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Publication numberUS2237106 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1941
Filing dateApr 25, 1938
Priority dateApr 25, 1938
Publication numberUS 2237106 A, US 2237106A, US-A-2237106, US2237106 A, US2237106A
InventorsRay Minert Theodore
Original AssigneeRay Minert Theodore
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Highway barrier
US 2237106 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April l, 1941. T. R. MINERT HIGHWAY BARRIFR- Filed April 25. 193e 2 Sheets-Sheet l April 1, 1941.V T R M,NERT 2,237,106

-HIGHWAY BARRIER .Filed April l25,1958 2 'sheets-sheet 2 Pfg-a. v

` 4 Q mwym Thgdra Ray Mina/ri pants. able for use at railway crossings.

Patented Apr. 1, 1941 UNITED STATESPATENT OFFICE HIGHWAY-BARRIER Theodore Ray Mineria, Milwaukee, Wis. Application April 25, 193s, serial No'. 204,072

n 14 claims., (C1. 39-1) This invention relates to barriers and refers particularly to highway barriers of the type designed to stop a vehicle moving along -the highway, without injury to the vehicle or its occu- The invention is thus particularly suit- Barriers of this class generally comprise a suitable supporting structure between which the barrierper se is mounted for vertical movement to and from an operative position. Generally, the mechanism for raising and lowering the barrier is automatically controlled by the approach of the train.

'I'he barrier per se is so constructed that when a. vehicle strikes it, it is brought to a gradual stop. The'shock of the impact is cushioned by paying out the flexible barrier against the opposition of a yielding retarding device.

Considerable difficulty has been experienced with past constructions for the reason that the pay out device was connected with the barrier per se in such a way that stress due to impact was transmitted to the raising and lowering mechanism. These past constructions were also subject to the objection of an exceptionally large number of moving parts and comparatively complicated design.

Another very serious disadvantage of past constructions resided in the fact that the structure to 'be raised and lowered was comparatively heavy.

1 With these and other objections to past and existing highway barriers in mind, this invention has as one of its objects to provide a barrier of this type which is simple in construction and which involves but very few parts.

Another object of this invention is to provide a highway barrier so constructed that the barrierper se may be raised and lowered without in anywise disturbing the retarding or resisting means.

A further object of this invention is to provide a highway barrier of the character described wherein the force of an impact is carried directly by the fixed supporting columns and without in anywise imposing strain upon the raising and lowering mechanism or any of the other driving instrumentalities.

Another object of this invention is to provide a highway barrier of the character described which is adaptable to below gra-de construction.

With the above and other objects in v iew which will appear as the description proceeds, this inventionresides in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts substantially as hereinafter described, and more particularly dened'by the appended claims, it beingl understood that such changes in the precise embodiment of-the hereindisclosed invention may be made as'come within the scope of the claims.

The accompanying drawings illustrate two complete examples of the physical embodiment of the invention constructed according to the best modes so far'devised for the practical application of the principles thereof, and in which:

Figure l is a front view oa highway barrier constructed in accordance wtih this invention; Figure .2 is a plan YView showing the relative positions of the barrier with an intersecting railroad and highway, and also showing the manner in which the barrier per se is extended by a vehicle striking the same;

Figure 3 is a detail view illustrating the mechanism for paying out the barrier, and the manner in which such paying out is yieldingly` opposed;

Figure 4 is a detail sectional view taken through Figure 3 on the planeof the line 4 4;

vFigure is a side view of the frame of one of the paying out devices;

Figure 6 is a cross sectional view taken through Figure 3 on the plane of the line 6-6;

Figure 7 is a cross sectional View taken through Figure 4 on the plane of the line`1-'I;

Figure 8 is a detail sectional view taken on the plane of the line B Bin Figure 4; and

Figure 9 is a front view of one end of va modied embodiment of the invention to illustrate its adaptability to below grade construction.

Referring now. particularly tothe accompanyi ing drawings, the numeral. I. designates upright supporting columns, one at each side ,of the highway, which, together withan overhead horizontal cross member 2 joining the upper ends of the supporting columns, constitutes a main supporting frame. A exible barrier B extends across the space between the Acolumns for movement from'an overhead out of the way position, shown in dotted lines in Figure 1, to an'operative posi- ,Y tion across the roadway, shown in fulljlines in Figure 1.

The ilexibl-e barrier may be constructed in many diiereni; ways, bult preferably comprises two lhorizolnltal cables 3 `joined by a number olf venti- :cal ties 4. .The ends of the cables are attached frto and wound on .pay out spools 5. 'These pay out spools, as will .be hereinafter more fully described, are mounted :to move vertically along the colwmns tocar-ry the barrier to and from its operaltive position. The `cables 3 are o-f-suicienrt length and have suicient reserve wound on the spools to allow the vehicle to move forwardly a substantial distance after striking the barrier.

