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Publication numberUS2235142 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1941
Filing dateNov 16, 1938
Priority dateNov 16, 1938
Publication numberUS 2235142 A, US 2235142A, US-A-2235142, US2235142 A, US2235142A
InventorsDye Edith F
Original AssigneeDye Edith F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Artificial leg attaching means
US 2235142 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 18, 1941. E. R. DYE

ARTIFICIAL LEG ATTAGHING MEANS Filed Nov. 16, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet- 1 jfikwior I [dawn ED ye, mm 55 0 7' 776 March 18, 1941; E. R. DYE

ARTIFICIAL L3G ATTACHING HEANS Filed Nov. 16, 1938 2 shee zs-shegt 2 E .Z'wuewz'for award 6396,

48 Ear veyfs Patented Mar. 18, 1 941 UNITED STATES ARTIFICIAL LEG ATTACHING Edward R. Dye, Monticello, Ind.; Edith F. Dye v I executrix of Edward R. Dye, deceased Application November 16, 1938, Serial No. 240,627-

3 Claims.

This invention relates to means for attaching and retaining in position artificial legs for belowthe-knee amputations and has for a primary object the provision of attaching means in such form that there will be no gripping thereby such as would cause a restriction or cutting off of the blood circulation and further, that will permit a perfect relaxation when the knee is flexed such as in the sitting position.

Other important objects of the invention are to provide a light and durable attaching means which may be readily engaged and disengaged and be confined entirely about the knee.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those versed in the art in the following description of 'the invention as illustrated more or less diagrammatically in the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a side elevation of astructure embodying the invention;

Fig. 2, a top plan view;

Fig. 3, a rear elevation;

Fig. 4, a front view on an enlarged scale of the attaching means disengaged from the artificial member;

Fig. 5, a side elevation of a slightly modified form;

Fig. 6, a top plan view of the modified form;

Fig. 7, a rear elevation of that modified form; and

Fig. 8, a front View on an enlarged scale of the modified form of attaching means disengaged from the artificial member.

Like characters of reference indicate like parts throughout the several views in the drawings.

. Referring to the drawings, to that form as shown in Figs. 1-4, the usual artificial member ID is formed to be open from its upper end and provided with a cavity formed to receive snugly the stump l I of the leg of the user. The artificial member I0 per se does not constitute the invention which resides instead in the peculiar means for attaching this member ID to the leg l2.

In the form shown in Figs. 1-4, I employ two separate straps generally designated by the numerals l3 and M. The strap [3 has an end l5 which is permanently secured preferably to the side of the member ID by any suitable means such as a screw H5. The end 15 is preferably provided with a plurality of holes through which the screw l6 may be passed in order to secure proper adjustment in conformity with the shape and size of the leg l2. From the point of adjustment as designated by the screw IS, the strap I3 is carried upwardly and over to the center of the leg immediately behind the kneecaptopass freely through a loop I! from the under side thereof and then is turned backwardly to come back down on the same side of the leg and around under the leg toterminate by an end l8 on the. 5 opposite side of the leg to engage over a button l9 fixed to the member ID. The end I8 is preferably provided with a plurality of holes in spaced apart relation so that this end may be adjustably engaged with the button [9 to secure the desired 10 degree, of pressure about the leg l2.

In similar fashion the strap I4 is secured by an end 20 on the side of the artificial member H) by any suitable means such as a screw 2| which is substantially diametrically opposite the screw IS on the other side. This strap preferably is made to be adjustable in that there are aplurality of holes through the end portion I through which the screw 2| may be passed. From the end portion 20, the strap I4 is carried up- 20 wardly and over the leg to come up through the loop I! and then is carried over and back down around the same side of the leg 12 and around thereunder to come out on the other side by the end 22 adjacent the end l5 of the strap l3. Here this end portion 22 is adjustably secured to a button 23 by engaging the button through any one of a plurality of holes provided in that portion.

The lengths of the two straps l3 and I4 are substantially equal so as to bring the loop I! in a central position over the forward side of the leg l2 immediately behindor above the kneecap portion. By the arrangement above described, the two straps l3 and I4 cross each other cen- 5 trally of the leg immediately above or at the upper end of the artificial member H). In addition to the positioning of the loop I! above the kneecap as indicated, the crossing arrangement of the straps permits a side engagement with the leg behind the knee joint by the portion of the respective straps which turn around back and downwardly from that top loop so that the normally bulging part on the side of the knee as designated by the character A, Fig. 1, is below or forwardly of those strap portions.

