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Publication numberUS2236007 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1941
Filing dateDec 31, 1938
Priority dateDec 31, 1938
Publication numberUS 2236007 A, US 2236007A, US-A-2236007, US2236007 A, US2236007A
InventorsJohn M Oldham
Original AssigneeL A Young
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cushion structure
US 2236007 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 25, 1941. J. M. OLDHAM CUSHION STRUCTURE Filed Dec. 51, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. \7c m fl/ 0261/70/29 B 5" MW ATTORNEYS March 25, 1941- J. M. OLDHAM CUSHION STRUCTURE Filed Dec. 31, 1958 2 Sheet's-Sheet 2 Patented Mar. 25, 1941 UNITED STATES CUSHION STRUCTURE John M. Oldham, Pleasant Ridge, Mich, assignor to L. A. Young, Detroit, Mich.

Application December 31, 1938, Serial No. 248,848

10 Claims.

This invention relates to cushion springs for mattresses, seat bottoms, seat backs, etc. years, the luxury spring cushion used in automobile seats has been the Marshall spring described and claimed in the Marshall Patent No. 685,160. This comprises a plurality of light springs put under considerable initial compression when they are inserted in cloth pockets. The cloth pockets permit a larger number of springs to be placed in a cushion because they can be placed closely together. Because of the large number, the springs can be made weaker and, consequently, are softer and they do not have to be tied together in the same way that an open spring has to and, consequently, they act more individually and the spring action is not so stiff and rigid.

Of late, a new type of cushion has appeared on the market involving the use of deep sponge rubber. Many advantages in the way of easier riding comfort, a softer action, etc. are claimed for this cushion but it is very expensive.

It is the object of the present invention to afford a seat cushion which has the claimed advantages of the sponge rubber cushion and whic is a much cheaper construction.

In the drawings:

Fig 1 is a perspective of the cushion.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary section.

Fig. 3 is a section through one of the individual cells or pockets.

Fig. 4 shows the pocket and contents before the pocket is sewed up.

Fig. 5 is a section through an individual cell showing a modified form.

Fig. 6 is a cross section through the cushion showing a modified form.

The cushion is made up of a plurality of fabric pockets I formed by sewing together strips. In each pocket is contained a helical spring 2 in which is a core or cartridge 3. This spring, as will be seen from the drawings, is of somewhat less diameter than the pocket when it is used with a core of cotton or other stufling. In the.Marshall spring, the diameter of the spring is nearly that of the pocket and, consequently, the springs almost touch adjacent springs except for the interposition of the pocket material and the only spacing is the frame. In my improved cushion, the springs are somewhat spaced from each other and, when the springs are compressed, the core of stufiing bulges between the whorls of the coil and the extruded material spaces the springs. This allows the use of a somewhat less number of springs in each cushion and, therefore, is eco- For nomical from the standpoint of the springs, The saving in the number of springs tends to compensate for, if it does not compensate for, the cost of the cotton filler material used in the springs. The cotton filler material supplements the light 5 spring action by affording a softer action as this slows up the spring action. It delays the depression of the springs and it also delays the rebound of the springs. This is due to the friction afforded by the cotton fibers. In a. word, the combined action of the cotton cores and the springs gives one the illusion of floating and affords a very pleasing action.

Another thing: In the average Marshall cushion, the springs are put under initial compression 15 of substantially two inches. 01 course, this is relative as this depends upon the size and thickness of the spring. But, I am speaking of an average size cushion. With my cushion and with the core of stuffing material, the spring in the average cushion is put under an initial compression of only about one inch. A comparison of Figs. 3 and 4 shows how, when the pockets are sewed up, the cushion is compressed. The initial compression of the spring is only about half of what is the standard practice in the luxury type of spring cushions. This makes the spring somewhat softer and it eases somewhat on the rebound action of thecushion. This affords a softer, more nearly floating action than has been customary with the Marshall type of spring.

In Fig. 5, I have shown a core in the form of a cartridge enclosed in a tobacco cloth or cheese cloth which is designated 4, This has an advantage in handling the cores and keeping the stufling material together and also tends to preserve the shape of the stuffing material after it is placed within the helix but it is by no means indispensable.

In Fig. 6, I have shown a modified form of the construction in which the springs at the front and back of the cushion are strictly the old Marshall type. It is desirable in many cushions to use a more rigid type of spring at the edges so as to better preserve the contour of the cushion. This can be done without the comfort of the passenger suffering because most of his weight is supported in the middle of the cushion. With this Marshall spring 5 at the edges, I make it of a slightly heavier wire and also make the diameter greater to fill the pocket, as is clearly shown in Fig. 6. Fewer springs, therefore, are required at the edges. The gauge of the wire is somewhat exaggerated here in order to make comparison with the lighter gauge shown in the adjoining pictures.

Also, the strip of pocket material is a heavier material, such as burlap, designated 6. This is better adapted to handle the heavy type of spring used at the edges.

Preferably, the core or stuffing material is cotton, or other wadding, but sponge rubber may be used.

What I claim is:

1. In a Marshall type of cushion spring, the combination of a plurality of fabric pockets arranged closely together, helical springs contained in said pockets but of considerably less diameter than the pockets so adJacent springs are somewhat spaced when the springs are not carrying a load and cores of stuffing material contained in the center of the spring and bulging beyond the exterior of the spring when compressed to fill out the pockets and cause adjacent cores and pockets to abut.