To raise the barrier B to its overhead position, an electric motor and a sui-table drum mechanism, indicated generally by the numeral 6, is provided. Cables 'I and 8 having one end wound up on this drum mechanism, are trained over sheaves 9 and lil, respectively, mounted at the upper ends of the columns and have their free ends connected to frames I I which carry the pay out spools for vertical motion within the columns.

The mechanism in the two columns is identi-l cal. Hence, a description of one will suflice for both. i

The supporting column, as ures 6 and 7, is of hollow substantially rectangul-ar construction with the inner wall thereof centrally cut away to provide a slot bounded by guide flanges I2. Extending Alongitudinally throughout the height of thecolumn is a rotatable shailt I3, the upper end of the shaft being journalled in a bearing I4 and the lower end thereof being stepped in a bearing I5. A-.keyway extends along the length of the shaft .for at least the extent of the vertical motion ofthe barrier.

The pay out spool 5 is sl-idablealong the shaft I3 and is ,nonrota'tably connected thereto through a flexible coupling IlB. This flexible coupling pro- Vides the desired nonrotaitable but freely slidable driving connection between the spool and the shaft, while allo-wing the spool to .move laterally with respect tothe shaft a limited distance for a purpose to be hereinafter described, it being understood that the bore through thespool is suiiiciently large to accommodate such sidewise shifting thereof.

The flexible coupling I6 may be of `any suitabie construction, and in the present instance, consists of la hub-like memberv II rigidly joined to the spool 5 and provided with la `diainetrically extending Icross slot I8 in which a block I9 is slidably disposed. The `.block I9 `in turn lhas a cross sl-ot arranged at right angles to the slot I8 to receive Ia, square block 2 If, ,and the block 2I is slidably splinedto the shaft, as shown in Figure 8.

The frame II which carries the spooi 15 has spaced parallel side 22 vconnected at the l op and bottom by 'cross members y213, both of which rotatably receive trunnions v24 on 'rt-he lends of `the spool. Each side rail ci the frame carries two guide rollers 25 mounted on the spring blades 2'8. The normal tension fof the barrier holds the rollers in V-en-gagement with the gui-de flanges I2 on the column and las long as the strength of the spring blades 26 is not exceeded, 'the spool 5 is heldlcoaxially disposed with respect to the shaft I3. However, when the barrier struck by a vehicle, the additional tension on the barrier overcomes the resiliency of the spring blades v26 and allows the side rails of the frame to eng-agethe guide flanges Ie2 directly so that the iorce of 'the impact is transmitted to the column without imposing strain u'pon'the slra'ft I-3.

As best illustrated in Figures 3 and 4, the spool has smooth end portions on which the cables 3 are wound, and acentral threaded portion 21. Engaging this threaded portion is an internally threaded arm 2'8 forming .part ,of a cableguide 129, the upper iend of which forms a bracket arm 3l) which is bored tofslidlably engage 'the shaft I3. Ylit properly spaced points, the guide 23 has cable I3| and `idler rollers best shownin Flig-y 32 to properly guide 'the cables as they are payed out and retrieved.

When a vehicle strikes the barrier `and the reserve length of the cables is paid out off the spools 5, both of the shafts I3 are rotated in a direction opposed =by retarding means, indicated generally by the numeral i33, mounted be- -low grade and connected withthe shafts. These retarding means comprise lelongated 4cylinders 34 mounted in iixed horizontal ypositions and enclosing sections of the coil springs 35.

One lend ot each series lof coil springs bea-rs against a cap 36 closing the end of the cylinder adjacent to the shaft I3 for vwhich that particuv lar retarding device is provided, land the opposite end of the series of coil springs has a head 3'I bearing thereagainst to which the end of a cable 38 is secured. Hence, -a pull on the cable 318 compresses the spring sections.

The iree ends of the cables v38 are fixed to spools 39 non-rotatably mounted on the lower ends of the vshafts I3.

The direction of reeving of the cables38 on the spools 39 is opposite to that o-f the cables 3 on the spools `5 so that when the cables 3 are unwound from the spools 5, the cables 38 are wound up on the spools 39 to compress the `coil springs, as will be readily apparent.