Upon standing erect, the user in straightening. out the knee joint will draw the straps into a rather taut condition, the degree of which depends upon the adjustments above indicated in reference to the buttons [9 and 23 as well as the initial attaching screws l6 and 2|. The artificial limb I0 is thus held securely in position on the stump. H and cannot slide off by reason of the peculiar engagement about the leg immediately above the knee. This is of particular significance not only from the point of comfort but also to prevent an ultimate shrinking of the stump ll. When the knee is completely flexed to the sitting position, the straps l3 and I4 are quite free so that there is no pressure whatsoever exerted thereby, and yet in the ordinary flexing of the knee, such as in walking, there is suflicient gripping of the leg as will prevent any tendency of the artificial member to Work or slip off the stump II.

In the modified form of the invention as illustrated in the drawings in Figs, 5-8, the same features are preserved. In this form, two straps 24 and 25 are employed to have respective ends 26 and 21 engaged to opposite sides of the artificial member Ill. The straps 24 and 25 are carried from those side engagements upwardly and over the leg l2 immediately behind the kneecap 28 to cross one over the other and to continue on around and down under the leg to again cross each other behind the. leg substantially at the top of the artificial member I0 and have their respective end portions 29: and 30 come around forwardly to engage over buttons secured on the sides of the member Hi. It is to be noted that in this form, the ends of the same-strap are in juxtaposition one with the other on the same side of the member ID. Preferably the two straps 24 and 25 are secured permanently one to the other at their crossing over the top side of the leg by any suitable means such as a rivet 3|. In this form, all of the attachment is made through selective engagement of the end portions of the respective straps with the screws and buttons provided by the member Hi. In the first form described, the effective meeting place of the straps as defined by the loop I! may be changed somewhat by varying. the pull of one strap in relation to the other. The first form is a trifle more flexible in use although both forms give ideal service and particularly give freedom to the leg to which the artificial member is applied.

The straps above referred to in each instance are preferably made out of textile fabric such as cotton or linen webbing so as to be substantially non-stretchable. However, it is permissible to employ material that is slightly yielding but not to such an extent that will require binding of the leg to such degree that blood circulation will be retarded. Leather, of course, may be substituted for the webbing although the webbing is superior in that it is initially somewhat more flexible.

While I have herein shown and described my invention in the best form as now known to me, it is obvious that structural variations may be employed without departing from the spirit of the invention, and I, therefore, do not desire to be limited to that precise form beyond the limitations as may be imposed by the following claims.

I claim:

1. For securing an artificial leg for a belowthe-knee amputation to the stump of a. natural leg wherein the stump is received within a socket of the artificial leg, a pair of straps each extending from a central front zone to diverge outwardly and downwardly to terminate in an end each for attachment on opposing sides of the artificial leg, and also extending from that zone rearwardly and diverging laterally and thence around inwardly to cross freely one over the other substantially centrally behind said strap ends and extending forwardly in spaced apart relation to terminate each by an end for attachment on said opposing sides of the artificial leg.

2. For securing: an artificial leg for a belowthe-knee amputation to the stump of a natural leg wherein the stump is received within a socket of the artificial leg, a pair of straps each extending from a central front zone to diverge outwardly and downwardly to terminate in an end each for attachment on opposing sides of the artificial leg, and also extending from that zone rearwardly and diverging laterally and thence around inwardly to cross freely one over the other substantially centrally behind said strap ends and extending forwardly in spaced apart relation to terminate each by an-end for attachment on said opposing sides of the artificial leg, and a loop through which said straps slidingly pass,

. said loop defining said zone.

3. For securing an artificial leg for a belowthe-knee amputation to the stump of a natural leg wherein the stumpis received within a socket of the artificial leg, a pair of straps each extending from a central front zone to diverge outwardly and downwardly to terminate in an end each for attachment on opposing sides of the artificial leg, and also extending from that zone rearwardly and diverging laterally and thence around inwardly to cross freely one over the other substantially centrally behind said strap ends and extending forwardly in spaced apart relation to terminate each by an end for attachment on said opposing sides of the artificial leg, said straps being secured one tothe other at said zone.

EDWARD R, DYE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3909855 *Nov 12, 1974Oct 7, 1975Joseph G BarredoBelow-the-knee prosthesis
US4802466 *Apr 14, 1987Feb 7, 1989Andrew H. MeyersLightweight, compact orthotic device for controlling knee instabilities
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/32
International ClassificationA61F2/50, A61F2/78
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/78
European ClassificationA61F2/78