul 31, 2012Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
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US8270638Oct 15, 2009Sep 18, 2012Sonitus Medical, Inc.Systems and methods to provide communication, positioning and monitoring of user status
US8358792Dec 23, 2009Jan 22, 2013Sonitus Medical, Inc.Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US8585575May 14, 2012Nov 19, 2013Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US8588447Jul 17, 2012Nov 19, 2013Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US8649535Sep 13, 2012Feb 11, 2014Sonitus Medical, Inc.Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US8712077Jul 20, 2010Apr 29, 2014Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US9113262Oct 17, 2013Aug 18, 2015Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US9143873Oct 17, 2013Sep 22, 2015Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US9185485Jun 19, 2012Nov 10, 2015Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20070280491 *Feb 7, 2007Dec 6, 2007Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20070280493 *Feb 7, 2007Dec 6, 2007Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20070286440 *May 29, 2007Dec 13, 2007Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmitting vibrations
US20090097685 *Dec 11, 2008Apr 16, 2009Sonitus Medical, Inc.Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20090268932 *Mar 5, 2009Oct 29, 2009Sonitus Medical, Inc.Microphone placement for oral applications
US20100098270 *Oct 15, 2009Apr 22, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Systems and methods to provide communication, positioning and monitoring of user status
US20100189288 *Dec 23, 2009Jul 29, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20100220883 *May 13, 2010Sep 2, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Actuator systems for oral-based appliances
US20100312568 *Aug 2, 2010Dec 9, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20100322449 *Aug 25, 2010Dec 23, 2010Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20110026740 *Jul 20, 2010Feb 3, 2011Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
US20110116659 *Jan 21, 2011May 19, 2011Sonitus Medical, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing audio signals
Classifications
U.S. Classification381/326, 181/127, 381/162
International ClassificationA61F11/04, A61F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F11/045
European ClassificationA61F11/04M