The opposition force of the coil springs of each retarding device may be augmented by a brake 4I) consisting of two `cones =4|I positioned apeX-to-apex with4 their bases engaging the adjacent ends of two sections oi coil springsand having brake shoe segments 42 interposed therebetween to be spread radially into frictional contact with the inner wall of the cylinder upon endwise yapproach of thecones 4I. 'Dh-ese brakes, in addition. to 'augmenting the opposition ltorce of the springs, also offer eno-ugh resistance to free motion thereof along lthe :cylinders to insure a. .cushioned return of the barrier to its normal position.

While the yconstruction shown as a preferred embodiment of this invention is of the overhead type wherein the barrier .in its inoperative posi.

ti'o'n is elevated, it will be readily apparent that this invention is also capable of below grade construction. This embodiment of the invention is illustrated fin Figure 9.

In this case, al1 of the .mechanism is identical to that described, but the columns instead of'` projecting -a substantial distance above grade are onlyliigh enough to enable the barrier 'to be 'raised from a trough or pit extending transversely across the highway through a suitable trap door (not shown) to its operative position across the roadway. f

The manner in which impact is resisted and the barrier paid out Vis exactly the same as that described, and likewise, the `manner in which the pay out spools and the barrier are elevated may be `the same as that described.

From the -foregoing description taken in 'connection with the accompanying drawings, it 'w'i'll' be readily apparent to -those skilled in 'the artv that this invention provides -a commercially' practical highway barrier particularly adapted for use at highway-railroad intersections.

What I claim as my invention is: Y

1. I-n `a device cf the character described: a.` flexible barrier mounted to move vertically "to and'fr'oin it's'ope'rative position; a pay 'out 'device movable with the flexible barrier; stationa'rilyv m'oun'ted :retafdn'g means; 'and 'drvg 'Clrfections between kthe pay out device land the -retarding'meanssaid driving connections including a ve'rt'ical rotatable shaft having a vertically movable-'driving connection Vwith the pay out device so thatthe drivmg connections remain regardless 'ofthe position of the barrier and pay out device.

r 2.v In a device of the character described: two `spaced upright supports; a rotatable shaft mounted Avertically from each support; a pay out deviceA slidable along each support and having a sliding driving connection with the adjacent rotatable shaft; a flexible barrier extending between thesupports with its opposite ends connected to thepay out devices; and retarding means permanently connected with said rotatable shafts. "f'. In a device of the character described: 'two spaced upright supports; a rotatable shaft mounted vertically'from each support; a pay out devicevslidable along each support and having a sliding driving connection with the adjacent rotatable shaft; a flexible barrier extending between the supports with its opposite ends connected to the pay out devices; retarding means permanently connected with said rotatable shafts; and means for moving the barrier and the pay out devices vertically along the supports to and from an operative position.

4.V A device for stopping vehicles moving along a highway comprising: fixed supports at opposite sides of the highway, said fixed supports providing vertical guideways; a vertical rotatable shaft carried by each of said fixed supports; pay out spools slidable along the guideways and having axially slidable but nonrotatable driving connections with the shafts; a flexible barrier extending between said supports and having its opposite ends wound on said pay out spools; and retarding means connected with the rotatable shafts to oppose unwinding of the barrier from said pay out spools.

5. A device for stopping vehicles moving along a highway comprising: fixed vertical guideways at opposite sides of the highway; vertical rotatably mounted shafts adjacent to the guideways; pay out spools movable along said guideways and having axially slidable but nonrotatable driving connections with the rotatable shafts; a flexible barrier extending across the highway with its ends wound on the pay out spools; and retarding means mounted below grade and connected with the rotatable shafts for retarding the unwinding of the barrier ends off the pay out spools.

6. A device for stopping vehicles moving along a highway comprising: a fixed upright guideway on each side of the highway; a flexible barrier extending between the guideways; means slidable along said guideways and having the ends of the flexible barrier attached thereto; one of said last named means at least constituting a pay out device having a spool on which the adjacent end of the flexible barrier is wound; a vertically disposed rotatable shaft parallel to the adjacent guideway; means providing an axially slidable but nonrotatable driving connection between the pay out spool and the rotatable shaft; and retarding means connected with the rotatable shaft to oppose unwinding of the flexible barrier off the pay out spool.

