Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2235212 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1941
Filing dateApr 23, 1940
Priority dateApr 23, 1940
Publication numberUS 2235212 A, US 2235212A, US-A-2235212, US2235212 A, US2235212A
InventorsHerscovitz Louis
Original AssigneeRuberoid Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Asphalt strip shingle
US 2235212 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 18, 1941. L, HERscQvl-fz 2,235,212

ASPHALT STRIP SHINGLE Filed April 25, 1940 Agi i ma uuuM\\\\\\\\\\M///@/@lu\\\\\\MWLJ` Wil INVENTOR 0a/1s Her-.5 c alf/'72.

ATTORNEY crushed slate.

Patented Mar. 18, 1941 ASPHALT STRIP SHINGLE Louis Herscovitz, Park Ridge, Ill., assignor to The Ruberoid Co., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey application April 2s, 1940,' serial No. 331,074

9 Claims.

'I'his invention relates to shingles for covering roofs or the like, and more particularly to an improved asphalt strip shlngle.`

These shingles are cut from sheets of prepared roong material to form a plurality of joined but spaced-apart shingle-like tabs, which when the strips are laid give the appearance of a covering composed of individual shingles of the shape of the shingle-like tabs.

They have the advantage of economy and ease in laying, but because of the material of which they are made being usually only about M3 to ag" thick, they do not cast appreciable shadows along the butts of the courses as do thicker shingies, such as wood and slate.

From an ornamental standpoint, such shadows are desirable since they tend to relieve th'e fiat appearance of the covering. It is one of the objects of the invention to overcome this deficiency of the ordinary asphalt strip shingle.

According to my invention, I provide a shingle having a zone formed of alternate narrow ridges and valleys extending transversely of the strip and forming a longitudinal band that is So disposed on the surface of the strip as to be visible under the butt edges of overlying strips. This produces a shadow effect immediately below each course of butts and accentuates their thickness.

Other objects and \advantages of the invention will appear from the following description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawing, in whicht Figure l is a plan view of a conventionalized asphalt strip shingle embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of several such strips arranged in three overlapping courses;

Fig. 3 is a detailed sectional view on the lin 3 3 of Figure 1; and

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary section on the line 4--4 of Figure 1.

The strip shingle I is made of sheet material having a base II of roofing felt saturated with asphalt or other suitable waterproofing substance and having a coating I2, usually of similar bituminous substance but generally of a harder consistency, extending over the entire upper surface of the sheet, which coating is faced with particles I3 of mineral matter, such as A second layer or overlay I4 of the bituminous coating substance is applied over the first coat I2 and mineral particles I3 and is faced with mineral particles I5, preferably colored granules. The overlay coating I4 preferably extends over the entire surface of the strip although it may extend only up to the top edge of the band X hereinafter described. The granules in the area of the band X may be of 'a coningv shingle-like tabs I6, separated by recesses I1 of complemental form. In the preferred emarev rectangular, although they may Ibe of anyother shape. 'I'he exposed surfaces of the tabs I6 and the portion of the strip below the band X may be plain or textured, as desired. A small tab I8 of senil-circular or other form may be provided at one end of the body of the shingle and corresponding recess I9 at the other end for convenience in aligning the shingles of a course, one with another.

After the coatings of asphalt and mineral particles have been applied, and preferably before the strips have been cut, the sheet isimpressed or embossed with a suitable embossing roll or other suitable means to form a band X of alternating depressions or valleys and ridges 2'I in the top coating. The valleys are formed by pressing the mineral particles I4 in the area of the band, so that they are embedded in the coating, thusl somewhat darkening the valleys as by extrusion of the asphalt coating. -The band X composed of these valleys 20 and ridges 2I is approximately 21A" wide and is so disposed on the body portion of the strip that when the strips are applied, as indicated in Fig. 2, a p0rtion of the length of the band of the strips of one course A will be exposed below the butt edge of the tabs I6 of the strips of each third course C, while portions of the band on the strips of the second course B will likewise be exposed in the recesses I1 of the strips of each third course C. These exposures give the covering the desired shadow effect and tend to increase the apparent thickness of the butts.

In usingthe term ridges to define the portions 2I that intervene the depressions 20, it is to be understood that they need not project upwardly beyond the plane of the upper surface of the strip. It will be seen that the ridges 2| and valleys 20 extend in a general direction transverse of the strip but are somewhat inclined or curved and not parallel to one another throughout the length of the band. This has the advantage that when wind drives rain across a pitched roof having a covering of such strips, the depressions tend to act as dams or barriers and to direct the rainwater down from the butts in different and diverging paths.

The strips are generally laid from the eaves of the roof up, the lowest course being applied rst,

and so on. The strips of each course are laid with the butt edges of the tabs I6 in "registration with the upper edges of the recesses I1 of the strip of the next lower course, and when so laid these edges lie on or just below the upper edge of the bands X of two lower courses, respectively, as hereinbefore described.