2. In a Marshall type of cushion spring, the combination of a plurality of fabric pockets arranged closely together, light helical springs contained in the pockets and put under a relatively small initial compression and cartridges or cores of stumng material telescoped in and filling the inside of the helical spring and reaching from top to bottom of the spring.

3, In a-Marshall type of cushion spring, the

combination of a plurality of flexible pockets.

arranged closely together, light helical springs contained in the pockets, said springs spaced when not under load, and cartridges of stuffing material filling the inside of the helixes and comprising a substantial cylinder of cotton telescoped in and coextensive with the springs and bulging between the coils of the spring to act as spaces for the pockets when under load.

4. In a Marshall type of cushion spring, a pinrality of fabric pockets arranged closely together, and light springs contained in said pockets but of less diameter than the pockets and stufling material filling the interior of the spring and when compressed bulging the outside to fill out the pocket and to space the springs in the cushion.

5. In a Marshall type of cushion spring, the combination of a plurality of pockets arranged closely together and formed by sewing strips of fabrics together, helical springs inserted in the pockets and put under a limited initial compression and cartridges of cotton filling the interior of the springs and substantially coextensive in length with the springs.

arranged closely together, springs contained in I the pockets of the front and rear edges of substantially the diameter of the pockets when distended and helical springs contained in the remaining parts of considerably less diameter than the pockets and cores of stuffing material substantially coextensive of the length of the spring filling only the said springs of less diameter than the distended pockets.

7. In a Marshall type of cushion spring, the combination of a plurality of pockets in rows arranged closely together, helical springs of relatively heavy gauge in the front and rear rows of pockets in the cushion and substantially filling out the pockets when the pockets are distended, helical springs of considerably less diameter than the distended pockets filling the remaining pockets and cores of stuffing material filling such hprings of lesser diameter, the springs of larger diameter at the front and rear of the cushion being of heavier gauge wire.

8. In a Marshall type of cushion spring, the combination of a plurality of pockets arranged closely together and arranged in rows, helical springs of relatively heavy gauge in the front and rear rows of pockets and substantially filling out the pockets when the pockets are distended, helical springs of considerably less diameter than the distended pockets filling the remaining pockets and cores of stuifing material filling such springs of lesser diameter, the springs of larger diameter at the front and rear of the cushion being of heavier gauge wire and the pocket material in the front and rear rows being of heavier material, such as burlap.

9. In a spring cushion, the combination of a plurality of light helical springs, a plurality of individual cartridges of stufiing material stuffed into the springs and bulging beyond the diameter of the springs when the springs are compressed to space the springs when they are grouped together.

10. In a spring cushion, the combination of a plurality of helical springs somewhat spaced from each other, individual cartridges of cotton substantially coextensive with the length of the springs filling the interior of the springs and bulging out on the outside of the springs when compressed to space the springs.

JOHN M. OLDHAM.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3401411 *Mar 10, 1967Sep 17, 1968Morrison BenUpholstery construction
US5332202 *Feb 6, 1991Jul 26, 1994The Ohio Mattress Company Licensing And Components GroupPneumatic member and related attachment elements for cushions, seats, foundations and the like
US5414874 *Mar 30, 1994May 16, 1995The Ohio Mattress Company Licensing & Components GroupAttachment member for spring or spring-like element
US5435023 *Mar 30, 1994Jul 25, 1995The Ohio Mattress Company Licensing And Components GroupWire grid attachment member for cushions, seats, foundations and the like
US6317912 *Mar 8, 2000Nov 20, 2001Kurtis F. GraebeBed mattress with air cells and spring pockets
US6398199 *Sep 3, 1999Jun 4, 2002Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Coil spring assembly
US6540214 *Dec 28, 2001Apr 1, 2003Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Coil spring assembly
US6826796Aug 6, 2003Dec 7, 2004L&P Property Management CompanyPocketed bedding or seating product having strings of springs with vertically offset pockets
US6862763Dec 2, 2002Mar 8, 2005L&P Property Management CompanyPocketed bedding or seating product having pockets of differing heights
US6883196Nov 26, 2003Apr 26, 2005Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Encased coil innerspring assembly
US6966091Nov 26, 2003Nov 22, 2005Barber Manufacturing Company, Inc.Coil innerspring assembly having varying degrees of firmness
US8918934 *Apr 16, 2013Dec 30, 2014Otis Bed Manufacturing Company, Inc.Linked coil mattress assembly
US20040128773 *Nov 26, 2003Jul 8, 2004Barber James R.Coil innerspring assembly having varying degrees of firmness
US20040133988 *Nov 26, 2003Jul 15, 2004Barber James R.Encased coil innerspring assembly
US20070017035 *Jul 25, 2006Jan 25, 2007Jack ChenMattress and Coil-in-Coil Assembly
US20130276239 *Apr 16, 2013Oct 24, 2013Otis Bed Manufacturing Company, Inc.Linked coil mattress assembly
WO2001065978A2 *Mar 8, 2001Sep 13, 2001Graebe Kurtis FBed mattress with air cells and spring pockets
WO2001065978A3 *Mar 8, 2001Feb 7, 2002Kurtis F GraebeBed mattress with air cells and spring pockets
WO2005016073A1 *Aug 2, 2004Feb 24, 2005L & P Property Management CompanyPocketed bedding or seating product having strings of springs with vertically offset pockets
Classifications
U.S. Classification267/93, 5/720
International ClassificationA47C27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/04, A47C27/064
European ClassificationA47C27/04, A47C27/06D1