7. A device for stopping a vehicle moving along a highway comprising: upright supporting columns at opposite sides of the highway; a flexible barrier extending between said columns; pay out devices vertically movable along the columns and having the ends of the flexible barrier attached thereto; means for raising and lowering said pay out devices along the columns;

. retarding means providing opposition to the .pay-

ing out :of Ithe flexiblebarrier by the payout devices; and driving connections `between the rpay out devices andthe retarding means enabling vertical movement of the barrier and the pay out devices without'disturbing the retarding means, including a vertical shaft rotatablylsupported by each of said supporting columns and having a vertically movable driving'connection with said pay out devices. f v

8. A device for stopping a vehicle moving along a highway comprising: an upright support `at each side of the highway, each support having vertical guide meahs--a pay outv device movable along each guideA means; a flexible barrier vextending across the space betweengthe supports and having its opposite ends wound on said pay out devices; retarding means for opposing the unwinding of the barrier ends off the payout devices; a vertical shaft rotatably carried vby each support; driving connectionsr between the retarding means and the shafts; andv free sliding driving connections between the pay out devices and the shafts, said last named connections including flexible couplings to allow lateral shifting of the pay out devices into firm engagement with the guideways'without imposing lateral stress on thevertical shafts. A

9. ,In a device of the character described: an upright hollow column having'a vertical slot bounded by guide flanges; a rotatable shaft mounted vertically within the hollow column; a spool slidably splined to the rotatable shaft through a flexible coupling enabling a degree of lateral motion of the spool with respect to the shaft; a guide carriage connected with the spool and disposed within the hollow column; resilient means carried by the carriage and engaging the guide flanges for normally holding the carriage and the spool in coaxial relationship with the shaft; a flexible barrier having a part wound on said spool and adapted when struck to be un-v wound therefrom and to drawrthe spool and its carriage against the guide anges; retardngl means connected with the shaft to oppose unwinding of the barrier off the spool; and means for moving the spool and its carriage vertically along the column.

10. In a device of the character described: a vertical shaft rotatably mounted; a spool movable along the shaft, the boreof the spool being large enough to permit the same to shift laterally wi-th respect to the shaft; a flexible barrier having an end received on the spool; a flexible coupling slidably drivingly connecting the spool with the shaft; a fixed guideway alongside the shaft; a carrier connected with the spool; and means on the carrier riding on the guideway to normally hold the spool coaxially with respect to the shaft.

11. In a device of the character described: a vertical shaft rotatably mounted; a spool movable along the shaft, the bore of the spool being large enough to permit the same to shift laterally with respect to the shaft; a flexible barrier having an attaching and wound on the spool; a flexible lcoupling slidably drivingly connecting the spool spool may be transmitted directly to the guideway.

12. In a device of the character described: a vertical shaft rotatably mounted; retarding means connected with the shaft to yieldingly oppose rotation of the same in one direction of rotation; a spool slidable along the shaft; a flexible barrier having an end wound on the spool, the bore in the spool through which the shaft passes being large enough to allow limited lateral `movement of the spool With respect to the shaft; a flexible coupling drivingly connecting the spool with the shaft while enabling lateral shifting of the spool with respect to the shaft; rigid vertical guide means alongside the shaft; a rigid carrier for the spool; and resiliently mounted tracking members on the carrier engaging the guide means to normally hold the spool coaidally with respect to the shaft," said tracking means yielding upon the application of side thrust on the spool as by an object striking the iiexible barrier to enable direct engagement of the frame with the rigid guide means so that the force of impact is carried by the guide means to leave the shaft free to turn against the opposition of the retarding means.

13. In a highway barrier of the character described: a rigid support; a rotatable shaft vertically mounted from said support; a iiexible barrier movable to a position across a highway, said barrier having an attaching end portion; means slidable on the shaft receiving the attaching end portion of the barrier for paying out the barrier upon being struck by a vehicle; retarding means connected through the shaft with the pay out means for opposing the paying out of the barrier, said retarding means comprising a cylinder, spaced sections of coil springs in 'the cylinder adapted to be endwise compressed, and an expanding brake interposed between adjacent sections of coil springs to be expanded upon compression thereof into frictional engagement with the inner wall of the cylinder,

14. A highway barrier of the character described comprising: an upright supporting co1- umn on each side of the highwayv with part thereof projecting above grade and part thereof extending below grade; pay out devices slidably mounted on said supports; means for simultaneously effecting vertical movement of said pay out devices from positions below grade to operative positions above grade; a flexible barrier carried by said pay out devices adapted to be carried up to its operative position across the highway from an excavation below grade; retarding means below grade operable to oppose the paying out of the flexible barrier by said pay out devices, and a driving connection between the retarding means and the pay out devices including a vertical rotatable shaft supported by each of said supporting columns and slidably drivingly connected with said pay out devices.

l'IHEODGRE RAY MINERT.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/9, 49/34, 244/110.00R, 242/397.3, 160/368.1
International ClassificationB61L29/00, B61L29/02
Cooperative ClassificationB61L29/023
European ClassificationB61L29/02A