In some instances the second coating or overlay of asphalt I4 and mineral granules I5 may be omitted, in which case the coating I2 may be made somewhat; thicker than usual and the valleys and ridges 2| may be formed therein. Other modifications may be made withinA the scope of the invention as herein described and claimed.

I claim:

1. A shingle comprising a strip of waterproofed fibrous material coated on its entire upper surface with a layer of bituminous substance faced with mineral particles, and having a second coating layer of' bituminous substance and mineral particles over the rst layer, said shingle having tabs separated by recesses of complemental form along the lower edge of its body portion, and a band extending lengthwise of the strip formed of alternate transversely extending depressions and ridges, said band being disposed on the upper surface ofthe body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges in position`to be exposed 'below the lower edge of the body portion of the strips of the next succeeding course and below the butt edges of the tabs of the strips of the third succeeding course.

2. A shingle comprising a strip of waterproofed fibrous material coated on its entire upper surface with a layer of bituminous substance faced with mineral particles, and having a second coating layer of bituminous substance and mineral particles over the first layer said shingle having tabs separated by recesses of complemental form along the lower edge of its body portion, and a band extending lengthwise of the strip formed of alternate depressions and ridges variously inclined in the direction of the width of the strip, said band being disposed on the upper surface of the body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges in position to be exposed below the lower edge of the body portion of the strips of the next succeeding course and below the butt edges of the tabs of the strips of the third succeeding course.

3. A shingle comprising a strip of waterproofed fibrous material coated on its entire upper surface with a layer of bituminous substance faced with mineral particles, and having a second coating layer of bituminous substance and mineral 4 particles over the first layer, said shingle having tabs separated lby recesses of complemental form along the lower edge of its body portion, and a band extending lengthwise of the strip formed of alternate depressions and ridges variously inclined in the direction of the width of the strip and being generally non-parallel to one another throughout the length of the band, said band being disposed on the upper surface of the body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges in position to be exposed below the lower edge of the body portion of the strips of the next succeeding course and below the butt edges of the tabs of the strips of the third succeeding course.

4. A shingle comprising a strip of roofing felt having on its upper surface two layers of bituminous coating substance each faced with particles of mineral matter, one surfaced on the other, said strip having the lower edge of its body portion formed with alternate tabs and recesses of complemental form, and a band extending lengthwise of the body vof the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges, said iband being formed in a series of spaced apart depressions in the second coating layer extending across the width of the band.

5. A shingle comprising a strip of roofing felt having on its upper surface two layers of bituminous coating substance each faced with particles of mineral matter, one surfaced on the other, said strip having the lower edge of its body portion formed with alternate tabs and recesses of complemental form, and a band extending lengthwise of the body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges, said band being formed in a series of spaced apart depressions in the second coating layer extending across the width of the band and at various inclinations to its longitudinal edges.

6. A shingle strip comprising a fibrous base coated with two superposed layers of bituminous substance each faced with mineral particles, the second layer being faced with colored particles, said strip having tabs spaced apart along' the lower edge of its body portion, and a series of alternate ridges and depressions lforming a band that extends lengthwise of the body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges, the depressions extending into the second coating layer with the mineral particles thereof substantially covered by the extruded coating substance to give the depressions a darker color than the intervening ridges.

7. A shingle strip comprising a fibrous base coated with two superposed layers of bituminous substance each faced with mineral particles, the second layer being faced with colored particles, said strip having tabs spaced apart along the lower edge of its body portion, and a series of alternate ridges and depressions forming a band that extends lengthwise of the body of the strip intermediate itsA upper and lower edges, the mineral granules in the area of said band being of contrasting shade or darker color from those on the rest of the shingle strip below the band.

8. A shingle strip comprising a fibrous base coated with a waterproof bituminous coating substance faced with mineral particles, said strip having tabs spaced apart along the lower edge of its body portion, and a series of alternate ridges and depressions forming a band that extends lengthwise of the body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges in position to be exposed immediately below lower edge portions of two succeeding courses.

9. A shingle strip comprising a fibrous base coated with a waterproof bituminous coating substance faced with mineral particles, said strip having tabs spaced apart along the lower edge of its body portion, and a series of alternate ridges and depressions forming a band that extends lengthwise of the body of the strip intermediate its upper and lower edges in position to be exposed immediately below lower edge portions of two succeeding courses, the mineral particles in the area of the band being of a darker shade or color than those on the rest of the face of the strip.

LOUIS HERSCOVITZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5615523 *Apr 24, 1995Apr 1, 1997Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Roof having resinous shingles
US7805909Apr 9, 2009Oct 5, 2010Teng Yishien HApplying a portion of low density granules to the prime region of the shingle so the density of the granules on the headlap are lower than those on the prime region; substituting the low density granules for existing headlap materials reduces wear of the cutting knife; cost efficiency
US8136322Aug 25, 2009Mar 20, 2012Tamko Building Products, Inc.Composite shingle
WO1996034162A1 *Apr 10, 1996Oct 31, 1996Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpA roof containing resinous material and filler
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/518
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D2001/005
European ClassificationE04D1/26